Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Opportunities’ Category

hans
A new international ideas competition from the Hans Christian Andersen House of Fairy Tales in Odense, Denmark, hopes to create a new place that can “match the poetry” of famed children’s book author Hans Christian Andersen. The goal is to create a new a building and a garden that will welcome people into Andersen’s world. Odense City Museums and the Odense city government invite all types of design professionals, artists, and communicators to create a comprehensive concept that will take the current disjointed facilities and make a global attraction. The winning design will take home 100,000 euros.

One of Odense’s main attractions is the little yellow corner house where Hans Christian Andersen was born. But for the sponsors of the competition, that little house doesn’t match the stature of the man who wrote The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Princess and the Pea, and other children’s classics.

Torben Grøngaard Jeppesen, museum director, Odense City Museums, said: “The House of Fairy Tales should reflect the international renown of Andersen, and its architecture should be of the very best quality. The garden should be a unique urban space that serves as a place of inspiration, immersion, surprise and play and invites local residents and visitors to the House of Fairy Tales to come in to experience this. The aspiration is to create a strong whole that fits into the surroundings in an elegant and respectful way.”

The concept needs to place this new destination into the broader urban context. The competition site is located in Odense’s city center, which is apparently undergoing a total overhaul. A four-lane highway is being torn down, and old neighborhoods bisected in the 1960s will be re-sown together. “New green neighborhoods with housing, workplaces and commercial and cultural facilities will be created.”

Jørgen Clausen, chief executive, City of Odense, said: “The vision of a more coherent city center is a unique basis for development of a House of Fairy Tales and an adjacent garden. Both will be distinctive elements in the historic part of Odense.”

See a video of the location:

Once the idea has been settled upon through this competition, the sponsors will organize a subsequent design competition to create more detailed designs. That design competition will be “restricted,” most likely to the finalists from the ideas competition.

Submissions are due by November 29, 2013. Learn more.

Image credit: Hans Christian Andersen / Anne Grahame Johnstone

Read Full Post »

suburbia
Suburbia Transformed 3.0, a new residential landscape design competition sponsored by the James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design, aims to identify new residential works that “go beyond ‘green’ to address the aesthetic quality of human experience.” The goal is to show how “such sustainable landscapes can be beautiful, inspiring, perhaps profound; and serve as examples for transforming the suburban residential fabric, one garden at a time.”

The organizers seek both “built and visionary (unbuilt) residential landscapes” from both professionals and students. While there are no monetary prizes offered, winners will become part of a publication and traveling exhibition.

According to the James Rose Center, “James Rose is remembered as one of three Harvard students who rebelled against their Beaux Arts training in the 1930s, helping to usher landscape architecture—kicking and screaming—into the modern era. Yet somewhere after Harvard and well into the real world, Rose lost faith in the modern planning and design professions he had helped to inspire. By the mid 1950s, he had retreated from public practice and spent most of the latter part of his career designing private gardens that were in direct contrast to the environmental excess and cultural banality of the emerging contemporary post-WWII suburb.”

Rose called his private gardens, which were made with found objects, recycled materials, and native plants, “space-sculptures-with-shelters.” His novel approach had a purpose: to merge a “conservation ethic into a modern design aesthetic.” Rose’s point was that a place needed to be beautiful in order to be sustained (and sustainable).

To succeed in this competition, which is based on Rose’s philosophy, designers will need to:

  • “Make the most of what’s already on the site (earth, rocks, plants, structures, water) before importing or removing anything.
  • Use local, inexpensive, low-energy-consumptive, non-polluting materials and construction techniques before others.
  • Consider the landscape’s potential to create useful resources rather than consume them.
  • Consider the relationship of the site to larger environmental systems.
  • Consider means for guiding future growth and evolution of the garden.”

The competition is open to landscape architects, landscape designers, architects, individuals, teams or firms. Students will be considered in a separate category.

