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Archive for the ‘Gardens’ Category

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Rooftop Garden in Dumbo, NYC / Architectural Digest

Can a Professionally Designed Garden Add Value to Your Home? The Huffington Post, 1/4/15
“This year marks the 300th anniversary of the birth of Capability Brown – the landscape architect renowned for designing over 170 country house estates and gardens during the 18th century. His elegant style of undulating parkland and serpentine lakes can still be seen at dozens of locations, including Blenheim Palace and Stowe.”

See a Rooftop Garden in Brooklyn Inspired by the High Line Architectural Digest, 1/6/15
“Few cities in the world have real estate as expensive as New York’s. For its millions of residents, the idea of certain amenities, such as a private garden—must be quickly abandoned. Yet one apartment building in Brooklyn’s trendy Dumbo neighborhood is creatively changing all of that.”

The New Dolores Park Will Be Pristine—But Can It Last? Curbed, 1/7/15
“It was another beautiful morning in Dolores Park, accompanied by the soothing sound of jackhammers. City officials—including Mayor Ed Lee, Supervisor Scott Wiener, and Dolores Park’s Project Manager Jacob Gilchrist—went along on a preview hard hat tour (sans hard hats—it’s mostly just grass out there, after all) of the park’s south end to show off the final phase of the park’s $20.5 million renovation.”

To Preserve and Protect: Working with ArboristsMetropolis, 1/7/15
“As landscape architects we love trees! Be they pre-existing or newly planted, trees are often the backbone to a site design. Mature, statuesque trees add invaluable character to a place and are often a site’s greatest asset or attraction.”

Field Mighty Real The Architect’s Newspaper, 1/11/15
“Once a quarry, then a landfill, the property at Circle Acres Nature Preserve in the Montopolis neighborhood of Austin was purchased by Ecology Action of Texas with the goal of transforming the site into a nature preserve and park.”

Let’s Talk Water Planetizen, 1/12/15
“It is important to note that landscape architects have been leaders in sustainable design since long before it became a hot topic. Environmental stewardship is a core value of the profession, and designing with water in a responsible and beautiful manner is what we do.”

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The Authentic Garden: Naturalistic and Contemporary Landscape Design / The Monacelli Press

The Authentic Garden: Naturalistic and Contemporary Landscape Design / The Monacelli Press

In The Authentic Garden: Naturalistic and Contemporary Landscape Design, Richard Hartlage, affiliate ASLA, and Sandy Fischer, ASLA, founders of Land Morphology in Seattle, show us the planting designs that have shaped landscape architecture, featuring “never-before-published” examples of 60 influential gardens. Organized by design movement, the book features more than 250 full-color photographs highlighting the work of well-known designers such as Andrea Cochran, FASLA, Raymond Jungles, FASLA, Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA, Michael Vergason, FASLA, and many others. The book’s strength is its breadth, even within the seemingly-narrow focus on planting design.

Plants as Architecture

Plants can create structure for a larger landscape. This idea is the very “essence of landscape architecture, and essential to garden- and place-making,” the authors write in the book’s first chapter, which focuses on how plants can be used to divide and manipulate spaces. The chapter begins with the history of English topiary gardens dating back to the 1700s before transitioning to more contemporary interpretations.

OLIN’s design for the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a contemporary standout, with mature trees creating a striking division between the museum and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The mottled trunks on these London plane trees also provide a complement to the fossilized limestone of the buildings’ façade, while drawing attention to their height.

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Barnes Foundation by Olin Partnership / By Michael Moran for the Architectural Review

Artfully Naturalistic Gardens

Those familiar with naturalistic planting design, an approach that appears seemingly natural but is actually constructed, will undoubtedly recognize the names of William Robertson and Gertrude Jekyll who pioneered the style in the late-1800s. While the approach has remained popular over the last 125 years, The Authentic Garden delves into how it has evolved from the 1800s to present day. Over the centuries, two design principles came to the forefront: first, create multi-seasonal gardens and, second, make them ecological. These principles, according to the authors, have helped to ensure the naturalistic approach endures as designers adapt English traditions to their own climates.

