Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (April 16 – 30)

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A rendering of the forthcoming Presidio land development / The Atlantic

Disaster by Design: Houston Can’t Keep Developing This Way The Houston Chronicle, 4/20/16
“Let’s review the facts before this teachable moment fades away. We live on a very flat coastal plain — much of it only a four-foot drop over a mile. And much of it with very clayey, slow-to-drain soils.”

A One-Stop Guide to Designing the Streets of the Future City Lab, 4/22/16
“Not all urban planners or city governments agree on what kind of street designs are best. But one thing remains clear: Cities who want to plan for the future must prioritize transit accessibility.”

A Public Park for Dublin’s Liberties Within Reach for Locals The Irish Times, 4/22/16
“The steel gates on the fence surrounding a large derelict site in Dublin’s south inner city will be unlocked today as a community campaign to open a public park in the Liberties starts to bear fruit.”

This Water-Wise Landscape Should Answer Some QuestionsThe Sacramento Bee, 4/22/16
“As California’s drought dragged on year after year, local master gardeners kept getting the same question from worried homeowners: “What can I plant that won’t die?”

How Cities Can Revitalize Their Public Spaces The Wall Street Journal, 4/24/16
“What makes a city a great place to live and visit are the shared spaces in between—the sidewalks, the plazas, the parks, the waterfront, says landscape architect James Corner, the lead designer of New York’s High Line, a much-acclaimed park built on an obsolete elevated railroad spur that winds through portions of Manhattan below 34th Street.”

San Francisco’s Plan to Bury a Freeway The Atlantic, May 2016 Issue
“When the Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937, the road leading to it, a hulking viaduct of concrete and steel known as Doyle Drive, split the northern tip of San Francisco in two, cutting right through the Presidio, the U.S. Army base that guarded the mouth of San Francisco Bay. For as long as the Presidio remained a base, the land’s division into two pieces wasn’t a huge problem.”

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