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Archive for the ‘Gardens’ Category

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Nemophilas / Kobaken on Flickr

Imagine being immersed in a sea of blue, but on land. At the Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki, Japan, Nemophilas (or baby blue eyes) create a stunning, natural blanket of technicolor, like a set from the Wizard of Oz. This effect is called the “Nemophila Harmony.”

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According to Bored Panda, there are some 4.5 million baby blue eyes in bloom through May each year.

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Nemophilas / Kobaken on Flickr

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Nemphilas / Atsushi Motoyama on Flickr

The 190-hectare garden is also known for its vast tulip, poppy, zinia, lavender, and Narcissus fields.

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Tulip fields / Ryougo Ohtani on Flickr

What stunned us were the puff-ball red Kochia, which seem right out of a Dr. Seuss book.

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Kochia field / Jejustinkumar on Flickr

The kochia is a herb native to Eurasia, but it’s commonly found in North America, too, where it’s part of desert and grassland ecosystems. It’s also known as burningbush or ragweed.

If you are in Japan, Hitachi provides a useful flower calendar that explains the year-round bloom times.

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1. Pavilion Vista

Pavilion Vista / Longwood Gardens

Known for its exquisitely-crafted formal gardens, Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania has just unveiled its new meadow garden, 86 acres showcasing “best practices in ecological garden design with artistic interventions.” Designed by Jonathan Alderson Landscape Architects with a team of local artisans, the meadow garden features three miles of walking trails and boardwalks that guide visitors from the woodland edge through sweeps of native wildflowers, then along to the wetlands surrounding Hourglass Lake. To guide the landscape experience, landscape architect Jonathan Alderson, ASLA, accentuated natural patterns that celebrate the meadow’s ever-changing nature. Also, all structures — from the entrance gate and learning pavilions to the bridges and boardwalks — were crafted with local materials to reflect Brandywine Valley culture, history, and ecology.

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Meadow bridge / Longwood Gardens

“The new meadow garden is an exciting departure from the more formal gardens,” said Longwood Gardens director Paul Redman. “Guests will experience a bucolic Brandywine Valley landscape and discover the beauty and variety of native and naturally-producing plants.” Visitors will gain an “appreciation for the inter-connectedness of plants and wildlife.”

To augment the existing plant varieties already thriving in the meadow and woodland edge, over 100 species were added to create sweeps of color, texture, and diversity. These plants permeate the landscape and provide interest and habitat benefits in every season.

In spring, woody plants like Eastern redbud and flowering dogwood combine with an herbaceous groundcover layer.

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Spring in the meadow / Longwood Gardens

In summer, meadow species provide visual scenes and attract pollinators like the monarch butterfly.

5. Blazing Star_Daniel Traub (summer)

Blazing Star in summer / Daniel Traub

While in the fall, native asters and meadow grasses blend with the autumn foliage of woodland-edge species of maple and oak.

7. Fall Meadow

Fall meadow / Longwood Gardens

Even in winter, dry seed pods and grasses provide subtle beauty and texture while providing important habitat amid the snow.

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Meadow Garden Winter / Longwood Gardens

Alderson designed the meadow garden as a showcase for ecological design. The new meadow “minimizes environmentally-destructive impacts by integrating itself with living processes. Land stewardship techniques are implemented with the goal of enhancing and maintaining the resilience of the existing native plant communities.”

By doubling the original meadow’s size, several species that require sizable habitat to complete their life cycle and migratory needs (the Eastern Meadowlark, for example) will have the opportunity to thrive. The plant and soil communities also function as dynamic, living water filters for the ponds, headwater streams, and wetlands throughout the gardens. “This meadow is a direct reflection of how the human and natural words interact, offering a valuable ecological and cultural experience.”

Longwood Gardens founder Pierre DuPont’s left a legacy of support for education. Following in this tradition, the meadow garden is a place for discovery and learning. Four pavilions frame vistas and provide gathering points for school groups and other visitors. The historic Webb Farmhouse has been restored and will serve as a gallery and interpretive center reflecting the site’s intricate history

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Webb House / Longwood Gardens

Efforts were made during the Webb Farmhouse restoration, along with the construction of boardwalks and other structures, to source local, environmentally friendly materials. Reclaimed historic wood beams and floor boards were used to restore the Webb House; benches are constructed from fallen trees on the Longwood property; and much of the Garden’s hardscape features stone sourced from nearby Avondale, Pennsylvania. Local masons, carpenters, blacksmiths, and others handcrafted the structures found in the landscape.