One of the most compelling examples of this evolution is California-based Elysian Landscapes’ design for a courtyard beside an Isabel Marant store in Los Angeles, California. Using native plants adapted to the dry southwest climate, the firm formed “casual massings,” out of “loose tufts of perennials” that are bright and exotic, but subtly pay homage to a more traditional planting system. Such examples, found throughout The Authentic Garden, provide inspiration to designers in all climates.

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Isabel Marant in Los Angeles by Elysian Landscapes / The Monacelli Press

Graphic Planting Design

Graphic planting design — which incorporate plants in large, often mono-color blocks to create a graphic effect of the landscape — were perhaps made most famous by Brazilian landscape architect, artist, and ecologist Roberto Burle Marx. Known for his affinity for strong forms and bright colors, Marx has inspired many generations of designers. However, as with other traditional planting styles, graphic planting design has evolved over the decades since Marx, becoming even more popular today, the authors assert.

Attracted to the strong aesthetic of these designs, as well as the ease of maintaining larger masses of plants, firms such as Sonoma, California-based Roche+Roche have made this style their own in the 21st century. Using massings of copper, blue-green, and lavender plants “that hold up well in strong light” at a Napa Valley residence, the firm created a memorable landscape striking within the pages of the book.

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Residence in Sonoma by Roche + Roche / The Monacelli Press

Subsequent chapters highlight more contemporary planting design styles, such as ecological, seasonal, and temporary planting. The authors show how climate-sensitive adaptations of traditional, European-style planting approaches can be achieved in gardens in dry and tropical climates, too.

Though the book is defined by its large, vibrant imagery, The Authentic Garden is more than just a coffee-table book. A must have for landscape architects and horticulturalists alike, it serves as reminder that even as beauty should be ecological today, there is still nothing wrong with adding in some “beauty for beauty’s sake.”

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OY/YO sculpture by Deborah Kass / Etienne Frossard/Courtesy of Two Trees Management Co, Vulture

OY/YO sculpture by Deborah Kass / Etienne Frossard/Courtesy of Two Trees Management Co, Vulture

New York Has Solved the Problem of Public Art. But at What Cost? Vulture, 12/17/15
“It is such a simple joy to feel the real rhythms of the city and see this perfect public sculpture, especially in an age when public space seems more and more turned by developers into private arcades for the privileged.”

Obama Center Chooses Architects Strong On Modernism, Innovative Thinking The Chicago Tribune, 12/21/15
“I also wonder when — or if — landscape architects will be brought into the process. Their involvement seems crucial, given that the presidential center will be built in an Olmsted park.”

Four Finalists Announced for Revamp of Pershing Square in Downtown LA Dezeen Magazine, 12/22/15
“Architecture studio Morphosis and landscape architect James Corner Field Operations are among the four teams that have been shortlisted to redesign one of Los Angeles’ oldest public parks.”

Building a More Resilient Landscape With PolycultureDallas News, 12/23/15
“Much research using native plants has focused on conserving and restoring open lands, but corporations, hospitals, restaurants, housing subdivisions and college campuses have many open areas — some are acres, others are small beds outside a door.”

The Green Shoots of Gardening in the UAE The National, 12/24/15
“In the Middle East the winter months are a time of growth and abundance in the garden and represent the peak of the growing season.”

Peter Latz: Rehabilitating Postindustrial Landscapes – The New York Times, 12/30/15
“The landscape architect Peter Latz grew up amid the ruins of postwar Germany in Saarland, a coal- and steel-producing region whose bombed-out factories and mines would inspire his work.”

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Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA / Ten Eyck Landscape Architecture Inc

Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA / George Brainard

Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA, is founder and principal of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc. Her firm of 12 has won numerous national ASLA awards. Interview conducted at the ASLA 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Texas seems to be just coming out of a severe four-year drought. What has the drought taught Texas about water management?

The drought has taught Texas they don’t have enough water for all the people and for growing agriculture. Texas wants to attract more people and industry. But if you attract more people, you’ve got to have water. Texas’s solution is to fund more infrastructure projects that bring water to the people — the Texas Rainy Day Fund, which has $2 billion for water management projects. They will give low interest rate loans to towns or cities to bring water or improve their water supply.

By the way, I don’t think we’re over the drought, even though El Nino has definitely hit.

