Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Opportunities’ Category

ecosystem-services

ASLA 2011 Professional Analysis and Planning Honor Award. Making a Wild Place in Milwaukee’s Urban Menomonee Valley, Milwaukee by Landscapes of Place / Nancy Aten

The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), an international organization committed to strengthening the role of science in public decision-making on biodiversity and ecosystem services, seeks expert landscape architects, ecologists, and others with policy experience to assess its latest research. The call for more engagement was made at a recent presentation at the Ecological Society of America (ESA) in Washington, D.C.

IPBES explains the reason for its existence on its web site: “Biodiversity from terrestrial, marine, coastal, and inland water ecosystems provides the basis for ecosystems and the services they provide that underpin human well-being. However, biodiversity and ecosystem services are declining at an unprecedented rate, and in order to address this challenge, adequate local, national and international policies need to be adopted and implemented. To achieve this, decision makers need scientifically credible and independent information that takes into account the complex relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem services, and people. They also need effective methods to interpret this scientific information in order to make informed decisions. The scientific community also needs to understand the needs of decision makers better in order to provide them with the relevant information. In essence, the dialogue between the scientific community, governments, and other stakeholders on biodiversity and ecosystem services needs to be strengthened.”

To reiterate, Douglas Beard Jr., National Climate Change and Wildlife Center, U.S. Geological Survey, and a co-lead for the science component of IPBES for the U.S. Delegation, said: “It’s always better to hear from a diverse group of people.”

Established in 2012, IPBES has convened multi-disciplinary groups of experts to conduct public assessments around the globe. With 114 member countries, IPBES is dedicated to becoming the leading international organization on ecosystem services.

Assessors will help make progress on the status of pollinators, pollination, and food production; scoping for a set of global and regional assessments of the status of biodiversity and ecosystem services; and scoping for a thematic assessment of land degradation and restoration.

If you are interested in nominating someone or being nominated for an upcoming call, please contact Clifford Duke at ESA, which coordinates the U.S. stakeholders.

Read Full Post »

ideas2

A Memorial for the Canterbury Earthquakes / Christchurch Central Development Unit

In New Zealand in 2010, an earthquake 7.1 on the Richter scale shook open the earth in a previously unknown fault. Over the next three years, some 14,000 aftershocks hit the residents of the Canterbury region. One particularly devastating quake in February 2011 killed 185 people and damaged much of the city of Christchurch. In fact, up until July 2013, the center of Christchurch was totally cordoned off. Clean up and reconstruction has been intensive and ongoing. One sad statistic: only 20 percent of the city’s original buildings will remain when demolition is complete, writes the Christchurch city government.

In a sign of this city’s great resilience, Christchurch has sponsored a new design competition for a Canterbury Earthquake Memorial. The memorial is designed to be a “unique and lasting tribute to the tragic events that have so dramatically reshaped the Canterbury region and people.” The memorial seems to be needed: “people continue to mourn the losses and deal with the challenges of living in a damaged city.”

The memorial will be on a stretch of Ōtākaro/Avon River, between the Montreal Street bridge and Rhododendron Island. The Christchurch government says the site was chosen because it offers a “quiet, contemplative space” that can conversely also host large events for crowds up to 2,000. A tree-lined route, which includes a “bridge of remembrance,” will connect the memorial to the inner city.

The design competition is open to everyone, all over the world. The entries will be judged anonymously, with only an ID number accepted on the submission form. This is mean to eliminate any possible “professional or personal bias” among the judges.

Entries are due August 22.

Another opportunity: Princeton Architectural Press (PAP) is seeking submission for its cutting-edge Pamphlet Architecture series, made possible through support by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). “Pamphlet Architecture is again offering an opportunity for … landscape architects to publish their projects, manifestos, ideas, theories, ruminations, insights, and hopes for the future of the designed and built world. With far-ranging topics including the alphabet, algorithms, machines, and music, each Pamphlet is unique to the individual or group who authors it.”

