Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (January 1 – 15)

Seattle’s Asian Art Museum by LMN Architects and landscape architecture firm Walker Macy / copyright Tim Griffiths

My Internship at Palm Beach County Parks and Rec FIU News, 1/3/20
“During my time, I met landscape architects, directors, contractors, commissioners, as well as many other types of people. I didn’t try to only talk to designers or those who would help me in the future. I was just friendly and enjoyed each day as it came. By doing this, I would just stumble across friends.”

Landscape Architect Dorothée Imbert Picked to Lead Knowlton School of Architecture – Archinect, 1/9/20
“Landscape Architect and educator Dorothée Imbert has been named as the new Director of the Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University.”

City’s Plan to Remove Trees From Fort Greene Park Hits a Snag The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 1/13/20
“Activists won a new round in their legal fight against a city project that would remove dozens of mature, healthy trees from Fort Greene Park and destroy park features designed by famous landscape artists.”

Seattle’s Asian Art Museum Readies for Reopening After Renovation and Expansion Designboom, 1/14/20
“following a 24-month-long renovation and expansion, Seattle’s asian art museum will reopen to the public on February 8, 2020. the museum’s historic 1933 building closed in early 2017 to address critical needs of infrastructure, accessibility, and program space. now enhanced with a design by LMN Architects, working alongside landscape architect walker macy, the building reopens as ‘a modern museum within an historic icon’.”

Landscape Architect Appointed to Piccadilly Gardens Insider Media, 1/14/20
“A landscape architecture practice has been appointed to produce concept designs for improvements to Piccadilly Gardens and the surrounding area.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (December 16 – 31)

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Millennium Park in Chicago / Photo Credit: Jakob von Raumer

Weiss/Manfredi’s ‘Loops and Lenses’ Concept Wins La Brea Tar Pits Redesign CommissionKCRW, 12/17/19
“One of LA’s most beloved sites is the La Brea Tar Pits, consisting of a park, pools of asphalt in which are trapped fiberglass mammoths; and the 1977 George C. Page Museum, embedded in a raised mound, or berm, that children love to roll down.”

Professor Invents Wearable Garden Fertilized by Human WasteThe New York Post, 12/18/19
“Aroussiak Gabrielian, a landscape architecture professor at the University of Southern California, has created the world’s first wearable farm, which can grow a variety of fresh produce using fertilizer supplied by your own human waste.”

Thomas Woltz CLAD, 12/22/19
“Thomas Woltz, owner of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, leads one of the most revered landscape architecture firms on the planet. Kath Hudson caught up with him while he was on a fact-finding mission, camping on the Montana plains.”

Column: Rating Chicago’s Latest Wave of Parks and Public Spaces by the Three ‘E’s: They’re Better on Entertainment and Ecology than Equity The Chicago Tribune, 12/24/19
“Beginning with the triumphant opening of Millennium Park in 2004, a remarkable collection of new public spaces has sprung up, like spring blossoms, in Chicago.”

Mikyoung Kim and DiMella Shaffer Will Design Boston’s First LGBTQ-friendly Senior Housing Facility The Architect’s Newspaper, 12/14/19
“Boston will get its first LGBTQ-friendly senior housing facility, designed by Boston-based architecture firm DiMella Shaffer and landscape architecture by Mikyoung Kim Design.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (December 1 – 15)

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The fountain of Bartholdi Park in Washington, D.C. / Sdkb [CC BY-SA 4.0]

Next to the Botanic Garden Is Another, Tinier Green Refuge – DCist, 12/3/19
“Bartholdi Park isn’t exactly hidden. Located at a busy intersection next to the Botanic Garden (which is celebrating its bicentennial this coming year) and mere steps from the U.S. Capitol, it’s got prime real estate. And that’s kinda the point.”

2019’s Notable Developments in Landscape Architecture – The Cultural Landscape Foundation, 12/6/19
“In 2019 landscape architecture’s greatest impact continued to be in the public realm.”