As you just mentioned, Texas has passed this fund with $2 billion for water management. Is it enough? As a landscape architect, what does it mean for you?

No, I don’t think it’s enough.

I’ve always thought water is precious. In our projects, we make people aware of the path of water. We feel this is important anywhere, but especially in the arid Southwest where people long for a connection with water. Our projects have been a source of inspiration, not only for residential homeowners but also cities and college campuses. That’s the role we play. We can make communities aware that water is a precious resource and that they need to take care of water, not waste it on lawns. Our projects have to be beautiful and sustainable.

I usually work on sites that have immediate concerns with either no water or in a year like this with flooding water rushing off existing transportation systems into these last little shreds of remaining nature, and so we try to improve these systems, just one project at a time.

Significant amounts of groundwater have been used during the drought. Landscape architects are coming up with ways to recharge groundwater, even in urban areas. What will work in Texas? How can groundwater recharge be made more visible or even beautiful?

In Texas, if you own a property, you own the water rights to anything underneath your property. The rivers and streams are owned by the state of Texas. You have to get special permits to use that water. But, basically, in Texas you can still drill a well. There’s not a ton of regulation.

On my own street in Austin, I know of five homeowners who have dug wells. They’ll put signs out in their front yard that, “we’re watering with well water, so we’re okay. We can use as much water as much as we want.” This is just bizarre to me. We’ve still got lots of people with great big lawns. Now that we’re getting all this rain they think it’s perfectly okay to keep them. It’s just going to be a long, hard process.

In all of our projects, we try to slow water down and let it percolate down. I do this even in my own yard and garden. The whole front yard, which is good-sized, is designed to be a sponge to take it down. The more of these sponge gardens that get published, the more projects people see, it will help.

Sponge residential garden / Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc.

Sponge residential garden / Paul Hester

We’re also trying to get people to appreciate the beauty of drought and appreciate brown. It’s a gorgeous color. Golden colors. We just appreciate that there are seasons when things look a little haggard, just like me. It’s just like part of life. We need to come up with a new kind of beauty that people can have — a resilient, tough landscape that has a harsh beauty unique to its region.

Beautiful drought landscape / Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc.

Beautiful drought landscape / Terry Moore

In a number of communities in Texas with severe water challenges, it came down to providing water for endangered species or humans. Where do you see the balance?

What can I say? People are having too many children. I hate to sound so rude, but there’s too many people. We’ve got to be satisfied with one or two. Of course I’m the oldest of five, so I love a big family, don’t get me wrong. It’s just there are just so many people, and they use too many resources.

Balance between the wildlife and the humans? Seems like the government is going to probably pick humans. There needs to be a balance, but I couldn’t begin to tell you how we’re going to figure that out.

In your own projects, you’re now even harvesting condensation from air conditioning systems. With your new project at the University of Texas at Austin Belo Center for New Media, you designed a fascinating system. Could you tell me how that works?

In Texas, we have humidity and also have tons of air conditioning. The air conditioning coils create this condensation, a byproduct of a building that typically goes into the sewer. Because of my experience in Arizona, I’ve learned to appreciate every drop of water and look for every little way to honor that memory of water in the landscape.

We made the whole Belo Center garden about the path of water. We were able to convince the Belo Center for New Media to harvest that the condensate along with the stormwater that hit the roof. The condensate and the stormwater go into these three cisterns for irrigation, but when those are full, a valve shuts, and the water then goes through our water fountain, a linear biofilter runnel, where we have native Juncus growing. It’s a great element in the plaza, but it also tells an interesting story about reusing the water that a building produces.

University of Texas at Austin Belo Center for New Media garden / Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc.

University of Texas at Austin Belo Center for New Media garden / Bill Timmerman

Now, water departments will tell you, “we could have used that water to dissolve the solvents and things in our sewer system and all that.” So, again, is it really an end-all solution? No, it isn’t. It’s a way to use water that isn’t processed by the city and it calls attention to forgotten water.

As you’ve described, your projects make water flow visible in the landscape. For example, your landscape at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) campus has this series of vegetated arroyos or rivers. Why is making water visible so important?

Our project at UTEP, a campus that was defined by its architecture and abundance of asphalt, is set in a little mountain hillside in the Chihuahuan Desert. They had lost all connection with their fantastic place. The Chihuahuan Desert is a beautiful desert. It was more about really connecting the campus to their place, and creating a sense of pride of their unique spot in the world.