4. Artisan Blacksmith_DANIELTRAUB

Artisan Blacksmith / Daniel Traub

Guests are welcome throughout the year to enjoy self-guided walks or to schedule school-group visits. Meadow days in August, September, and October will offer additional opportunities for fun and exploration.

In the meantime, check out this video and start thinking about how to get yourself to Pennsylvania for this Americana landscape experience.

Yoshi Silverstein is the ASLA 2014 communications intern. He is a Masters in Landscape Architecture candidate at the University of Maryland. He focuses on landscape experience and outdoor learning environments.

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Fisher House / My Life So Far blog

“Democratic design is inclusive, affordable, functional, usable, practical, non-stigmatizing, accessible, attainable, and aesthetically pleasing,” said Naomi Sachs, ASLA, landscape architect and founder of the Therapeutic Landscapes Network, at the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) conference in New Orleans. Furthermore, democratic design is “responsive to both ecological and community needs. It grows up from the community.” A democratic design process is then fully collaborative, including all stakeholders, but with a focus on those least acknowledged.

Sachs’ colleagues presented a few interesting examples that illustrate the idea of democratic design for therapeutic gardens:

Daniel Winterbottom, FASLA, a landscape architect and professor at the University of Washington; Amy Wagenfeld, a occupational therapist; along with students from the landscape architecture department at the University of Washington, designed a new healing garden for Fisher House, a facility at the Veteran’s Affairs hospital in Puget Sound for loved ones of those undergoing intensive surgery.

Unfortunately, the garden is found in a parking lot, within a sea of cars. On top of that, the original garden had “poor way-finding, so you felt a loss of control as you entered the place,” said Wagenfeld. It was a place where you have “very little say over your environment.” Most visitors are also coming from rural areas to the city so “they already feel a sense of displacement.”

Winterbottom said he and his students conducted intensive research, using focus groups, games, simulations. Guests of Fisher House were shown different photos and asked their preferences. They were asked to rank designs. Others simply sketched their ideas.

The new garden, which was then designed and built based on the guests’ feedback in just 10 weeks, features vegetable and fruit plants, “creating a domestic feeling.” Given many people are there for months, “we wanted to bring an icon of home — the kitchen garden.” Emphasizing the democratic aspects of the design, the team created multiple types of planting beds. There are those for people who want to sit and those for who want to stand. There’s even a wheelchair-accessible one. Visitors can plant whatever they want, too.

There’s a new children’s play area. “The kid’s area is kid-sized.” There’s a walking trail that loops around the garden, too. “The goal is to deal with the whole family,” said Winterbottom.

The designers created a fully wheelchair-accessible rain garden that treats water falling on the site. Within this area, there is a sculpture that is about “mending broken hearts and bodies, bringing them together.”

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Fisher House / Lyon Landscape Architects

The new garden is set up so that people can interact or just be by themselves. “There are a range of spaces, so you can find your own appropriate one.” Wagenfeld said it’s widely used. “There’s a sense of escape in the garden.”

According to Winterbottom, some of the challenges creating the garden were eliciting participation among guests, who were all going through some emotionally taxing times. The design team was also really young. “With young designers, it’s all about them, not about other people.” Lastly, perhaps the biggest challenge was some long-time staff members, “who often berated patients” and thought they knew what the visitors wanted, when in fact they did not.

In another example, we learn about Nikkei Manor, an assisted living facility for Japanese Americans of the internment camp generation in Seattle. Many residents of the manor feel a sense of “displacement, loneliness, abandonment, and loss of identity” when they move into assisted care, said Wagenfeld.

The original idea was to create a Japanese garden, said Winterbottom, but “to even touch a Japanese garden, you need about 10-20 years of experience. To design one, you need to find a master.” So he and 17 landscape architecture students created a Pacific Northwest-style Japanese garden for just $75,000 in just one semester.

Every space in the garden is easily visible, as many residents have dementia. There are railings everywhere — both for security and exercise.

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Nikkei Manor garden / Daniel Winterbottom

Wagenfeld said the space has “active flexibility, with a stage for performances.” The garden uses “universal design principles to create a sense of familiarity.” It’s also a popular spot for neighborhood gatherings. (see more images).

Really, it sounds like democratic design is just good design.