The high-profile jury of landscape architects include: Andrea Cochran FASLA, Principal, Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture; Tobiah Horton, LEED AP, Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; David Kamp, FASLA, LF, NA, Dirtworks; Keith LeBlanc, FASLA, Keith LeBlanc Landscape Architecture, Inc.; and Darrel Morrison, FASLA, Ecological Landscape Design and Management.

Entry forms are due by February 18, 2014, with submissions due by March 20. To submit, the fee for professionals is $115 and $50 for students.

Check out previous winners, too.

Image credit: Suburbia Transformed 2.0 winner / James Rose Center

Read Full Post »

omaha
A national landscape design competition is set to launch in mid-September in Omaha, Nebraska. The goal is to turn a 70 foot x 100 foot portion of the urban core into a model green space. The winning team will earn $200,000 to fully implement their vision.

The competition, Green in the City, “is an opportunity to develop and implement a creative design for open space in Omaha that can inspire other urban communities to follow suit,” said Connie Spellman, director of Omaha by Design, the competition organizers.

Omaha by Design is an urban design and environmental non-profit that focuses on “improving Omaha’s look, feel, and function.” The urban design and environmental components of the Omaha’s master plan serve as a starting point for Omaha by Design’s projects, which include green street visioning and planning and other sustainable initiatives.

This project will connect with the future BLUEBARN Theatre, scheduled to break ground in early 2014. After the design has been implemented, ownership of the open space and maintenance responsibilities will be turned over to the theatre.

According to Spellman, “the Green in the City competition will be judged by a panel of local and regional art, design and landscape experts. The top finalists will receive an honorarium and travel expenses to Omaha. Interview presentations will be held in early 2014.”

A request for qualifications (RFQ) will be available in mid-September. Multi-disciplinary design teams from across the country are encouraged to submit.

Learn more. Hopefully more details will be coming over the following weeks.

This guest post is by Phil Stamper, ASLA PR and Communications Coordinator

Image credit: Omaha sign / Flickr

Read Full Post »

mask
The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston just opened an exhibition called Composite Landscapes: Photomontage and Landscape Architecture, which features a dozen landscape architects and some major contemporary artists. The exhibit, which was curated by Charles Waldheim, Affiliate ASLA, chair of the landscape architecture department at Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD), focuses on one of landscape architecture’s most vital forms: the montage view, the piecing together of multiple separate views to form a deeper perspective. Waldheim believes that photomontage can help us understand the “conceptual, experiential, and temporal dimensions of landscapes.”

Waldheim, who is also Ruettgers Consulting Curator of Landscape at the museum, said: “The practice of montage, the overlay or superimposition of one image over another to produce a composite image, is as old as image making itself. Various forms of photomontage emerged as critical and conceptual tools across a range of the visual arts throughout the twentieth century.”

But while photomontage was once cutting-edge, it’s now an old-school art form, made “nearly obsolete due to the evolving digital world” — except perhaps among landscape architects, who have kept the practice alive. Waldheim writes: “the practice of photomontage … is arguably the field’s dominant visual paradigm today.” It may still be used because it’s “well suited to representing the temporal, phenomenal, and transformational aspects of landscape.”

One gallery will offer up views of photomontage works by contemporary artists David Hockney, Jan Dibbets, John Stezaker, and Superstudio, while another will look at the history of landscape montage from the 18th to the 20th centuries, with works by Humphry Repton, Booth Grey, and Charles Eliot.

The main gallery will feature works by landscape architects Adriaan Geuze, International ASLA, West 8; James Corner, ASLA, Field Operations; Gary Hilderbrand, FASLA, Reed Hilderbrand; Ken Smith, ASLA, Ken Smith Workshop; and Michael Van Valkenburgh, FASLA.

Hilderbrand
The exhibition is open until September 2, 2013. Learn more.

Image credits: (1) Mash XLVI by John Stezaker / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, (2) Glass House Reflections II by Gary Hilderbrand, FASLA / Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Read Full Post »

sandy
In December last year, President Obama signed an executive order creating the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Taskforce. One result of this new taskforce is Rebuild by Design, a “multi-stage regional design competition to promote resilience” in Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. According to the taskforce, the goal of the competition is to “promote innovation by developing regionally-scalable but locally-contextual solutions that increase resilience in the region, and to implement selected proposals with both public and private funding dedicated to this effort.” The competition will use HUD Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding to “incentivize implementation of winning projects and proposals.” This is an exciting opportunity for landscape architects and other designers that has the potential to guide future development.

