Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (August 16–31)

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Site of Future Lucas Museum of Narrative Art / The Architect’s Newspaper

An Award-Winning Landscape Embraces Bay Views – Houzz, August 2014
“Landscape architect Scott Lewis repeats the sentiments of many architects and designers talking about their projects when he says that his favorite part of this project was witnessing its transformation. ‘I know what it looked like before,’ he says.”

Placemaking Done Right: Three Successful Approaches Planetizen, 8/19/14
“It is often hard to quantify what makes a place memorable, successful or special, but to paraphrase an old adage, ‘You know it when you see it.'”

Hollywood’s Freeway Cap Park Begins Environmental Review ProcessThe Architect’s Newspaper, 8/25/14
“The city of Los Angeles is now preparing an environmental impact report for the project. The park, located about four miles northwest of Downtown LA and about 500 feet north of the 101′s Hollywood Boulevard overpass, would be built on an engineered deck over the freeway.”

Landscape Architecture Makes Nashville a Better Place to Live  The Tenneseean, 8/26/14
“Developers that value landscape architecture are developers that value Nashville’s residents and communities.”

Can a Park Jumpstart a Neighborhood? The Boston Globe, 8/26/14
“The Lawn on D, a new temporary park at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, sits in what might seem like a bizarre spot to build a new outdoor space. It runs along a weird stretch of no-man’s-land on D Street in South Boston.”

Return of the JediThe Architect’s Newspaper, 8/28/14
“Pursued by both San Francisco and Los Angeles, George Lucas ultimately chose Chicago for his Museum of Narrative Art, an archive for the Hollywood icon’s extensive collection of movie memorabilia and modern art.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (August 1–15)

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Mia Lehrer / Metropolis

Mia Lehrer & the L.A. River – Metropolis, August 2014
“Defining large swaths of the city, it is perhaps the best lens through which to understand how Lehrer works … Her version of landscape architecture is more like alchemy, addressing landscape in a deeper, social sense.”

Will Toronto’s Ambitious Push to Grow its Urban Canopy Pay Off? – The Globe and Mail, 8/8/14
“The urban forest is an important part of the city’s identity, and city hall has made a formal commitment to increasing the number of trees – citing their environmental benefits as well as their positive impact on the city’s streetscapes.”

Do Evolving Neighborhoods Mean Dissolving Communities? Planetizen, 8/11/14
“As societal mores have loosened up and people become more willing to live next door to those who are different from them, these neighborhoods have come to seem less exotic and more desirable. In a certain way, places like Capitol Hill have become victims of their own success.”

New Queens Public Plaza Shows Public Space Doesn’t Take All That Much – The Architect’s Newspaper, 8/13/14
“Frankly, there’s not all that much to it – save for a new sidewalk, some planters, and a handful of bright bistro tables and chairs. But here’s what Bliss Plaza does have: People. And that’s the key.”

Geograph’s Quixotic Effort To Get Photos Of Every Square Kilometer Of Great Britain And Ireland FiveThirtyEight, 8/15/14
“Smartphone and digital-camera owners are collectively carrying out a worldwide data-collection task: photographing every nook and cranny of the world.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (July 16–31)

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Corktown Common Park, Toronto by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Arup / Arup

Made in the Shade: Landscaping in the Shadow of the High Line – Metropolis Magazine, 7/16/14
“The High Line proved to be the main site challenge, as it occupies much of the visual landscape and creates areas of permanent shade—limiting the plant palette and the ability to establish a lush, viable landscape.”

In Praise of Lurie Garden, Millennium Park’s Quiet Corner – Chicago Magazine, 7/18/14
“Sheltered from the city and the riotous expanse of the park by a dark curtain of evergreens, it’s less trod and less often regarded than the Bean’s plaza and the Crown Fountain, as appropriate for a sanctuary. It doesn’t get enough attention; it gets enough people.”