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Lavender field in Provence / Wikipedia

We can read about how sensory experiences in landscapes work on our minds by exploring the latest neuroscience, but there’s no replacement for just going out an experiencing a place. “Our senses snap us back to the here and now,” said D. Fairchild Ruggles, a professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, at a conference on sound and scent in the garden at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. One question, though, is: how can we use our senses in a place that no longer exists? This was the topic of discussion over a few days, as landscape historians explored the limits of words and pictures when describing landscapes of the past.

Ruggles said “vision has a privileged place in architectural history.” This is because too often architectural history is dedicated to “the pursuit of permanence.” In landscape architecture history, the most common visual is the site plan or aerial view. “But this visual representation doesn’t capture the sound or scent of the place.”

For centuries, Arab poets discussed the sensory experience of the garden. Unfortunately, today, “smells are elusive. Other than saying something is fragrant, what can we say? We compare it to something else. Something smells like… We have no sophisticated vocabulary.”

John Dixon Hunt, a landscape historian at the University of Pennsylvania, picked up the discussion, saying essentially that words and images fail us when we are trying to evoke the sound and smell of a place. “We can’t explain one person’s experiences to another. They are so subjective.” He said two people may walk through a landscape and have a “shared experience but will have different articulations, using different words, just as two painters viewing the same scene will paint it differently. Everyone has their own take. We are on our own in life.”

Given words fail, the experience of being in a historic place is lost. “We have to be depressed looking at the past because we can’t get to it. Modern landscape architects can only try to impart back or transpose things backwards.”

Still, Hunt called for a greater effort to communicate the experience of being in a place, at least in landscape and garden writing today. He complained that writers and critics focus too much on the form of a space than the experience of being there. “We must evade simple reliance on architectural forms. Movement determines mood. The mood is lost when we just look at forms.”

This challenge is not lost on the poor writers who must explain what a place sounds and smells like. “How do you capture the sound of water?” He said even Shakespeare, who described a garden as “deft of sound and scent,” really told his readers, “one must go there to enjoy.”

Hunt described a number of historic and contemporary works of landscape architecture that highlight scent. For example, the lavender fields of France “assault the senses.” The scent garden at the University of Toronto, with its aromatic pavilions, has significant impact because of its “limited focus.” There, the “blind can smell and touch.”

As to whether the impact of a sound or scent can be measured, Hunt wondered whether some things in life are “immeasurable,” simply beyond our reach. He argued that may be a good thing: “it’s terribly important to have something in one’s life that you can’t grasp.”

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Dallas Museum of Art by Dan Kiley / Alan Ward, TCLF

In a lecture at the National Building Museum on the legacy of Modern landscape architect Dan Kiley, Gary Hilderbrand, FASLA, one of the founders of landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand, said of Kiley, “we share a love of order, a disdain of ornament, a love of common things — the field, the hedgerow, the tree canopy. Like him, I want to return these all to glory.” Introduced by Charles Birnbaum, FASLA, head of The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF), who connected Hilderbrand to the rich Modern traditions of Kiley, the focus of a new exhibition organized by TCLF at NBM, Hilderbrand talked about both Kiley’s projects and his own, illuminating some parellels between their work in interesting ways.

For Hilderbrand, Kiley was part of the movement that steered landscape architecture away from its traditional focus on the garden. Kiley, and his fellow students Garrett Eckbo and James Rose, displaced the garden, suggesting that teaching gardens to graduate students was “disagreeably aristocratic and irrelevant.” They all felt a “greater urgency for public landscapes, the infrastructure for urbanization.” Whether their aim was explicit or not, “they caused the garden to vanish for a long time.” (Except, as Hilderbrand noted later, perhaps Kiley never fully vanquished the garden, returning to it with many small gardens and his famous Miller Garden, which created a “singular sense of modern living.”)

A Modernist, Kiley wanted to distill landscapes into their core elements, removing any excess. “He loved ordinary things like the field and the forest canopy, and he made them extraordinary.” As an example, Hilderbrand showed Kiley’s Dallas Museum of Art, with its stark rows of trees (see image above). “For Kiley, it was totally natural to plant trees in rows; it wasn’t contrived. How can that be? It’s because it’s natural for humans to plant trees in rows, like orchards, so the trees can be more easily grown, watered, pruned, and harvested. Planting in a grid is then the most natural thing.”

Kiley used Modern techniques to create a paired-down yet also heightened sense of nature. Another site, Fountain Place in Dallas is “like being in a cypress forest; it smells and feels like a forest. It’s truly remarkable.”