On the Rooftops of Paris, a New Kind of Urban Garden – The New York Times Style Magazine, 12/7/19
“The landscape architect Arnaud Casaus is creating green spaces wilder and warmer than those found at street level.”

MVRDV Unveils Plan to Transform Seoul’s Waterfront with ‘the Weaves’ – Designboom, 12/10/19
“MVRDV has won a competition to redesign Seoul’s Tancheon Valley and waterfront with a network of pedestrian and bicycle paths, natural landscapes, and public amenities.”

The Floating Utopia of Salesforce Park – The New Yorker, 12/11/19
“San Francisco’s newest public space reflects Big Tech’s influence—and a city’s anxieties.”

The Architect Who’s Confronting Climate Change – Curbed, 12/13/139
“Pamela Conrad is out to restore nature to our cities—and help them face future ecological disasters.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (November 16 – 30)

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View down Main Street USA at Disneyland / Photo Credit: Roman Eugeniusz [CC BY-SA 3.0]

Walter Hood Digs DeepArchitectural Digest, 11/18/19
“The Oakland, California–based landscape designer, fresh off a string of prestigious design prize wins, has an approach that embraces the eccentricities of people and place.”

Podcast: Culture and Race Within Landscape ArchitectureAuthentic F&F, 11/18/19
“Listen to Ujijji discuss how she aims to promote change through landscape architecture, urban design, and an awareness of African American history across landscapes.”

10 Questions: Napa Landscape Architect Makes The Outside Look Sharp – Napa Valley Register, 11/19/19
“Susan Heiken said one of the best things about being a landscape architect is that “you are always learning something new.”

New Renderings Show 72,600-square-foot Public Park Coming to Brooklyn’s Pacific Park Development – 6sqft, 11/19/19
“Developer TF Cornerstone this week released new renderings for two sites within Brooklyn’s long-delayed Pacific Park development that have yet to break ground: 615 and 595 Dean Street.”

Dreaming Up Disneyland – The New York Times, 11/25/19
“Those who knew Walt Disney often described him as an uncomplicated man of conventional 20th-century sensibilities: a lover of model trains, farm animals, lunch-wagon food, hard work, evening belts of scotch and endless Chesterfield cigarettes. One of his rituals upon coming home from his movie studio was feeding his poodle, Duchess, a cold frankfurter, or “wienie,” by leading her from room to room while throwing pieces on the floor.”

Prospect Park Tackles Toxic Algae Blooms With Nature-Based Technology – Gothamist, 11/26/19
“For years people have walked by NYC’s urban lakes and ponds without knowing what the green stuff in the water really is. But dog owners in Prospect Park may know all too well: It’s toxic algae bloom.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (November 1 – 15)

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Freeway Park, Seattle, Washington / Photo Credit Brianc333a [CC BY-SA 4.0]

Seattle’s Brutalist Freeway Park is Reviewed for National Register and Approved for RenovationThe Architect’s Newspaper,11/5/19
“The gorgeously staggered concrete elements of Jim Ellis Freeway Park, one of the most significant architectural spaces in Seattle, are scattered across a thickly forested hill atop an intersection of Interstate 5 between the neighborhoods of Downtown Seattle and First Hill.”

East Baltimore Redevelopment Project Moves Forward As Construction Begins The Baltimore Sun, 11/7/19
“With construction of the first building in an $889 million revitalization project in East Baltimore already underway, developers and architects have presented city officials the latest design plans for another building.”

Presidio Tunnel Tops Project Kicks Off With Pelosi In Attendance, Completion Due in 2021SFist, 11/7/19
“The official ‘groundmaking’ ceremony was held Thursday to kick off the process of building and landscaping what will create 14 acres of parkland over the top of the 101 freeway tunnels near the Golden Gate Bridge, connecting the Presidio to Crissy Field.”

Parkside Project Created to be ‘Uniquely Birmingham’ AL.com, 11/7/19
“The Powell Avenue Steam Plant powered Birmingham’s growth for more than a century. Now an ambitious plan hopes to resurrect it to connect a revitalized Magic City.”