We looked at historic photos of the campus. When it was first built, there were many arroyos, but the campus evolved to become a car-centric campus, with acres of asphalt. We were lucky enough to peel all that off, reshape the land, and carve some of those arroyos back in, in order to slow that water down as it traverses through campus. When they do get rain, as little as they get, it comes in major, epic storms, so the new arroyos and acequias help to absorb and slow the water down.

UTEP campus / Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc.

UTEP campus / Terry Moore

UTEP has the largest Hispanic student population of any university in the country. They’re just the greatest kids. It was just a blast to give them a heart to their campus, embraced by these arroyos and this central gathering space. The new landscape just celebrates them. It celebrates where they’re from, where their ancestors are from.

We used all the native andesite rock from regrading and native Chihuahuan plants to create these arroyos and, now, you can’t believe the birds and butterflies on this campus.

People’s first impression of El Paso is typically the uninspiring view of industry as they drive I-10. Except for the mountain views, it’s not flattering or reflective of this amazing city. We’re showing the beauty of this place and hopefully instilling pride. It’s had a great impact so far, so that’s exciting. And it’s all working.

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An aerial view of Yanweizhou Park, which opened in 2014 and won the World Landscape of the Year prize for 2015. / City Lab

An aerial view of Yanweizhou Park, which opened in 2014 and won the World Landscape of the Year prize for 2015. / CityLab

Why a More Naturalistic Outlook Is the Future of Garden Design Architectural Digest, 11/18/15
“A new book explores trends in contemporary landscape architecture that are rooted in the past.”

Neighborhood Parks Play More Into Nature’s Hands The Houston Chronicle, 11/18/15
“Nature-themed parks are becoming more prevalent in Houston’s master-planned communities as developers respond to demand from homebuyers for amenities centered on nature and healthy living.”

Why China Wants to Build Something Called “Sponge Cities”Citylab, 11/23/15
“China’s central government has an ambitious green infrastructure plan. But will the results live up to the rhetoric?”

Plan for Fremont Park Overhaul Slated for Glendale City Council Consideration – The Los Angeles Times, 11/24/15
“Fremont Park — Glendale’s oldest park — is poised for a major overhaul that will include a new community building, soccer field and pickleball courts after a big push from local fans of the sport popular among middle-aged adults and seniors.”

Public Outcry Continues Over Chao Phraya PromenadeThe Bangkok Post, 11/25/15
“Civic groups and academics renewed their opposition to the Chao Phraya promenade project at a seminar on Wednesday, calling for the expensive plan to be reviewed.”

Green Walls The Guardian, 11/28/15
“Sometimes called living walls, green facades, bio walls, eco walls or vertical gardens, green walls are a dynamic way to green a vertical built surface.”

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"Parc de Bagatelle's rose garden was designed by the landscape architect Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier, who also designed the Maria Luisa gardens in Seville." / Getty Images, Vogue

Parc de Bagatelle’s rose garden was designed by the landscape architect Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier / Getty Images, Vogue

Landscape Architects See Creations Evolve over Time The San Francisco Chronicle, 11/3/15
“In our world that craves quick-draw drama, the most rewarding urban spaces can take years to show their stuff.”

Daniel Bennett on Landscape Architecture and Liveable Cities The Fifth Estate, 11/5/15
“The Australian Institute of Landscape Architects’ newly appointed president Daniel Bennett aims to arm the organization’s members with sound economic arguments for the importance of landscape in achieving livable and sustainable cities.”

For Landscape Architect Kate Orff, Sunday Morning Means Having to Say ‘Sorry!’ The New York Times, 11/6/15
“Kate Orff, a landscape architect, first captured the public’s attention in 2010 with her passionate promotion of a plan proposed by her firm, Scape, to bring oysters back to New York Harbor (the bivalves filter water and form reefs that can buffer against storm surges).”

Rethinking Maintenance of Urban Trees The Landscape Architecture News Feed, 11/9/15
“If you’re a municipal arborist, you probably got into the field of tree care because you love working with trees and you could make a modest living. You know that that in cities maintenance is the only way that trees get large – and that size matters when we talk about the kind of ecosystem services we want street trees to provide.”