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Fountain Place, Dallas / Alan Ward, TCLF

The influence of Kiley can be seen in Reed Hilderbrand’s own thoughtful, minimalist projects, with their focus on the essential. Hilderbrand gave the crowd of more than 200 a tour of four sites:

The Central Park Wharf in Boston is about taking infrastructure and creating an “inhabitable landscape, a work of living architecture.” For Reed Hilderbrand, the challenge was, “how do we make the surface of this park feel alive?”

To create that feeling that the Wharf park is alive, they had to build “below ground-infrastructure.” Hilderbrand used an apt metaphor here: “You can’t create a great meal without a great staff in the kitchen.” A structure was put in place to hold up the ground and seating areas. A medium of soil, with drains that form a trellis-like system, maintain precise amounts of moisture for the 25 oak trees planted. “Sensors let us know if the trees are getting enough water.”

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ASLA 2011 Professional General Design Honor Award. Central Wharf Park / Reed Hilderbrand

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This complex system made simple really worked: the trees, which were planted large, experienced a phenomenal 10 feet of growth since they were put in the ground.

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ASLA 2011 Professional General Design Honor Award. Central Wharf Park / Reed Hilderbrand

Central Park Wharf is now “instantly recognizable for its cover canopy, with lights wired through the trees.”

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ASLA 2011 Professional General Design Honor Award. Central Wharf Park / Charles Mayer Photography

A second project, restoring the landscape around Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Texas, and then re-connecting it to the home, was challenging because the “landscape was highly degraded, a jungle, really.” But then, Reed Hilderbrand can see the “opportunity in anything.” The Beck House is a grand building in the vein of Johnson’s Lincoln Center. What was difficult was finding a way to make this fantastic home part of its surrounding landscape.

Hilderbrand said they ended up being critical of Johnson’s approach to the landscape, which was to cut it off and make it a source of panoramic views only. Their team brought trees into Johnson’s blank arcade, reduced the height of retaining walls, and built a flight of low, grassy stairs to pull the entrance outside of the building. The overall effect is to better root the building in its surrounding landscape, making it feel more like a piece of the place than disengaged from its environment.

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ASLA 2011 Professional Residential Design Honor Award. Beyond Pictorial: Revising Philip Johnson’s Monumental Beck House / Alan Ward

They then restored the creek and bridge, editing out invasive plants and trees, and set a series of long white planks that brought a further sense of order to the estate’s grounds.

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ASLA 2011 Professional Residential Design Honor Award. Beyond Pictorial: Revising Philip Johnson’s Monumental Beck House / Reed Hilderbrand

Hilderbrand then took us to Marshcourt, a historic manor by Sir Edwin Luytens in England, where his firm is reintegrating the surrounding chalk landscape back into the place. The buildings’ walls are made of chalk and flint. The nearby chalk quarry proved to be an inspiration for what Reed Hilderbrand did: create the sense that once is driving through a “cut of chalk,” then going through a “door,” upon which you open up into the copse. “The contractors thought we were out of our minds compacting chalk into steep slopes.” But the effect is worth it: the meadows planted on top of the slopes are beautiful.

Lastly, Old Quarry, a project on the Long Island Sound in southern Connecticut, tells the story of finding order in an old stone quarry. Paths are like jetties. Footpaths were created across paths of rocks. Reed Hilderbrand used a simple, coastal plant palette. Hilderbrand said this project took four years, and was like being a “kid in a sandbox.” Stone masons actually spent two years on site, forming the stone into patterns. “This was definitely a luxury.”

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ASLA 2012 Professional Residential Design Honor Award. Reordering Old Quarry / Charles Mayer Photography

According to Hilderbrand, all these examples prove that “a landscape architect never begins from scratch. We always begin with a story, maybe centuries of stories.” And those stories may not necessarily need to be understood by those seeing them. “Whether the experience is rational or emotional, we don’t have to understand everything behind a landscape.”

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American beech grove, Dumbarton Oaks Park / Jim Osen Photography

Unlike the 16 acres of formal gardens at Washington, D.C.’s Dumbarton Oaks, there are no remaining plans for Dumbarton Oaks Park, the wild garden that is its complement. Perhaps Beatrix Farrand, one of the most prominent landscape architects of the 20th century, laid out most of the design in response to the larger scale of the landscape and wilder conditions of the lower 27-acre parcel? But how does one know? And how does one restore and rehabilitate a landscape without the plan of the original designer?