PAP seeks concepts that “possess the rigor and excitement” found throughout the history of the series. Landscape architects: Register by August 1 and submit your best ideas by September 1. Winners will receive $2,500 to flesh out their proposals.

Read Full Post »

sustainablelandscapes
Vote for Us: ASLA’s web site, Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes, has been nominated for a Webby, the most prestigious award for all things online. We need your help to win the People’s Voice Award. ASLA is currently in 2nd place.

The web site is an online exhibition highlighting real-life examples of sustainable landscape design and its positive effects on the environment and quality of life. These spaces use natural systems to clean the air and water, restore habitats, create healthy communities, and ultimately provide significant economic, social, and environmental value.

A total of 30 case studies illustrate just what sustainable landscapes are and how they provide important benefits on a variety of scales. In the process, the case studies, written in clear, understandable language, also introduce users to what exactly landscape architects do.

The Web site also features 10 animations created by Daniel Tal, ASLA, using SketchUp, which have been watched more than 150,000 times so far. The most recent animation, Designing Neighborhoods for People and Wildlife, explains how to transform your property into a real wildlife habitat. Learn how native plants and designed structures provide what nature needs:

Animations also include companion guides — sustainability education resources that enable users to explore sustainable design concepts in greater depth.

This project was made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Vote for ASLA before April 24th.

Read Full Post »

ecovative

Ecovative natural Styrofoam / Greener Package

The Buckminster Fuller Institute is looking for solutions to the world’s toughest problems. They just released the call for entries for their 2014 Fuller Challenge, “socially-responsible design’s highest award.” Landscape architects, architects, planners, artists, entrepreneurs, and students from everywhere are invited to go for the $100,000 prize for most outstanding strategy.

Buckminster Fuller, who died in 1983, was way ahead of his time. While he is famous for his geodesic dome, which took form in Disney’s “Spaceship Earth” Epcot Center and other buildings, as well as his innovative maps, Fuller’s deeper impact may be on our thinking. He was one of the first modern Western thinkers to connect architecture to ecology and the environment.

According to the institute that bears his name, Fuller called for a “design revolution to make the world work for 100 percent of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone.”

This worthy goal is now being pursued through the Fuller challenge, which seeks to identify global change-makers. Winners haven’t just taken on a building or landscape but a whole broken system.

Last year, an amazing group of materials innovators at Ecovative took home the prize for their game-changing Styrofoam made of mycelium and agricultural waste. The year before, the Living Building Challenge won for showing the world how a green building could become a self-sustaining system.

Submit your concept by April 11, 2014.

Another competition is a bit of good news for Ukraine, which faces challenges on so many fronts at the moment. A new ideas competition from the Can-action 2014 festival will award 5,000 EU for the best user-generated public space concept. Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei is one of the judges. Submit ideas by April 17.

 

Read Full Post »

The 11th street bridge, which connects Washington D.C.’s historic Capitol Hill and Anacostia neighborhoods, is being rebuilt, opening up a new opportunity to create a 900-foot-long elevated park. A new design competition launched by Building Bridges Across the River at THEARC and the D.C. Office of Planning aims to transform this old freeway bridge into a new venue for “healthy recreation, environmental education, and the arts” for the nearly 80,000 people who live near the bridge as well as the greater district.

This new park will become the High Line of the district, but with even better views: it will span the Anacostia River and provide vistas of the nearby Navy Yard and Diamond Teague parks.

According to the design organizers, the 11th Street Bridge Park will accomplish four goals: “connect two diverse communities, re-engage residents with the Anacostia River, improve public health, and become an anchor for economic development.”

The organizers have already started on an in-depth public design process, conducted through over 200 meetings with church leaders, business owners, and residents on both sides of the Anacostia river. Landscape architects and architects will need to incorporate these ideas into their design proposals. The community wants the park to provide an environmental education center, a performance area, urban agriculture, an “accessible and multi-generational playscape,” a cafe, and kayak and canoe launches for the river below.