The taskforce writes that “design solutions are expected to range in scope and scale – from large-scale green infrastructure to small-scale residential resiliency retrofits. The competition process will also strengthen our understanding of regional interdependencies, fostering coordination and resilience both at the local level and across the U.S.” However, organizers are specifically looking for solutions that “can ignite innovation, outside-the-box perspectives, and address new trends” while having a significant regional impact. The taskforce wants the competition to connect local government efforts to those at the national level, while also bringing in multiple players from the business, academic, and non-profit sectors.

Given the region they are focusing on is very complex, “with differing governance structures, culture, etc,” the competition is organized into groups: coastal communities, high-density urban environments, ecological and water body networks, and a catch-all category of unidentified or unexpected focus.” Teams submitting entries will need to focus on one area:

Coastal communities
This category focuses on small- to mid-sized coastal communities. These communities are characterized by limited capacity and high coastal vulnerability. Here, there is often a tension between environmental and economic systems (i.e. the tourism industry is dependent on the environment and also vulnerable to it).

High-density urban environments
These economically-significant areas have impacts on both the region and the nation as a whole. These communities have highly complex built and human systems and significant economic value for the entire region. When storms like Sandy hit these communities they cause major disruptions to both the local and regional economy.

Ecological and waterbody networks
These networks are regional by nature; watersheds and ecosystems disregard administrative boundaries and must be considered from the regional scale. This category focuses on the interdependencies between the built and natural environments.

The unidentified and unexpected
This category allows for selected teams to pursue unexpected questions and innovative proposals outside of the framework provided above. This is an open category to encourage outside-the-box approaches and proposals.

Design teams must have professional proficiency in three of these subjects: infrastructure engineering, landscape design, urban design, architecture, land use planning, community development, communications design, public finance, or real estate. Teams should also have expertise in: social sciences, economic development, ecology, hydrology, water safety, transportation, resilience, sustainability, project management, finance, arts, graphic design, industrial design, or other disciplines as appropriate.

The first round of the competition will result in 5-10 finalists, which will then be given $100,000 in stage two of the competition to further flesh out their design proposals. Teams moving to stage three will receive another $100,000. The first round jury includes Shaun Donovan, HUD Secretary; Dr. Howard Frumkin, Dean, School of Health, University of Washington; Ricky Burdett, LSE Professor; Mark Terkel, President of The Nature Conservancy; Bruce Katz, Vice President at the Brookings Institution; representatives from ASLA, AIA, and ULI; and others.

Read the design brief and send in your qualifications and proposal by July 19. Find answers to your questions.

In other news from the federal government: Laurie Olin, FASLA, just became the fourth landscape architect in American history to receive the National Medal of Art. Previous winners include landscape architects Lawrence Halprin, Dan Kiley, and Ian McHarg. The National Endowment for the Arts writes that Olin is recognized “for his contributions as a preeminent landscape architect. Renowned for his acute sense of harmony and balance between nature and design, Mr. Olin has dedicated his energy to shaping many iconic spaces around the world and to educating new leaders in his art.” He’s in great company this year, too. Star Wars visionary George Lucas, painter Elsworth Kelly, and opera singer Renee Fleming will also be honored.

Image credit: Hurricane Sandy damage / New York Daily News

Read Full Post »

Image 1 Mini Golf Clubs  Anne McDonough Photography
The National Building Museum’s summer mini-golf is back, this time with two courses of nine holes each. Each hole was constructed around the theme “Building the Future” and was designed by a variety of architects, landscape architects, designers and contractors. A group of four of us played through both courses; the highlights, favorites and frustrations of which are detailed below.