Fall in Storm King Washington Square News, 11/15/19
“But despite the trek, there is an incredible institution upstate that will be worth your time: the Storm King Art Center.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (October 16 – 31)

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The Oakland A’s Citi Field /  Dicklyon, Creativecommons

As Waters Rise, So Do Concerns For Sports Teams Along Coast The Washington Post, 10/16/19
“A number of American pro sports venues could be vulnerable to rising waters brought on by climate change.”

The Gentrification Effect of Urban Parks Planetizen, 10/21/19
“New research finds that different types of parks correlate with different gentrification effects, adding to the complexity of urban change.”

The Parks That Made the Man Who Made Central ParkThe New York Times, 10/30/19
“Frederick Law Olmsted’s tours of English parks shaped his vision of landscape design. You can see his inspiration in three dimensions by touring five of them.”

Pier 55’s Thomas Heatherwick-Designed Park Is Taking Shape Curbed NY, 10/30/19
“The futuristic Pier 55 park designed by Thomas Heatherwick and financed by billionaire mogul Barry Diller is taking shape on the Hudson River.”

Columbia Pitches $18 Million Plan to Overhaul Finlay Park The Free Times, 10/31/19
“Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin and other city officials announced on Thursday an $18 million plan to revamp battered, aging Finlay Park.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (October 1 – 15)

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ASLA 2019 Honor Award in General Design, The High Line, Section 2, James Corner Field Operations / Iwan Baan

Hidden Esplanade Garden of Landscape Architect Rene Fransen Is Lush in Shades of GreenThe Times-Picayune, 10/2/19
“Most French Quarter gardens are hidden from public view, secreted behind masonry walls, glimpsed only through an open gate. Removed from the scrutiny of passersby, they provide their owners with a respite from the busy goings-on of the Vieux Carre.”

Landscape Prize Honors Cornelia Hahn OberlanderThe New York Times, 10/3/19
“Cornelia Hahn Oberlander is widely regarded as the grande dame of landscape architecture. Now she is the inspiration for a new biennial $100,000 international landscape prize established by the Cultural Landscape Foundation. The prize is named in honor of the 98-year-old Ms. Oberlander.”

Amid the Smoke of a Burning Amazon Rises the Specter of the Artist Roberto Burle MarxThe Washington Post, 10/3/19
“He was a landscape architect, a painter, a ceramist, a textile artist and more. But it was his other and lesser-known incarnations, as a plant explorer and conservationist, that came sharply into focus as the exhibition played out in the botanical garden’s grounds, conservatories and galleries in the Bronx. The reason: The Amazon is on fire.”

8 Notable NYC Projects Designed by Latino ArchitectsCurbed NY, 10/4/19
“A principal at James Corner Field Operations, Puerto Rican landscape architect Isabel Castilla worked as the lead designer and project manager for the High Line at the Rail Yards, which opened in 2014.”

Student, Landscape Architects Create 1967 Fire MemorialCornell Chronicle, 10/8/19
“A new memorial in the center of campus, created this summer and designed by a landscape architect student, serves as a contemplative reminder of eight students and a professor who died in a tragic fire in 1967 at the off-campus Cornell Heights Residential Club.”

AN Rounds Up the Best Landscape Architecture Lectures Nationwide The Architect’s Newspaper, 10/10/19
“America’s top architecture and design schools are filling out their lecture series line-ups with leading thought leaders in landscape architecture and design. Coast-to-coast, AN has selected six of these can’t-miss lectures that delve into issues such as climate change, urban beautification, the ecology of memory, and more.”

PARK(ing) Day: Small Spaces, Big Impact

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2ooY9lB4IR/

On September 20, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) and its members celebrated PARK(ing) Day, a growing global event that demonstrates just how much room parking spaces take up in our streets and how those spaces could instead be transformed into usable spaces for pedestrians. PARK(ing) Day encourages landscape architects, community members, and students to transform metered parking spaces into temporary parklets.

This year, ASLA collaborated with our neighbors, landscape architecture firm Lee & Associates, to design a parklet in front of ASLA’s headquarters in Chinatown. The parklet encouraged passersby to sit, take part in interactive activities aimed at informing the public about the effects of climate change, and then to go across the sidewalk to visit ASLA’s exhibition: Smart Policies for a Changing Climate.

