Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (December 1 – 15)

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William B. Callaway / SWA Group

William B. Callaway, Noted Bay Area Landscape Architect, Dies – The San Francisco Chronicle, 12/5/14
“His Bay Area work was equally varied, be it Refuge Valley Community Park in Hercules with its gazebo and lake that are a popular backdrop for wedding and quinceañera photographs, or the ascending stacks of triangular granite in the plaza outside the 101 California St. office tower in San Francisco.”

Restoration of Mellon Square Inspires Book About the Modernist LandmarkThe Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 12/6/14
“As president and founder of The Cultural Landscape Foundation in Washington, D.C., Mr. Birnbaum championed the project because he knew of other significant landscapes that had already disappeared from cities and parks. Six months later, in June 2007, Meg Cheever, president and chief executive officer of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, took Susan Rademacher on a tour of the city’s historic parks — Frick, Schenley, Riverview and Highland — plus the Hill District.”

Presidio Park Project Lands Architect Behind High Line in N.Y. The San Francisco Chronicle, 12/9/14
“The selection of James Corner and his firm Field Operations comes after an unusual competition where five teams were asked to submit conceptual visions for the 13 acres that will blanket two automobile tunnels now under construction. The competition was overseen by the Presidio Trust, which manages nearly all of the 1,491-acre park at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge.”

2014’s Notable Developments in Landscape Architecture The Huffington Post, 12/10/14
“This year the single most notable development came courtesy of the New York Times architecture Michael Kimmelman critic who wrote: ‘Great public places and works of landscape architecture deserve to be treated like great buildings.'”

Why We Need Horticulturists The Washington Post, 12/10/14
“Horticulture is not a field that attracts enough young people — this is a constant lament of garden directors I meet. For all its imagined bliss, the life of a professional gardener can be hard, stressful, and anything but lucrative. It is a world of insect bites, near-heatstroke, and the steady degeneration of the spinal column.”

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