Revamp Possible for Way Hong Kong’s Trees Are Handled The South China Morning Post, 11/9/15
“The much criticized way in which the authorities handle the city’s trees could be in for a revamp when a newly commissioned study is released late next year, according to the government’s new chief landscaper.”

Highland Park Considers Renaming Park Due to Designer Jensen’s Views The Chicago Tribune, 11/10/15
“Landscape designer Jens Jensen’s legacy as a creator of open space can be found in the Chicago park system, the Cook County forest preserves, the Illinois state parks and the Indiana Dunes.”

First Look at Ludlam Trail: A Green Dream amid Traffic-Clogged Southwest Miami The Miami Herald, 11/10/15
“During Ludlam Trail Fall Fest, a community event held over the weekend at A.D. Barnes Park in southwest Miami, people of all ages biked the peak of a 12-foot high grassy hill, extending just over six miles in length, where the train tracks from Florida East Coast Railway used to lay.”

Explore a Landscape Architect’s Most Inspirational Secret Gardens and Quiet Parks From Around the World Vogue, 11/13/15
“The job of a landscape architect is to dream up fantastical hedges, forests, and flowerbeds. It’s a task informed by imagination, of course, but also by a deep understanding of horticultural history.”

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The Xixi Wetland Estate in Hangzhou is the latest housing project by David Chipperfield in China / Simon Menges, Wallpaper.com

The Xixi Wetland Estate in Hangzhou is the latest housing project by David Chipperfield in China / Simon Menges, Wallpaper.com

The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut The New York Times, 10/16/15
“A group of friends and neighbors thought that this area could use a new community center with a spiritual underpinning. So they built one. But Grace Farms, as the project is called, will never be mistaken for a modest Amish barn-raising. In this corner of Connecticut, budgets are less tight than elsewhere.”

Wild Gardens That Grew Out From WashingtonThe Washington Post, 10/19/15
“Washington doesn’t export a lot of aesthetic ideas, and the exceptions only prove the rule. Yes, the city can lay claim to the Washington Color School, more than a half-century ago, but that always feels a bit like the region’s claim to culinary fame, the crab cake: predictable, ubiquitous and uninspiring.”

Putting the Wilderness Back in Houston Arboretum The Houston Chronicle, 10/26/15
“The incessant hum of Loop 610 traffic permeates the western edge of the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, like waves crashing on a beach. Just 75 feet from the state’s busiest freeway, rabbits scamper through the underbrush, purple beautyberries cling to the drooping canes of bright green plants and a dry, woodsy scent hangs in the air.”

Verdant Village: David Chipperfield Completes the Xixi Wetland Estate Wallpaper, 10/26/15
“For two thousand years, Hangzhou has been celebrated for its incomparable tableau of unruffled lakes at the foot of green hills, and ancient waterways lined with gardens, temples, and graceful buildings designed by a succession of dynasties enamored with the landscape.”

Landscape OperationsThe Architect’s Newspaper, 10/27/15
“An ongoing debate resurfaced at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. One critic in particular, Patrik Schumacher of Zaha Hadid Architects, criticized the curators, saying that it seems that “contemporary architecture [has] ceased to exist, the discipline’s guilt and bad conscience has sapped its vitality, and driven it to self-annihilation.”

America’s Green Giant The New York Review of Books, 11/15
“The nearly universal acclaim that greeted the High Line—the linear greenway built between 2006 and 2014 atop an abandoned elevated railway trestle on Manhattan’s lower west side—reconfirmed the transformative effect parks can have on the quality of urban life.”

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Wolfgang Oehme and James van Sweden / Photograph © Volkmar Wentzel, ca. 1990, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Wolfgang Oehme and James van Sweden / Photograph © Volkmar Wentzel, ca. 1990, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

The default American landscape before game-changing landscape architecture firm Oehme van Sweden & Associates (OvS) came along was a great expanse of lawn, really an ecological wasteland, with perhaps a fringe of flowers. But all of that changed with James van Sweden and Wolgang Oehme’s New American Garden style, which burst onto the scene in the early 1960s. A new exhibition at the National Building Museum (NBM) in Washington, D.C. honors this still-evolving approach inspired by Native American landscapes. As NBM explains, “the New American Garden is characterized by large swaths of grasses and fields of perennials.” The style re-creates the seasonal splendor of the American meadow while “celebrating its inherent ecological, sustainable, aesthetic, and ornamental values.” Eric Groft, FASLA, a principal at OvS, one of the firm’s second generation leaders, added that this approach was “sustainable before it was even called that.”