Bostonians Want Better Parks, More Farmer’s Markets & Preserved Historical Architecture BostInno, 7/22/14
“So why do people come to, and plant roots in, Boston? Is it its prestigious higher-ed institutions? Perhaps its the championship-caliber sports teams? A new survey done by collaborative design firm Sasaki Associates has the answer.”

New Toronto Park Is a Stormwater Treatment Plant in Disguise – The Architect’s Newspaper, 7/23/14
“Using Brooklyn Bridge Park and Hudson River Park as reference points, the reclaimed space has an array of natural plants, landscapes, ecosystems as well as lawns, athletic fields, picnic tables, play areas, and a pavilion that includes a community kitchen. That can all be seen at first glance, but the $27 million park was built as more than a play area—it was built to work.”

Hey, Mister, I’ve Got a Park I Can Sell You – The New York Times, 7/24/14
“It’s this juxtaposition of intimate little spaces and expansive views that makes the park so exhilarating and a place to return to in different light and seasons.”

At 93, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander Is Still One of Canada’s Most Beloved Landscape Architects The Globe and Mail, 7/25/14
“One of the most important landscape architects of the 20th century and a pioneer in the fields of green design and rooftop landscapes, she has spoken and written often about the ‘solace’ of trees.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (July 1 – 15)

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Dr. Robert Zarr leads a hike through a park in Washington, D.C. / Diana Bowen and National Park Service

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

The Music City’s New Urbanism: The Nine Projects Leading Nashville’s Transformation – The Architect’s Newspaper, 7/2/14
“New riverfront parks are transforming Nashville’s connection to the Cumberland River, bikeshare docks have appeared around downtown, bus rapid transit is in the works, and the city’s tallest tower is set to rise. And that’s just the start of it. Take a look at the city’s dramatic transformation and a peek at where it’s headed.”

America’s Leading Design Cities – CityLab, 7/8/14
“Where are the key clusters and geographic centers of design in America? Which are its leading design cities?”

How Chinese Urbanism Is Transforming African Cities Metropolis Magazine, 7/8/14
“The factory of the world has a new export: urbanism. More and more Chinese-made buildings, infrastructure, and urban districts are sprouting up across Africa, and this development is changing the face of the continent’s cities.”

To Make Children Healthier, a Doctor Prescribes a Trip to the Park – NPR, 7/14/14
“About 40 percent of Zarr’s young patients are overweight or obese, which has led the doctor to come up with ways to give them very specific recommendations for physical activity. And that has meant mapping out all of the parks in the District of Columbia — 380 parks so far.”

AILA Launches the Program for Australia’s First Landscape Architecture Festival – World Landscape Architecture, 7/15/14
“The festival to be held in Brisbane from 16th to 18th of October to explore, define and forecast Landscape Architecture from differing perspectives. The Festival program includes exhibition, walks, self-guided walks, a research forum and conference.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (June 16 – 30)

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Russell Page Garden at the Frick Collection / Danielle Rollins via Pinterest

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

The Green Lawn: American Staple or Water Waster?The San Francisco Chronicle, 6/17/14
“As California faces its worst drought in decades, residents are being asked to make sacrifices to save water: take shorter showers, launder less and forgo the occasional flush. For some, though, the biggest hardship has been surrendering the vigor of a bright green lawn.”

Motor City’s First Buffered Bike Lanes Planned for MidtownThe Architect’s Newspaper, 6/18/14
“Given the severity and number of challenges facing Detroit, streetscape improvements might not seem like a very high priority. But in the Motor City’s Midtown, one of the city’s relatively resurgent neighborhoods, a local planning non-profit is betting that encouraging more bicyclists and pedestrians will be a boon for the area. As a result, Detroit may soon get its first buffered bike lanes. Between Temple Street and Warren Avenue, Midtown’s 2nd Avenue is the target of a substantial road diet, as first reported by ModeShift.”