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ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture / ASLA
Smart Policies for a Changing Climate exhibition / EPNAC

ASLA members from across the county also hosted parklets that show how small spaces can have big impact. For example, Landscape Architecture Bureau in Washington, D.C. used their parking space to “highlight the important role that pollinating insects play in natural and designed landscapes.”

Trueform Landscape Architecture Studio in Phoenix, Arizona, used magazine clippings to create a participatory art installation that brought the community together.

The Utah Chapter of ASLA used their space to get active on a rainy Friday afternoon.

Finally, the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design at the University of Arkansas designed a spot to relax after a long week of classes.

To see more of the parklets ASLA members designed on PARK(ing) Day, visit asla.org/parkingday.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (September 16 – 30)


Long-Neglected North End of Central Park Will Get a $150 Million Revamp
Architect’s Newspaper, 9/18/19
“The northern end of Central Park is slated to get a major upgrade by 2024. Today the Central Park Conservancy and the New York City Parks Department unveiled its plans for a $150 million restoration of the long-damaged landscape surrounding the Harlem Meer.”

How MacArthur Fellowship Winner Walter Hood Turns Landscapes into Sculpture, The Los Angeles Times, 9/25/19
“Hood, 61, defies easy categorization. He takes an architectural and fine arts approach to creating ‘ecologically and culturally sustainable’ public spaces, he said, often transforming neglected urban areas for marginalized communities.”

Walter Hood, MacArthur ‘Genius’ Grant Winner, Will Transform Oakland Museum of CaliforniaCurbed San Francisco, 9/27/19
“The lauded landscape architect will turn the museum into a more publicly-friendly space.”

Everything About the Pacific Northwest Is on Display At the New Burke Museum. Even the Scientists.Crosscut, 9/28/19
“The surroundings of the museum will feature some 80,000 native plants of 60 different species representing different parts of Washington state, ones genetically tied to the region.”

This New 1.6 Acre Metro Vancouver Park is on Top of A Parking Lot Vancouver is Awesome, 9/28/19
“Ketcheson Park, which officially opened Saturday, is situated on top of the two-story parking lot at the new Concord Gardens development at the corner of Ketcheson Road and Hazelbridge Way, and was created by Concord.”

Levi’s Stadium Greenroof & Rooftop Farm Greenroofs.com, 9/30/19
“Since the summer of 2016, the home of the 49ers has been cultivating a variety of crops on their Faithful Farm stadium roof.”

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (September 1 – 15)

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Skate Park in Santa Monica, California / Jukka from Helsinki, Finland

Skateboarding and the CityPlanetizen, 9/4/19
“Skateboarding is becoming a legitimate part of the urban landscape by revitalizing public spaces and engaging young people and the broader community.”

Washington D.C.’s Kennedy Center Opens the REACH with 16-day Performance Festival  – Wallpaper, 9/8/19
“The Kennedy Center celebrates the opening of its $250 million expansion, the REACH, with a 16-day festival of music, dance, and performing arts events starting this weekend.”

New Urban Park Will Provide Much-Needed Green Space to Downtown W-S  – Winston-Salem Monthly, 9/9/19
“The Creative Corridors Coalition’s work may not be finished when the Business 40 bridges and enhancement projects end in 2020.”

The New Architecture: Sky Parks, Tidal Pools, and ‘Solar Carving’  – The New York Times, 9/13/19
“Can buildings be more porous, more open to the vitality of the surrounding city? As with the creation of the great urban parks of the 19th century, designers today are rebalancing the relationship between architecture and nature, with the goal of increasing the quality of life, especially in urban settings.”

10,000 Cabbages Growing in Garfield Park for New ‘Living Exhibit’  – WTTW, 9/13/19
“A pair of Danish architects hope to make a statement with a new ‘living exhibit’ opening next week in Garfield Park featuring lots and lots of cabbages – 10,000 of them, to be exact.”