Tendani Mplubusi-El, Ward 8 artist and resident said: “I think the bridge is going to bring a lot of people together who normally don’t cross paths.” Deborah Ratner Salzberg, president of Forest City Washington, the developer of the Navy Yard, added that: “The creation of vibrant public spaces is so critical to effective urban revitalization. The adaptive reuse 11th Street Bridge Park project will result in yet another very valuable asset for connecting the community in this area of the District.”

park

11th Street Park rendering by Ed Estes / D.C. Office of Planning

An esteemed jury that includes Dr. Howard Frumkin, a leading public health scholar at the University of Washington, and Carol Mayer Reed, FASLA, head of landscape architecture at Mayer / Reed, will be advised by an additional “design oversight committee.”

Submit qualifications for stage one by April 22. Teams must be lead by a landscape architect and architect. The jury will then interview the top 6-8 finalists. By stage two, each team will be given $25,000 to create full design renderings, which will be evaluated for cost and constructability. These final proposals will be publicly displayed at the District Architecture Center and online. The organizers expect the project to cost somewhere in the range of $25 million. About $500,000 has been raised so far.

Read Full Post »

tanner

Tanner Spring Park, Portland / Atelier Dreiseitl and GreenWorks

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) seeks a full-time summer intern for an exciting project: The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Sustainable Portland. This Web site, which will include both mobile-friendly version and a more robust online exhibition, will feature both well-known and up-and-coming landscape architects discussing what makes Portland such a livable, sustainable city. The Web site, which is modeled after the first guides in the series on Washington, D.C. and Boston, is expected to launch in fall 2014.

The site will be a guide to both sustainable landscapes and design-thinking. The goal of the project is to both educate locals and visitors who come to Portland about how landscape architects create sustainable places. Landscape architects will delve into the site plans, design details, interesting historic features, and sustainable design features. The guide will feature sustainable design at all scales, from parks to rain gardens, green streets to green roofs.

Responsibilities:

The summer intern will be expected to work full-time on this project from June through August.

The intern will research and write fact sheets about the sustainable landscapes, using historical records and available books and Web sites; manage photographs, including securing any stock photos and image credits; coordinate outreach materials to ASLA members and aid in social media promotion; and directly interact with a number of leading landscape architects to gather their feedback on given sites and edit the text for publication.

Interns will also have the opportunity to attend educational and networking events at the National Building Museum, Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks, and other museums and think tanks in Washington, D.C. and write articles for ASLA publications, including The Dirt blog and LAND newsletter. Other projects may come up as well.

Requirements:

Current enrollment in a Master’s or PhD program in landscape architecture.

Excellent writing skills. The intern must be able to write clearly for a general audience.

Excellent photographic composition and editing skills. Ability to use a SLR camera.

Proven research skills and ability to quickly evaluate the quality and relevance of many different types of Web resources.

Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to interact graciously with busy designers.

Working knowledge of Photoshop, Google Maps, and Microsoft Office suite.

Knowledge of Portland’s ecological systems and history of sustainable design a plus.

How to Apply:

Please send cover letter, CV, one writing sample (no more than 3 pages), and two photography examples (JPEGs, no more than 1MB each), to aklages@asla.org by end of day, Friday, March 21.

Phone interviews will be conducted with finalists the week of March 24 and selection will be made the following week.

The internship pays a stipend of $3,500. ASLA can also work with the interns to attain academic credit for the internship.

ASLA offers a flexible work schedule but the intern must be at ASLA’s national headquarters, which is conveniently located in downtown Washington, D.C., one block north of the Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro Station on the Red, Yellow, and Green Lines. Learn more about ASLA’s green roof.

Read Full Post »

Tulane University is offering a $1 million prize to the team who comes up with the best solution for combating hypoxia-affected waters, the dead zones in the world’s lakes and oceans. Hypoxia is the oxygen depletion in water bodies caused by “excessive amounts of river-borne fertilizers and other nutrients.” Tulane’s grand challenge is a response to President Obama’s call for universities and philanthropies to step up and pursue innovative solutions to our most pressing environmental problems.