One must read the traces that remain. As the cultural landscape report written by the National Park Service in 1999 describes, what remains at Dumbarton Oaks Park is rich enough to suggest the journey Farrand created.

There is a manipulated watercourse with 18 weirs, which harness the water flow through the park as well as create a rich sensory experience.

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Dumbarton Oaks Park / Jared Green

There is a path system that meanders the visitor though forest, stream, and meadow, creating a circuit of experience.

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Dumbarton Oaks Park path / Jared Green

There are the remains of stone-garden follies, which once provided shade and a moment to reflect on the land, the past, and the future.

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Dumbarton Oaks Park / Jared Green

In one circuit through the park, a visitor can experience all of these landscape moments. It’s a living work of art that provides a different journey for each visitor. Dumbarton Oaks Park is a living canvas upon which the light can change many times in one day.

Farrand designed landscapes and gardens with the deep understanding that they were not static but living, breathing, changing environments. She was capable of reading a site and creating a design that evolved from that understanding.

She was a self-taught master of proportion, texture, and horticultural form. At Princeton University, where she worked for 28 years, she mastered the simple elegance of a quadrangle with the use of vertical plant material, and panels of grass to keep the space open and defined by the edges of the buildings meeting the ground plane.

Dumbarton Oaks Park is a treasure because of this landscape architect’s vision. Farrand, though she was a founding member of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), was overlooked for many of the public park commissions in the first part of the century because she was a woman. Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., Jens Jensen, and others were selected instead. But it is our great fortune that her only remaining wild garden now belongs to us all.

And so it is with great respect of Farrand’s mastery that we work to reveal the design of this urban wilderness garden. We work within a framework of design that exists, while balancing the current site conditions, such as soil erosion and compaction and invasive plants.

In our signature project area, the removals of invasive trees, shrubs, and vines has opened up the sweeping views a visitor now experiences once he or she walks through the entrance gates. Here we see the beech grove stone wall after we enter…

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American beech grove wall, before restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

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American beech grove wall, during restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

…and, then, through the American Beech Grove…

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American beech grove, before restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

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American beech grove, after restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

…and up to the Northern Woodland in the distance.

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Bridge hollow, before restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

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Bridge hollow, during restoration / Ann Aldrich, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy

From bridge to bridge, one can now see the stream course running towards its wild neighbor, Rock Creek. The breathtaking scale of this silver-trunked grove of trees is made evident.

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Dumbarton Oaks Park Signature Project / Jim Osen Photography

Our efforts on a small scale are no less important. The recent replanting of a Black Gum tree in an existing tree pit notched into the Dumbarton Oaks wall will once again mark the entrance with its commanding trunk.

Farrand’s use of human-scale landscape markers to suggest a path, an intersection, or a view was highly attuned. They are still in evidence. From the human-scaled path — edged with stone and drifts of herbaceous planting or from under the cover of a wood arbor — Farrand developed views out to the larger landscapes beyond, such as the meadow and woods. Farrand carefully orchestrated the experience as one moved through the park.

To be successful in the restoration of this wild garden we must keep in the forefront of our minds the landscape scale and the human scale simultaneously. Farrand left us this legacy as a guide.

This guest post is by Liza Gilbert, ASLA, chair of the Signature Committee, Dumbarton Oaks Park Conservancy.

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Afterburn / Civilian Projects

Once again, the jury for the International Garden Festival, has picked some intriguing contemporary garden projects. Six new landscapes will appear during the festival, which is held at Reford Gardens, next to the Les Jardins de Métis in Quebec, from May through September. Nearly 300 proposals were submitted by 700 designers from 30 countries.

Afterburn by Civilian Projects, a Brooklyn-based art and architecture studio, features charred trees outlined in a grid formation (see image above). Civilian Projects describe the work as a “post-apocalyptic experience that allows visitors to see how nature renews by itself after a fire and how she manages to heal damaged landscapes.” One team member, Ksenia Kagner, is from landscape architecture firm James Corner Field Operations.

For Cone Garden, a team of designers from Livescape, which hails from Seoul, South Korea, have stuck orange construction cones upside-down into the earth. The cones will be filled with soil, becoming planters. Some cones will become seating. Others will “transit messages to passers-by.” For these designers, the cones represent “the never-ending construction, de-construction, and re-construction of our environment.”