Perhaps the coolest looking hole on either course was Holograph Hole on the Green course. Designed and built by architecture firm Skidmore, Ownings & Merrill with help from students at Catholic University’s School of Architecture, this hole featured a 3-D virtual cityscape in glowing holographic green. Calling attention to the digital tools that architects now use, this hole highlights how 3-D technology is also changing the design process. Par was 2. Half of our crew scored on par, the other half a 3. Is it an acceptable excuse to say the sci-fi surroundings were a bit distracting because they were just so awesome?

Image 2 Holograph Hole Kevin Allen Photography
FOREward Thinking
, hole 6 on the Green course, was built and designed by STUDIOS Architecture, under the premise that we can be sustainable by revitalizing old buildings. Common materials came together in the construction of this hole, along with two separate paths, one of which was up a ramp and down a xylophone. This route was, of course, not the direct route.  Par was 3, which our group easily made, with the exception of yours truly, who got stuck trying unsuccessfully to use the xylophone. This resulted in 2 over par, though the invitation to draw on the chalkboard walls took away some of the sting.

Image 3 FOREward Thinking Emily Clack Photography
Hole 8 on the Green Course, Capital RiverGreen, designed by Shalom Baranes Associates and built by Winmar Construction, showcases D.C.’s relatively new Yards Park, which runs along the Anacostia River. Depending on where you stand, panels line up to create large pictures of the landscape in and surrounding the park. Play is directed around a tiny Navy Yard Metro sign and over the park’s iconic bridge rendered in miniature. Enjoyment of this hole has to do with an interest in community green space and not just because of a score of 2 on a par 3.

Image 4 Capitol RiverGreen - Photo by Kevin Allen Photography (2)
Our merry band of mini golf players made it through the “easy” Green Course, which was par 25, with a respectable 24 and 25, as well as a slightly less than respectable 26 and 28. But who’s judging? We’re just having fun. On to the Blue Course, which, you guessed it, was the “hard” course. Some of the holes on this course seem nearer to impossible than hard, but again, who’s judging?

First up was Mount Vernon Triangulation, which at first blush is deceptively simple – lines of light form triangles on a flat rectangle with a straight path to the hole. Then you step on it and realize that where you stand affects the shape of the putting green. Designer, E/L Studio, and builders, Think Make Build; FLOR; and Independent Custom Metalworks, want to teach participants about triangulation, which is a process that determines a location by using other known and fixed points. Upon closer inspection, the lines of blue lights also form a map of the Mount Vernon Triangle. It is possible to direct the ball by jumping from side to side and changing the shape of the course rather like a game of pinball, but no need, we were all off to a good start scoring on par or below on this hole’s par 3.

Image 5 Mount Vernon Triangulation - Emily Clack Photography
The Evolution of the Office
, Hole 2, which was designed by Determined by Design and built by DAVIS Construction, reminds us that technology has fundamentally changed how, and where, we work. Our laptops and smartphones give us the opportunity to take our work from the office to the park bench. This, like many holes on the Blue course, provides the player with two routes, generally one more direct than the other. Not wanting to say no to challenge, I chose the route over the desks and back around the park bench. The angle is a bit awkward and high off the ground, so it seemed like a good idea to use the club like a pool cue. That is until the ball went flying off the bench and landed on the other side of the room. This resulted in a score of 4, 2 over par, with my mini-golf associates scoring at par, or 1 over.  You might guess who chose the direct route.

Image 6 The Evolution of the Office - Anne McDonough Photography
Hole 4, The Future’s Looking Up!, designed by Bonstra I Haresign Architects and built by Monarc Construction, shows the player the latest in green roof technology. Play is a straight shot uphill, once you get past the drainage elements and round the chimney. But don’t get too confident, or you’ll end up in the roof’s gutter which sends you back down the hill. Par was 3, though only one in our group scored that, with the rest of us scoring a very sorry and disappointing 6.