While the Gulf of Mexico is famous for its growing dead zone, the issue is increasingly global, writes Tulane. All over the world’s oceans and lakes, “nutrient enrichment can jeopardize the future of estuaries and coastal wetlands that depend on freshwater and sediment delivery for stability and persistence.”

Dead zones not only have an impact on the environment but also the economy. These unproductive areas “destabilize the businesses, families and communities that are sustained by fisheries.”

Phyllis Taylor, head of the Patrick F. Taylor foundation, who put up the million, said: “I believe a market based solution which rewards innovation and risk taking has the potential to create a sustainable and significant new technology for addressing hypoxia.”

Cristin Dorgelo, assistant director for Grand Challenges in the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, said: “Prizes have led to breakthroughs ranging from Lindbergh’s transatlantic flight to new approaches to cleaning up oil spills.”

This is a great challenge because finding a solution clearly won’t be easy: “Solutions must meet a suite of simultaneous and sometimes conflicting needs – from protecting water resources and near-shore ecosystems to ensuring the capacity and vitality of agricultural productivity.”

The university writes that the prize will be awarded to a “testable, scaled and marketable operating model that significantly, efficiently and cost effectively reduces hypoxia.”

Landscape architects and planners should join interdisciplinary teams and enter the competition. They can help create the solutions that keep agricultural and stormwater runoff out of rivers and combat the dead zones.

Another competition for landscape architects: At the European Biennial of Landscape Architecture in Barcelona in October, one landscape created in the last five years will win the Rosa Barba European Landscape Prize, which comes with €15,000. Submit projects before April 11, 2014.

Read Full Post »

louisville
Like so many other American cities, Louisville, Kentucky, must deal with thousands of vacant properties. The city government alone owns more than 450. To turn these vacant lots into assets, the city government and Vision Louisville have launched Lots of Possibility, an innovative design competition to transform blighted, abandoned spaces.

The city government tells us: “Vacant properties not only threaten the health, safety and vibrancy of a neighborhood – but they also are lost opportunities to create active places that strengthen neighborhoods.”

Individuals or teams can submit ideas for either permanent or temporary uses of city-owned lots. The city will select six finalists for each category and then two winners for each, which will receive seed funding.

The city government explains how the competition works for both categories:

Permanent projects (e.g., residential, commercial, institutional/civic, or other use that requires taking ownership of the lot)
Two winners in this category will receive ownership of the vacant lot proposed + $15,000 in seed funding to make the project happen. In this category, particular emphasis will be placed on making sure that the idea is not only creative, cost effective and able to be replicated, but also has the potential to be fully funded (assuming that additional funds beyond the prize package are needed.

Temporary/interim projects (e.g., do not involve a physical structure that will be difficult to remove; one to two year lease of the vacant lot acceptable)
This category is designed for proposals that identify innovative ways to repurpose vacant lots. Uses are not expected to be permanent at the outset, but rather to preserve the land for future potential development. Two winners in this category will receive a one year land lease (renewable for an additional year) + $4,000 in project funding. Please note that winners will be expected to maintain the lot, as well as restore the site, at the end of the lease.

The city has made 250 vacant lots available. “They are of varying sizes, shapes and locations.”

Learn more about the scale of Louisville’s vacant lot issue. Landscape architects: search and select a vacant lot before submitting a proposal. Ideas are due by February 24.

Another worthy design competition in Louisville seeks a design for a new children’s museum complex. Winners will take home $6,000. Register online by February 10.

Image credit: Vacant properties in Louisville / Preservation Louisville

Read Full Post »

steelyard
If you do, the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) wants to know, as it seeks submissions for its 16th annual Great Places awards. The organization is looking for work that “demonstrates how an understanding of the experience of place may be used to generate insightful design.” Winners have successfully combined “expertise in design, research, and practice” in a way that “contributes to the creation of dynamic, humane places that engage our attention and imagination.”

EDRA say great places are the result of an “interdisciplinary approach that is enduring, human-centered, sustainable, and concerned with the experiential relationship between people and their environment (built and natural) over time.”