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Cone Garden / Livescape

Canadian artists and designers Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster have created Line Garden, a responsive environment that will change based on user movement through the space. The garden features police tape, twined into new patterns. The team enjoys investigating “everyday urban situations and re-presenting them to be experienced anew.”

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Line Garden / Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster

In Méristème, a plant cell is blown up into a geodesic-dome-like formation people can enter. The piece is meant to remind us of the importance of plant life to human society. This installation was created by Châssi, a team from Montreal, Canada.

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Méristème / Châssi

Orange Secret by landscape architecture firm Nomad Studio from New York City is meant to play with our perception of open and closed spaces. A wooden wall provides a slit for viewing the garden, which prominently features all plants that bloom orange.

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Orange Secret / Nomad Studio

Lastly, the excellent Rotunda by Spanish designers at City Laboratory, will feature a black steel basin meant to slowly collect water, leaves, pollen over the summer. This accumulation will provide food for birds and insects, leading to the development of “new life in the garden.”

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Rotunda / City Laboratory

Since the festival started in 2000, 140 gardens have been exhibited at Les Jardins de Métis in Quebec. Check out these new ones from May 31 to September 28. See more images at DesignBoom.

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Botanist and garden designer Patrick Blanc, who usually stays just a few stories off the ground with his densely-planted vertical gardens, is now moving higher and higher. Working with starchitect Jean Nouvel, Blanc has been sheathing two 380-feet-tall buildings in green. What once looked like a fanciful graduate school student’s thesis has now become reality: vertical gardens are now climbing up skyscrapers, too.

One Central Park, a residential tower in Sydney expected to open this winter, has plants and vines climbing up its glass facade. Blanc told Dezeen: “The building, together with my vertical garden, will be an architectural work floating in the air, with plants growing on the walls – it will create a very special result that will be very new to Sydney.”

The greenery is meant to extend the nearby park onto the buildings, creating a verdant district. According to The Architect’s Newspaper, “the lush green tapestry of the structure’s facade will be entwined with the foliage of the adjacent park in order to replicate the natural cliffs of the Blue Mountains, which are located in the Western part of Sydney.”

Some 190 native Australian species and 160 non-natives will cover more than 1,200 square feet from the 2nd to 33rd floors, or some 50 percent of the building’s exterior. The Architect’s Newspaper said this is possible because Blanc has perfected the use of “synthetic moss instead of soil for the growing medium.”

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Dezeen
tells us that the building is specially designed to redirect light to parts of the vertical gardens. “The tallest tower features a large cantilever. On the underneath, there is a heliostat of motorised mirrors that direct sunlight down onto the surrounding gardens. After nightfall, the cantilever is used as a canvas for a LED light installation by artist Yann Kersalé.”

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Those lucky enough to snag one of 624 apartments will be able to descend to the ground levels, where there are stores, restaurants, and some office space.

By using plants and natural sunlight throughout, the building cuts energy use and therefore greenhouse gas emissions.

Nouvel and Blanc are also now teaming up on another green skyscraper in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, which appears to be even taller and more ambitious.

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Fast forward sometime in the near future: Hopefully, this model has spread fast — not just for wealthy renters and owners, but for all urban tower dwellers.

Image credits: Atelier Jean Nouvel

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For more LA in the News, check out
LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Selling English Gardens to the AmericansThe Guardian, 11/21/13
“It’s all hands on deck setting up the show stand at the conference center. Each company sent their work out to the U.S. weeks before and the crates needed unpacking and putting on display, similar to a mini-Chelsea Flower show stand. We had also arranged to get plants from a local nursery to plant in the Italian Terrace pots to further beautify the exhibit. By lunchtime it was looking pretty amazing.”

Green Urbanism is the Future! Well, MaybePlanetizen, 11/24/13
“My guess is the glossy, beautifully photographed images showing built work designed by professionals attract the most attention. But for me, even though I appreciate design eye candy as much as anyone, my focus inevitably shifts to the planning and analysis category and, in particular, the student work, because it is here, in the unrealized work, that we catch a glimpse of where things are headed or, perhaps, should be headed.”

Landscape Architects “Could Enable Paradigm Shift” in Green Infrastructure Alternative to Thames Super SewerLandscape Institute, 11/24/13
“Following the recent successful adoption of green infrastructure (GI) measures in the U.S. city of Philadelphia, the ‘Clean Thames Now and Always’ campaign is proposing a similar combination of GI solutions, including porous asphalt on roads, living roofs and SuDs, as a cheaper and more effective alternative to the tunnel. And landscape architects, says the campaign’s founder Christian Sarrasin, ‘would be the enablers of this paradigm shift.’”