Image 7 The Future's Looking Up! Green Roofs as our New Urban Playgrounds - Photo by Kevin Allen Photography
Tomorrow’s Water
, Hole 5, sponsored by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) and designed and built by students at Virginia Tech’s Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center is not only arguably the most beautiful hole on either course, it is without question one of the most difficult. Carved in layered wood, this hole shows in topographic detail D.C.’s watershed and forces the player to confront something that few of us ever consider in our day-to-day lives: Where does storm water go and how does it get there? Par is 3, though if it weren’t for witnessing a hole in one, one might argue par should be nigh impossible. Unlike water which flows where it will, there is one route that will lead you directly to the hole, but beware falling off the edge. If that happens, you might have to call it at 6 strokes rather than admitting the 15 strokes you took to try and get back on track.

Image 8 Tomorrow's Water - Photo by Kevin Allen Photography
The Blue Course’s Hole 7 provides a much needed respite after the frustrations of some of the earlier holes on the course. Imagination Powers the Future, designed and built by Hargrove, Inc., is whimsical, colorful, and a direct shot with a par 3. This hole is based on the idea that imagination and creativity make the world a better place.  We were all happy to make it under par, with one in the group getting a hole in one.

Image 9 Imagination Powers the Future - Anne McDonough Photography
The last hole on the Blue Course, PARticipatory TERRAIN, designed by D.C.-based landscape architecture firm, Landscape Architecture Bureau (LAB), built by Harkins Builders, and sponsored by The JBG Companies, requires the player to choose a side on a yes or no question, and by placing a pink plastic rod on the side of their answer, decide themselves how to change the route to the hole. The question our group confronted, “Should we prepare for an asteroid to hit the earth?” was split pretty evenly between the yes and no camps, something that may have helped direct the ball neatly to the hole, under the par 3, with one of us scoring a hole in one. Come back each week for a new question, and new challenge.

Image 10 PARticipatory TERRAIN - Photo by Kevin Allen Photography (2)
Blue Course’s par was a 26, and proved for most of us to be as much of a challenge as it was billed to be. We scored a 29, a 31 (uffda, that’s yours truly), a 23 (show-off), and a 28.

At $5 per course per person, this is truly a fun time. Come down and show off your mad mini-golf skills and prove you’re up for the challenge.

The National Building Museum’s Mini-Golf runs now through Labor Day, with a few late nights this summer where you can couple with BBQ and a live band. Don’t miss it. You might learn something, too.

This guest post is by Heidi Petersen, Student ASLA, ASLA 2013 summer intern and Master’s of Landscape Architecture candidate, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT)

Image credits: (1) Mini Golf Clubs / Anne McDonough Photography, (2) Holograph Hole / Kevin Allen Photography, (3) FOREWard Thinking / Emily Clack Photography, (4) Capital RiverGreen / Kevin Allen Photography, (5) Mount Vernon Triangulation / Emily Clack Photography, (6) The Evolution of the Office / Anne McDonough Photography, (7) The Future’s Looking Up! / Kevin Allen Photography, (8) Tomorrow’s Water / Kevin Allen Photography, (9)) Imagination Powers the Future / Anne McDonough Photography, (10) PARticipatory TERRAIN / Kevin Allen Photography

Read Full Post »

burbank
The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s Ecosystem Design Group, has put together a new webinar series called “Principles of Successful Sustainable Landscapes: Specification, Installation, and Maintenance.” The goal of this series is to train professionals and contractors in the “efficient and successful specification, installation, and maintenance of projects with sustainable features.”

According to the center, the webinar series will teach landscape architects and designers how to successfully design sustainable landscapes, “starting with the foundational aspects of the process and culminating with techniques used to quantify the success of the design.”

The series is based on standards developed by the Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES™), a rating system and guide for sustainable land design, construction, and maintenance practices, created through a joint partnership with ASLA, the Lady Bird Wildflower Center, and U.S. Botanic Garden.

Here are details on the webinars:

Webinar 1: Soils for Sustainable Landscapes (10 a.m. CST, June 18th)
“This webinar will cover the concepts of plant-soil relationships and the characteristics of soil that need to be examined for sustainable design, including: compaction, texture, soil biology, types and role of organic matter and soil chemistry. It will also discuss how to interpret soil test results and quantify specifications for soils and soil amendments (fertilizer, compost, etc.) for restoration, plant establishment and growth.” Duration: 50 minutes.