When it first appeared, the New American Garden was a departure from landscape architect Dan Kiley’s formal geometric Modernism. As Groft explained, “Oeme and van Sweden wanted to overwhelm you with horticulture, movement, and color.” van Sweden once told him, “all color is good.”

Linda Jewell, FASLA, a professor of landscape architecture at University of California at Berkeley and fellow at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., said the exhibition “shows that the world needs color and life more than lawns. It also shows us who they were personally. It’s exhilarating.”

The exhibition, which is the largest monographic landscape architecture one in NBM’s history, takes visitors from their early residential landscapes to their more ambitious civic works. We see 28 of OvS’s residential and civic projects, explained with 50 fantastic large-scale photographs, original plans and drawings, and the historic artworks that played an important role in their development. Three generations of OvS landscape architects’ work are included. Given OvS designed more than 1,000 landscapes since 1975, it’s clear how much work went into curation.

Charles Birnbaum, FASLA, president of the Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF), which partnered with NBM to organize and design the exhibition, pointed out some of their most significant works, focusing first on the now-famous residential landscape, the Rosenberg Residence in Water Mill, New York, which “galvanized the world of landscape architecture, put OvS on the map, and made the Rosenbergs famous.”

Rosenberg Residence / Photograph © Andre Baranowski, 2014, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Rosenberg Residence / Photograph © Andre Baranowski, 2014, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Birnbaum then asked us to focus on the Federal Reserve Board Garden in Washington, D.C., which was a “hinge point” that showed how the New American Garden aesthetic could be scaled up in a civic setting.

Federal Reserve Board Garden / Photograph © Amy Lamb, 2015, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

Federal Reserve Board Garden / Photograph © Amy Lamb, 2015, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

Groft explained how the New American Garden style continues to evolve. “It has been changing since its inception. Landscapes are ephemeral, always evolving.” As an example, he mentioned the Slifka Beach House in Sagaponack, New York, which is the project nearest and dearest to him, as he has guided its growth and change for decades. “It’s my life’s work, in a way. It’s the garden I’ve learned the most from over the years.”

Slifka Beach House / Photograph © Sara Cedar Miller, 2015, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Slifka Beach House / Photograph © Sara Cedar Miller, 2015, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Another way the New American Garden style is evolving: OvS is always discovering and applying new plants, even from places as far as South Africa.

But for Groft, this evolution hasn’t been spurred by our shifting climate. “Climate change doesn’t really change anything for us. We’ve always taken out lawns and planted perennials that require very little maintenance. Oehme and van Sweden were always deeply focused on sustainability and managing water using perennials.”

Sadly, Birnbaum said many of OvS’s landscapes are under threat. Pershing Park in Washington, D.C., which OvS created with landscape architect M. Paul Friedberg, FASLA, may get bulldozed if a new National World War I Centennial Commission has its way.

Pershing Park / Photograph © Volkmar Wentzel, undated, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Pershing Park / Photograph © Volkmar Wentzel, undated, courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation

And some 9 of 21 of OvS’s gardens featured in Oehme, van Sweden, and Susan Rademacher’s important book, Bold Romantic Gardens, have already disappeared. Birnbaum explained that this is the 25th anniversary of the book, which was “revolutionary and completely changed how landscape architects used plants.”

He wants to see many of OvS’s landscapes added to the National Register of Historic Places and documented through the Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS). “We need a real strategy for keeping these places around. This exhibition will build awareness, but we need to include owners and use tools, like easements, to protect these landscapes.”

Explore a companion website for the exhibition created by TCLF.