The Thanksgiving LandscapeMetropolis Magazine, 11/25/13
“As we prepare to sit down and stuff our collective faces, let’s take a little time to fill our brains before we fill our bellies. In preparation for the marathon shopping day that is Black Friday, Americans will spend Thursday carbo-loading with stuffing, biscuits, and pie alongside traditional turkey, gravy, and cranberry sauce. So, gather ’round the table, and feel free to share these Thanksgiving facts and figures with your family and friends.”

New York City’s Largest Solar Energy Installation to be built at Freshkills ParkWorld Landscape Architecture, 11/30/13
“The Mayor of New York recently announced that the city will install the largest solar energy installation in New York City at Freshkills Parks. The installation is set to power 2,000 homes and will increase the City’s current renewable energy capacity by 50 percent. The Administration is moving forward with steps to officially map an additional 1,500 acres of Freshkills into parkland, officially bringing the total for Freshkills Park to 2,200 acres and bringing total parkland in New York City to more than 30,000 acres for the first time in history.”

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator

Image credit: Pumpkins ready for harvest / Roemer pumpkin patch 

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Throughout October, the University of Virginia School of Architecture community got to see photographs of the landscape architecture of Reed Hilderbrand, touch samples of materials used in their projects, and grab post-card copies of their site plans. An exhibition of their work culminated in a lecture by founding partners, Douglas Reed, FASLA, and Gary Hilderbrand, FASLA, on their design philosophy.

Rather than being cloistered in an enclosed gallery space, the exhibit occupied the open, eastern hallway of the architecture school where it encouraged daily encounters between students and the firm’s work. It was clear from Reed and Hilderbrand’s talk that both believe places of cultural significance shape fledgling designers and the type of work they ultimately produce.

Each designer situated the firm’s work within his own personal biography and the landscape in which he was raised. In discussing his youth in Louisiana, Reed drew upon Jens Jensen’s belief that we are always longing to return to the “landscape of home.” His experience growing up in a landscape of extreme flatness — contrasted with Hilderbrand’s childhood in the rolling Hudson River Valley — plays a significant role in his unique understanding of the conditions of the ground. Together, they believe “a site’s history and the particular character of its ground – its shape, soil, moisture, vegetative cover – are what motivates meaningful form in our projects.”

While Reed and Hilderbrand may call upon their particular conceptions of home in their design philosophy, they also spoke of the importance of travel. Hilderbrand attributed his year in Rome as a Rome Prize recipient as the primary inspiration him to come together with Reed to found Reed Hilderbrand. Getting to intimately know the landscapes of Rome, not as a tourist, but as an extended visitor with the time and the freedom to “see and return,” made him want to build great places. “Seeing great things is both humbling and inspiring, ” said Hilderbrand.

In their first project together, the Leventritt Garden at the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, their design drew upon not only a deep understanding of the conditions of the site, but also an experiential knowledge of Roman terraces, resulting in an “organic parterre” distinct from, yet perfectly suited to the rest of the Arboretum.

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The success of this first project stemmed from their ability to grasp the site’s unique assets, while drawing on a vast inner library of places seen over years of travel.

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In Reed Hilderbrand’s work at Bennington College, their reading of a set of disjointed site systems from previous eras of development, including an overlay of campus architecture of disparate styles, propelled the partners to bring cohesion to the campus. As Reed says, in this case “we realized that the larger regional context – the panorama of mountains,” with the elevated plateau of the college campus serving as a viewing platform, drew the campus plan together.

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While it was inspiring to see images of Reed Hilderbrand’s work in the everyday environment of the school and in the pages of their new monograph, Visible | Invisible: Landscape Works of Reed Hilderbrand, the magnitude of their effect became more apparent after hearing them reflect upon their work. The elegant detailing, subtle sculpting of the ground, and the clearly distinctive quality of the work, are stunning and motivating.

This guest post is by Rachel Vassar, Master’s of Landscape Architecture Candidate, University of Virginia

Image credits: (1) Visible / Invisible, Metropolis Books, (2) Leventritt Garden / Andrea Jones, (3) Leventritt Garden Plan / Reed Hildebrand, (4) Bennington College plan / Reed Hilderbrand, (5) Bennington College / Michael Moran.

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