Long-Forgotten Landscape Architect Helped Save the Indiana DunesWBEZ 91.5, 6/19/14
“As the temperature rises, thousands will be flocking to the Indiana Dunes this summer. But if it weren’t for a little-known landscape architect, the miles of beaches along southern Lake Michigan might not exist today.”

A Playful Pop-Up at Spruce Street Harbor ParkThe Philadelphia Inquirer, 6/28/14
“Last summer, landscape architect David Fierabend was tasked with turning a vacant lot on Broad Street into a peaceful pop-up garden for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. The best indication that his woodland garden – shaded by a copse of graceful honey locusts – had succeeded? How little visitors noticed his handiwork.”

Here’s What’s Missing in the Debate over the Frick Collection’s Proposed ExpansionThe Huffington Post, 6/30/14
“The announcement that the Frick Collection on New York’s Upper East Side plans to build an addition has generated some buzz and concern – and if implemented, it would forever destroy an important part of the collection – an exquisite garden by the world famous British landscape architect Russell Page (1906-85).”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (June 1 – 15)

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Buhl Community Park by Andrea Cochran / Cooper-Hewitt National Design Awards. photos by Marion Brenner and Ed Massery.

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Does Beauty Still Matter?Planetizen, 6/1/14
“There was a time, not too long ago, when the quality of urban landscapes was determined by what they looked like and what it was like to be in them. Their ecological and human health benefits were well known, but these were seen mainly as positive by-products of what was more important: improving the quality of life for people living in cities by providing them with access to nature, or at least some semblance of it. The desire for urban parks was rooted in a simple, yet deep appreciation for the beauty of landscape.”

New Desalination Technologies Spur Growth in Recycling WaterYale Environment 360, 6/3/14
“A ferry plows along San Francisco Bay, trailing a tail of churned up salt, sand, and sludge and further fouling the already murky liquid that John Webley intends to turn into drinking water. But Webley, CEO of a Bay Area start-up working on a new, energy-skimping desalination system, isn’t perturbed.”

Levees Could Protect Lower Manhattan From Future FloodsCurbed, 6/6/14
“If another Sandy-like storm hits New York City, the city government wants southern Manhattan to be much better protected than it was during the devastating 2012 hurricane, from which recovery is still incomplete. So, the New York City Economic Development Corporation and the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency have an idea—they could not stress enough that this is just an idea—to extend Manhattan with a 1.3-mile-long living barrier made up of a multi-purpose levee system.”

Meet University of Virginia’s New Architecture Dean, Elizabeth MeyerThe Architect’s Newspaper, 6/6/14
“Elizabeth K. Meyer has been appointed as the dean for the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. Her two-year term starts July 15th. Meyer received both her bachelor’s and master’s degree in landscape architecture from UVA before going on to teach at Harvard for four years. In 2012, President Obama selected her to serve on the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts. Meyers was the only landscape architect on the panel of seven.”

Honors > National Design Awards The Architect’s Newspaper, 6/12/14
“The Landscape Architecture award went to Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture, a firm with a focus on sustainability efforts and a strong sense of detail.” See more photos of Cochran’s work.

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper-Halpin, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (May 16 – 31)

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Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout by Dan Graham / Metropolitan Museum of Art via The Architect’s Newspaper

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Grand Dames of the GardensThe New York Times, 5/16/14
“There are two major gardens here designed by this first generation of important female landscape architects: the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden created by Beatrix Farrand in 1916 and the 15 acres of Benenson Ornamental Conifers, its core by Marian Coffin in 1949.”

Chelsea Flower Show: The Pop-up Gardens Refreshing City CentersThe Financial Times, 5/16/14
“For Deborah Nagan, the Fringe is where ‘people from vastly different spheres of design are united by their love of plants.’ Nagan is a busy landscape architect, but her playfulness and purpose is visible to everyone looking out from a No. 3 bus from Brixton to London Bridge: hers is the only front garden which displays tomatoes entwined around elegant architectural structures.”