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The lights in Buffalo Bayou Park change with the phases of the moon. / Photo: Buffalo Bayou Partnership

The lights in Buffalo Bayou Park change with the phases of the moon. / Buffalo Bayou Partnership

Lighting and Leaves at Buffalo Bayou Park The Houston Chronicle, 10/1/15
“Come fall — not the one on the calendar, but the Houston version that kicks in around December — the cypresses will glow copper. Come spring, the redbuds will sprout purple and pink, Houston’s version of the famous cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C. This is what landscape architect Scott McCready of SWA says is in store at Buffalo Bayou Park.”

A Champion for Balboa ParkSan Diego Downtown News, 10/2/15
“When landscape architect Samuel Parsons, one of Olmsted’s protégés, designed Balboa Park in 1901, it was considered a municipal park to serve San Diego’s population of less than 50,000, not a destination park that would have the 14 million visitors a year it does today, making it the fifth most-visited park in the nation.”

L.A.’s Olympic Ambitions Could Boost River Restoration – But at What Cost? The Los Angeles Times, 10/4/15
“For years, politicians, activists and community groups have been laying the groundwork for a transformation of the Los Angeles River, one that would rip up stretches of concrete and add parks, wetlands and other natural spaces.”

Substance, Style, and the Success of the 606 Planetizen, 10/5/15
”At a time when the direct link between public open space and public health is more established fact than hopeful supposition, and cities are increasingly willing to invest in their urban landscapes, the focused program and straightforward design of the 606’s centerpiece, the Bloomingdale Trail, provides an exhilarating breath of fresh air into an urban realm in need of a few good surprises.”

An Inside Look at Denver’s Best Outside Spaces – The Denver Post, 10/9/15
“Parks can seem like static places in busy cities, especially Denver circa 2015, where everything around them is growing at full speed. But open spaces, such as plazas, pedestrian malls and public campuses, are constantly changing, too, just at their own pace.”

Growing Chicago: A Flourishing City in a Garden The Chicago Tribune, 10/9/15
“In 2013 we asked readers for ideas to help Chicago prosper in our New Plan of Chicago series. Many pitched the same smart thought: Why not divert empty or underused land to urban farms? Let oases of fresh produce flourish in food deserts. Don’t force local residents to trek miles for fresh kale or collards.”

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void

Luminous void / 88888 Studio, via DesignBoom

Sunday Conversation with Shane Coen, Landscape Architect The Star Tribune, 9/19/15
“Minneapolis-based Coen + Partners, a small firm in the Warehouse District, received the nation’s highest honor in design, the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian National Design Award. Its founder, Shane Coen, now finds himself on a larger national stage and with a louder voice in the design world.”

Green Peace: The Healing Power of Parks for Young and OldAARP.com, 9/22/15
“Parks are public spaces, but they can be very personal ones, too. They can be homes to our daily rituals — from morning jogs to dog walks — as well as our milestone celebrations. They also can be our quiet places of solace after a long day or after a deep loss, as I experienced.”

Frank Gehry Draws Ire for Joining Los Angeles River Restoration Project The New York Times, 9/23/15
“Yet none of Mr. Gehry’s farewell enterprises seem more daunting — and fraught — than his involvement in rebuilding the Los Angeles River, a bleak and dispiriting 51-mile channel that winds its way through fields, suburbs, dark city corners and industrial wastelands from the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Ocean.”

A Garden Where You’d Least Expect ItThe Wall Street Journal, 9/27/15
“A far more ambitious project alighted last week, when Diana Balmori, a celebrated landscape architect and urban designer, oversaw the launch of a floating landscape at the foot of the Whole Foods parking lot that overlooks the canal.”

88888 Sculpts Luminous Void Within the Water Surrounding the Castle of Horst  DesignBoom, 9/29/15
“In the water surrounding the ancient castle of horst in belgium, 88888 studio — the collaboration of karel burssens and jeroen verrecht — have sculpted into the earth, forming an unexpected, abstract interruption in the natural landscape.”

The Cultural Landscape Foundation Releases New Pioneers Oral History with Landscape Architect Nicholas Quennell – The Cultural Landscape Foundation, 9/30/15
“Quennell, in practice for more than 50 years, is esteemed for his work on iconic New York City parks including the Central Park Children’s Zoo and Fort Tryon Park, his innovative collaborations with artists such as Alice Aycock, Barbara Kruger, and Maya Lin, and his role in the civic realm as President of the Art Commission and with other organizations.”

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