Webinar 2: Site Preparation + Installation (10 a.m. CST, July 9th)
“This webinar session will discuss soil preparation and protection strategies, compost testing and amendments, compaction testing, BMP’s, and developing a preparation schedule. The course also highlights installation timing,
irrigation schedules and site hygiene techniques.” Duration: 50 minutes.

Webinar 3: Maintenance for Sustainable Landscapes (10 a.m. CST, July 23rd)
“This webinar session will highlight maintenance strategies and benchmarks aimed at establishing and maintaining sustainable landscapes. Techniques discussed in this course include irrigation and mowing frequency, plant
succession, monitoring of plant health, and monitoring and treatment of problematic species.” Duration: 50 minutes.

Webinar 4: Master Planning + Stakeholder Engagement (10 a.m. CST, August 6th)
“This webinar will cover one of the foundational aspects of sustainable landscape practices, planning and public facilitation. The session will discuss basic concepts and processes of facilitation, such as how to prepare and run a stakeholder meeting. Additionally, these concepts and processes will be reinforced by providing Master Plan examples which use site assessment information to develop a project vision, measurable objectives, landscape performance goals, and interpretive themes.”

To take one webinar, it costs $90 per person or $115 per group. For the entire series, each is a bit cheaper: $300 per person, or $400 per group. The center says it’s recommended that participants attend all sessions, as “content builds across the series.” Course certificates will also issued to those who finish all four.

Register today.

Also, ASLA members and other landscape architects can take advantage of a new online learning series hosted by ASLA’s professional practice networks (PPNs). Nine online recordings of webinars are now available, covering topics ranging from 3D modeling to ecological restoration to sustainable water management strategies, all presented by experts in the field. Webinars are either 60 or 90 minutes. They are free to view for ASLA members; non-members must pay $75. To take the test to earn professional development hours, ASLA members can pay $40 and non-members can pay $60. Coming in June are two new live webinars on therapeutic gardens and outdoor learning for school-age children. Another comprehensive set of recorded webinars is also coming in the fall.

Image credit: Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) Pilot Project. BWP Eco Campus / Heliophoto 

Read Full Post »

Dirt
Which city is the most fun? Building Trust International aims to answer that question by seeking professional and student proposals to “turn a neglected forgotten part of your city into a PLAYscape.” Building Trust will pursue funding and planning for the winning design in the professional category, while the winner in the student category will win $100 and the opportunity to volunteer with the build of the winning professional design.

Building Trust, a charity based in England and Wales, works with existing charities and communities in need by providing design and architecture support, as summed up in their motto, “Solving a world of issues through design.”

The PLAYscapes competition brief details the grim story of an under-active, play-less world, explaining that only a third of all teenagers get enough exercise and that five percent of adults believe they have the right work/play life balance. When people have the opportunity to play, they see benefits such as increased stamina, reduced stress, and improved social skills.

In the end, this competition intends to show how designers can make cities fun, healthy places with opportunities for play in the most creative ways imaginable. Of the suggestions within the brief, “you could re-imagine a street park, propose a basketball court on a vacant lot, [or] attach urban swings to bus stops. The possibilities are endless.”

Everyone is eligible to enter this competition, and presentation technique is at the discretion of the entrant. However, the brief recommends that the concept of the design includes sketches or renders, plans, sections, and elevations.

Submissions must be received by July 29, 2013.

Registration is £75.00 for professionals and £15.00 for students; both types of registrations will be free to those entering from a developing country. For the purposes of this competition, developing countries are defined as any of the World Bank’s lower middle or low-income countries listed here.

This guest post is by Phil Stamper, ASLA PR and Communications Coordinator

Image credit: Building Trust International

Read Full Post »

rockaway
Rockaway, Queens, a low-lying area in New York City, was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, so a fascinating new design competition seeks to create a more resilient and sustainable form of development for this vulnerable area, and, really, others like it in New York City and other coastal cities. FAR ROC [For a Resilient Rockaway] is a design competition that will delve into “innovative strategies for the planning, design and construction” of a more resilient place at Arverne East, an 80+ acre site on the Rockaway Peninsula. Their ambitious goal: new best practices for development in waterfront areas.