Artistic Landscape Architecture Brings a Sense of BelongingThe San Francisco Chronicle, 5/17/14
“When five of the nation’s leading landscape architects gathered before their peers last weekend in Berkeley, the projects they discussed were located in Massachusetts and Minnesota, China and Spain.”

The Energetic City: Design Trust Calls on Designers to Create Connected Public SpaceThe Architect’s Newspaper, 5/21/14
“The Design Trust has launched pivotal projects before, like their Five Borough Farm that is helping to redefine urban agriculture in New York City. This time, the group is seeking new ideas for public space and, according to a statement, “develop new forms of connectivity among the diverse people, systems, and built, natural, and digital environments of New York City.”

Dan Graham’s Rooftop Pavilion at the Metropolitan Museum Reflects on Public SpaceThe Architect’s Newspaper, 5/29/14
“One of the great gifts bestowed on New York in the summer is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s roof garden. You are thrust into Olmsted’s Central Park from a promontory surrounded by the perimeter skyline on all sides.”

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper-Halpin, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (May 1 – 15)

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Central Falls Comprehensive Master Plan / Brown University and RISD

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Landscape and MemoryPlaces, 5/5/14
“I’ve never seen war photographs like Jo Röttger’s. The structure of his project Landscape and Memory is familiarly photojournalistic—Röttger accompanies a German military unit as they train in Saxony-Anhalt, deploy to Afghanistan and return to Germany—but the work is an unusual hybrid of genres.”

Five Landscape Designers and Architects Who Pair Soil with Toil The New York Post, 5/6/14
“Back in 2004, Oudolf was charged with ‘illustrating a series of moods, capturing open woodland, prairie and meadow’ in one of the densest—yet most underutilized—spots in the city. Today, the famed Dutch horticulturalist’s 1¹/₂-mile-long plantings on the High Line provide a giraffe’s-eye view onto the Hudson and West Chelsea. The breezy, carefree space is enough to inspire even the most jaded New Yorker.”

HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan on How Design can Prepare Us for Climate ChangeFast Company Design, 5/6/14
“In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development launched Rebuild by Design, a design competition aimed at developing innovative storm resilience strategies in the places that Sandy devastated.”

Millennium Park Turns TenThe Architect’s Newspaper, 5/13/14
“Happy birthday, Millennium Park! Yes, the Chicago park named for the chronological milestone now 14 years in the rearview mirror is turning 10—it went famously over-schedule and over-budget but we love it nonetheless. Last year 4.75 million people visited Chicago’s front yard, taking in free concerts and events, and probably taking at least as many selfies with Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate and the flowing titanium locks of Frank Gehry‘s Pritzker Pavilion in the background.”

Brown, RISD Students Unveil Plan to Transform Central Falls’ Urban Landscape The Providence Journal, 5/13/14
“Elizabeth Dean Hermann, a professor of landscape architecture at RISD, said that as many as 100 students from Brown, RISD and Javeriana University in Bogota, Colombia, will flood Central Falls this summer with plans to help turn around the city that emerged from bankruptcy less than two years ago.”

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper-Halpin, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (April 16 – 30)

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Meditation labyrinth by Beth Henson. Louisville Lots of Possibility competition. / The Architect’s Newspaper

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Gustafson Guthrie Nichol Imagines a Pedestrian-friendly SeattleThe Architect’s Newspaper, 4/16/14
“The streets of downtown Seattle are set for a major overhaul, thanks to a new master plan by Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. As AN reported in our recent West Coast edition, the Seattle-based firm has made recommendations to improve the pedestrian realm ‘centers on uniting the fragmented parts of the Pike-Pine corridor, two major thoroughfares at the heart of the retail core running east-west from Interstate 5 to the waterfront.’”

Green Roofs Keep Pollutants out of Urban WaterwaysAmerican University News, 4/17/14
“Rooftop gardens, or green roofs, are known to reduce energy use in buildings and catch stormwater runoff, but new research from American University shows that green roofs also absorb pollutants. The research, which takes on an area that previously has not been explored widely by scientists, has implications for how cities can improve the health of their rivers, streams and estuaries.”

