Inventive New Designs for D.C.’s 11th Street Bridge Park

balmori
11th Street Bridge Park Final Design Proposal / Balmori Associates / Cooper, Robertson & Partners

Six months ago, an exciting national design competition was launched for the 11th Street Bridge Park in Washington, D.C. Expected to cost upwards of $40 million, the new bridge park will run 900 feet over the foundation of an old freeway spanning the Anacostia River, connecting historic Capitol Hill and Anacostia neighborhoods and creating a new venue for “healthy recreation, environmental education, and the arts.” The organizers say this new park will benefit 80,000 people in the immediate neighborhoods and hundreds of thousands more throughout the district. It may also help boost efforts to further clean-up the sewage-filled Anacostia River, which is still unsafe to swim in, and restore more of the moribund river ecosystem.

Four design teams comprised of landscape architects, architects, and engineers have spent all summer creating new visions for this park, which will displayed publicly in multiple locations in the district over the next month. The four teams selected by the jury include:

  • Balmori Associates / Cooper, Robertson & Partners
  • OLIN / OMA
  • Stoss Landscape Urbanism / Höweler + Yoon Architecture
  • Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) / NEXT Architects / Magnusson Klemencic Associates

Scott Kratz, 11th Street Bridge Park Director, whose dedication is really what’s making this amazing park happen, said: “The variety among the different renderings is really quite remarkable. With these stunning and thoughtful designs, each team transformed community-inspired ideas into a Bridge Park that will quickly become a destination for residents and tourists alike.”

The designs propose creative solutions for solving tricky access problems. They all enable a mix of uses as well, with informal lawns and gathering spaces, restaurants, amphitheaters for events or concerts, playgrounds, and opportunities to just be immersed in the Anacostia River environment, which is slowly being restored. Each proposal also extends the experience past the bridge into the surrounding riverfronts, creating extensive parks, boardwalks, and boating facilities.

Here are brief accounts of each of the original proposals; titles link to the full exhibition boards:

Balmori Associates / Cooper, Robertson & Partners (see image above)

Balmori Associates and Cooper, Robertson & Partners aim to create a bridge park with a “clasp” at the center, one swelling biomorphic form that mirrors rounded shapes on either river bank. There are many reasons behind this form: “First and foremost, it creates a grand place where diverse communities can unite above the river and celebrate their shared interests. Second, its width creates the capacity to host great events and everyday life experiences simultaneously. Third, maximizing the distance that people can get from the existing 11th Street Bridge allows people to more fully engage and experience the edge of Bridge Park and the Anacostia River.”

Parts of the bridge would be open “apertures,” enabling people on the bridge a close-up view of the Anacostia River below. This design offers a new look at the local ecosystem, perhaps even an immersion in riparian nature. There are well thought-out connections between the proposed nature experience on the bridge and the surrounding communities as well.

OLIN / OMA

The OLIN and OMA team write: “Paths from each side of the river operate as springboards — sloped ramps that elevate visitors to look-out points to landmarks in either direction. Extending over the river, the Anacostia paths join to form a loop, embracing the path from the Navy Yard side and linking the opposing banks in a single gesture. The resulting form of the bridge creates an iconic encounter, an ‘X’ instantly recognizable as a new image for the river.”

Along the X-shaped park are a series of rectilinear rooms that separate out uses — from an amphitheater and public art park, to a restaurant and educational center. This team creates multiple levels, with an added upper deck where they propose an eye-catching waterfall. There is also a careful integration between the bridge and surrounding areas, with multiple human-scale paths leading from the riverfront on either side.

olin
11th Street Bridge Park Final Design Proposal / OLIN and OMA

Stoss Landscape Urbanism / Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Stoss Landscape Urbanism and Höweler + Yoon Architecture write: “Our proposal for the 11th Street Bridge Park puts in place a new crossing, one that establishes new connections across and to the Anacostia River and to the burgeoning and socially / culturally rich neighborhoods along its banks. The Crossing is a new place of convergence, of congregation, of cross-breeding. It is an incubator for social and community and civic life, and a model for building healthy bodies, healthy neighborhoods, and a healthy river environment.”

Their proposal offers a “flexible, adaptive” approach, with opportunities for healthy exercise and even food production spread throughout the new infrastructure. Their proposal has fewer defined zones; everything is mixed. This team makes a point of saying their proposal could be re-arranged depending on community input. Along the pier they propose new floating gardens accessible via angular decks that jut out into the Anacostia.

stoss
11th Street Bridge Park Final Design Proposal / Stoss Landscape Urbanism / Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) / NEXT Architects / Magnusson Klemencic Associates

Lastly, the WRT, Next, and Magnuson Klemencic team writes: “Anacostia Landing is the operative term that encapsulates the project goals. We take it to mean a great river park with a standout bridge, a place so distinctive that people will simply say “let’s go to the Anacostia!” anticipating hours of play, relaxation, eating, boating, learning about history, ecology and health; and otherwise enjoying art, theater, music, and performances on both sides of the river, gathering above it, or floating on its waters.”

They propose creating a “spiral and a funnel,” which will shape the structure of their bridge park and how visitors will access it. On one side, visitors will access the elevated park through a spiral staircase, taking them up into the upper decks. They will then move through the funnel into the expansive park, which offers lawns, an amphitheater, and a “fountain square” designed for kids. At the waterfront, they propose “curated ecologies,” with mussel beds to explore.

wrt
11th Street Bridge Park Final Design Proposal / Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) / NEXT Architects / Magnusson Klemencic Associates

Learn more about the final designs and then submit your vote, which will help the judges. The winning team will be announced on October 16.

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