The conference organizers, which include the NYC Department of Housing and Development, AIA NY, and others, write that finding a new approach will be tricky, given many argue that some flood-prone areas should really be left undeveloped. “Costly damage to buildings, roads, and utility systems by the storm raises the controversial question of whether areas of particular geographic vulnerability should be rebuilt, maintained and defended, or simply abandoned.”

Averne Avenue is located in FEMA Special Flood Hazard Area Zone A section of the Rockaways, a place that “experienced significant storm surge inundation” during the storm. Within the 80+ acre location at Averne East, the jury will be looking for imaginative yet practical designs for a “comprehensive, mixed-use, mixed-income, sustainable and storm-resilient community that will meet the new physical and regulatory challenges of waterfront development while maintaining a balance between innovation and affordability. Proposed solutions should promote new housing, employment, and recreational opportunities for area residents and visitors from throughout the region.”

To be specific, landscape architects and other design professionals proposing new design solutions will need to work with 1,500 units of housing, with a mix of low to mid-rise buildings; up to 500,000 square feet of commercial / recreational space; a 35 acre nature preserve; a 9 acre dune preserve; and 3.3 acres minimum of active and/or passive open space.

They add: “The project must incorporate all new infrastructure [roadways, water mains, sanitary and storm sewers, utilities, smart grids, etc.] and both active and passive landscaped open space on the site bordering the Atlantic Ocean waterfront. Proposals should emphasize sustainability and resiliency but present a quality, marketable, and constructable project.”

Once submissions are received, the jury, which includes landscape architect and ecologist Alex Felson, ASLA, will select four finalists. These finalists will each be provided with $30,000 to further flush out their concepts. The winner, who will be announced before the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, will receive an additional $30,000.

Submit your concepts by June 14.

Another design competition worth exploring: Washington, D.C.’s water utility, DC Water, just launched a $1 million green infrastructure competition to help the District fix its combined sewer overflow (CSO) problems. Green infrastructure projects can include green roofs, rain gardens, rain barrels, and pervious pavements, removing impervious surfaces, and using other natural means to capture and infiltrate rain water. They are targeting the Potomac and Rock Creek drainage areas in D.C.

They write: “This challenge will serve as a model to support DC Water’s proposal to conduct a large-scale, multi-million dollar demonstration project in the Potomac and Rock Creek sewersheds” and also help them “evaluate the feasibility of using green practices, in place of or in conjunction with ‘gray’ engineering solutions.”

Image credit: Rockaway, Queens / FAR ROC

Read Full Post »

greenroof
To celebrate High Performance Building Week, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is hosting a Congressional green roof reception and tour. Policymakers, design professionals, local media, and interested members of the public are encouraged attend.

In a presentation, ASLA CEO / Executive VP Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, will be covering the economic and environmental benefits of green roofs and green infrastructure. Somerville will explain how green infrastructure is a less expensive solution for controlling stormwater runoff, conserves water and improves water quality, reduces the urban heat island effect, lowers building energy use, improves air quality, stores carbon, and creates biohabitat.

The event is part of an annual set of discussions and tours organized by the High-Performance Buildings Caucus Coalition, a private sector group that works with the High-Performance Buildings Caucus of the U.S. Congress to showcase best practices in building and site design. The Congressional Caucus is focused on increasing awareness among policymakers about the “major impact buildings have on our health, safety and welfare and the opportunities to design, construct and operate high-performance buildings.”

When: Thursday, May 16, 2013, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Where: ASLA Headquarters’ Rooftop, 636 Eye Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20001

RSVP at governmentaffairs@asla.org by Friday, May 10th.

For questions or more information, please contact Roxanne Blackwell, Director, Federal Goverment Affairs, ASLA, at rblackwell@asla.org or 202-216-2334

This is a widely-attended event so attendance is permissible under both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate rules.

Image credit: ASLA Green Roof / ASLA

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 994 other followers