Designing Cities and Factories with Urban Agriculture in MindThe Guardian, 4/23/14
“Urban farms are transforming inner city spaces – rooftops, infrastructure, streetscapes, building skin – into generative ecologies that support the lives of people, and pollinators too. They are bringing into cities, and into plain view, the natural systems that sustain urban life.”

Frederick Law Olmsted, Poet of the Urban LandscapeThe Boston Globe, 4/25/14
“If leaving the world in better condition than you found it is a measure of greatness, Olmsted deserves to rank high on our list of great Americans. Working in the second half of the 19th century, a time of disorientingly rapid industrialization and urbanization, he did more than anyone else to make our cities livable, humane, and inspiring.”

Louisville Names Winners in Competition to Creatively Reuse Abandoned Lots Across the CityThe Architect’s Newspaper, 4/28/14
“In January, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer implored local designers and developers to propose ideas for 250 of the city’s several thousand vacant lots. Last week they announced four winners, which included gardens of dye plants for local textile production; a Habitat for Humanity–style homeownership program; environmental remediation via lavender fields; and meditation gardens made of recycled materials.”

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper-Halpin, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (April 1 – 15)

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The Protective Shallows. Rebuilt by Design proposal by Scape/Landscape Architecture with Parsons Brinckerhoff, Dr. Philip Orton / Stevens Institute of Technology, Ocean & Coastal Consultants, SeArc Ecological Consulting, LOT-EK, MTWTF, The Harbor School and Paul Greenberg.

For more LA in the News, check out LAND, ASLA’s newsletter. If you see others you’d like included, please email us at info@asla.org.

Designing Outdoor Spaces to Fit Specific Patient PopulationsHealthcare Design Magazine, 4/1/14
“Patients using the garden could include a person awaiting minor surgery; someone recovering from a hip replacement who is urged to walk and seeks smooth pathways with frequent places to stop and rest; a person who has received outpatient chemotherapy and needs to recuperate—in the shade—before driving home; or a sick child being wheeled through a garden as respite from frightening medical procedures.”

Landscape Architects Edwina von Gal, Mikyoung Kim and Kate Orff Share their Favorite ThingsThe Wall Street Journal, 4/3/14
“Three trailblazing landscape designers are unearthing ways to improve the boundaries where man meets nature, using everything from oyster beds to interactive color walls to ensure that new developments harmoniously exist alongside their natural environments.”

10 Design Ideas to Prepare Us for the Next SandyNew York, 4/3/14
“‘If we put back what was there before, that’s a failure from the start,’ says Henk Ovink, a lean, bald, hyperintense water-management expert who organized Rebuild by Design while on loan from the Dutch government. The future will not be dry.”

Rebuild by Design Redesigns Sandy-Battered ShoreArchitectural Record, 4/7/14
“Protective sand islands in long narrow threads would run along the Atlantic seacoast from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to Cape May, New Jersey, in one of the most ambitious proposals unveiled last week by Rebuild by Design. The program is a high-speed, invited competition sponsored by a presidential task force, guided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and others.

Dan Kiley’s LandscapesThe Washington Post, 4/11/14
“From his longtime home studio in Vermont, Dan Kiley could see low-slung mountains, rippling Lake Champlain and trees grouped thickly and randomly. But when the influential landscape architect went to work, he emulated not such natural vistas but the geometric layouts of both baroque and modernist France.”

Vision 42 Design Competition Asks Designers to Re-Imagine 42nd Street without CarsThe Architect’s Newspaper, 4/15/14
“The Institute for Rational Urban Mobility is hosting the just-announced Vision42 Design Competition calling on architects, designers, and transportation gurus to re-imagine one of the most iconic (and congested) streets in New York City—42nd Street.”

These articles were compiled by Phil Stamper-Halpin, ASLA Public Relations and Communications Coordinator.