The competition is really open to all: “Submissions are welcome from the full breadth of environmental design and related research activities, including architecture, landscape architecture, planning, urban design, interior design, lighting design, graphic design, place-based public art, environmental psychology, sociology, anthropology, geography, and the physical sciences.”

There are four awards categories: place design, place planning, place research, and the Great Places Book Prize.

In past years, a number of well-known contemporary landscape architecture designs, plans, projects have won Great Places awards. Last year, Gustafson Guthrie Nichol’s National Mall design competition entry, Unified Ground, won an award. In 2012, Escuela Ecologica Saludable Initiative: Parque Primaria Pitagoras, an innovative research project from University of Washington landscape architecture professor Benjamin Spencer, won. In earlier years, The Steel Yard Park by Kloper Martin Design Group, which also won an ASLA Professional Design Award, was deemed a great place as well.

Submissions are due by February 3.

Another competition that may be of interest to landscape architects: the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) seeks entries for its 2014 ideas competition in Copenhagen. They invite “interdisciplinary teams from around the world to submit their ideas for what infrastructure art of sustainable cities looks like.” LAGI gives awards to the best ideas for “public art that provides utility-scale clean energy to the grid.” The top 50 submissions will be included in an exhibition and book.

Image credit: ASLA 2011 Professional General Design Honor Award. Steel Yard Park by Klopfer Martin Design Group / Annali Kiers

Read Full Post »

mikyoungkim
The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has released its call for entries for the 2014 professional and student awards, the premier awards programs for the profession. Award recipients will receive featured coverage in the October, 2014, issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine and in many other design and construction industry and general-interest media.

Award recipients, their clients, and student advisors also will be honored at the awards presentation ceremony during the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Denver, November 15–18, 2014. The award-winning projects will be featured in a video presentation at the ceremony and on the awards website following the event.

The prestige of the ASLA awards programs relies on the high-caliber juries that are convened each year to review submissions. Members of this year’s professional awards jury are:

  • James Burnett, FASLA, Office of James Burnett, Solana Beach, Calif., Jury Chair
  • Catherine Barner, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, San Francisco
  • Alain DeVergie, FASLA, U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C.
  • Kona Gray, ASLA, EDSA, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
  • David Hocker, ASLA, Hocker Design Group, Dallas
  • Keith LeBlanc, FASLA, Keith LeBlanc Landscape Architecture, Boston
  • Anne Raver, Journalist, Reisterstown, Md.
  • Jerry van Eyck, ASLA, !melk, New York City
  • Thaisa Way, ASLA, University of Washington, Seattle.

Members of the student awards jury are:

  • Gina Ford, ASLA, Sasaki, Watertown, Mass., Jury Chair
  • Rebecca Barnes, FAIA, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Sandra Y. Clinton, FASLA, Clinton & Associates, Hyattsville, Md.
  • Bernard Dahl, FASLA, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.
  • Christian Gabriel, ASLA, U.S. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • Eric Kramer, ASLA, Reed Hilderbrand, Watertown, Mass.
  • Willett Moss, ASLA, CMG Landscape Architecture, San Francisco
  • Brian Sawyer, ASLA, Sawyer/Berson, New York City
  • Dennis Carmichael, FASLA, Parker Rodriguez, Alexandria, Va.

Both the ASLA Professional and Student awards feature five categories: General Design; Residential Design; Analysis and Planning; Communications; and Research. The Professional Awards also include The Landmark Award, while the Student Awards include the Student Community Service Award and Student Collaboration categories.

Entry forms and payment must be received by:

March 7, 2014 for ASLA Professional Awards
April 25, 2014 for ASLA Student Awards.

Submission binders must be received by:

March 21, 2014 for ASLA Professional Awards
May 9, 2014 for ASLA Student Awards.

In need of inspiration? View the ASLA 2013 professional and student award-winning projects.

Image credit: ASLA 2014 Professional General Design Honor Award. The Crown Sky Garden: Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. Mikyoung Kim Design / George Heinrich Photography

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,058 other followers