Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (May 1-15, 2022)

Lane Closures / Chris Yarzab, CC BY-ND 2.0.

MUSK SEE: Three Reasons Why Congestion Decreases When Cities ‘Delete’ Road Lanes — 05/13/2022, Streetsblog USA
“A wildly inaccurate comment from Elon Musk about the traffic impacts of deleting lanes for drivers is prompting a conversation about the little-known phenomenon of ‘reduced demand’ — and how advocates can better debunk common congestion myths that powerful, but often ill-informed, people continue to promulgate.”

Lawns Are Terrible for the Environment. California’s Water Restrictions May Finally Kill Them — 05/12/2022, Fast Company
“Landscape designers weigh in on how drought conditions could change the look of Southern California — and eventually the rest of the West.”

Ukraine’s ‘Hero River’ Helped Save Kyiv. But What Now for Its Newly Restored Wetlands? — 05/11/2022, The Guardian
“Kyiv repelled Russian forces by opening a Soviet-era dam on the Irpin River. Now, ecologists hope Ukraine’s newest wetlands can survive, or even thrive, after the war.”

Security Features For Outdoor Living Trend In Latest Houzz Survey — 05/10/22, Forbes
“It’s no secret that outdoor living has become a huge trend. ‘It has exploded over the past five years with homeowners desiring to have resort-like backyards,’ declares Reno-based landscape architect and franchisor Ron DuHamel, president of FireSky.

How a Los Angeles Landscape Architecture Firm Is Reclaiming a Hillside for Native Plants — 05/10/2022, Dwell
“Terremoto is spearheading an experimental grassroots project to transform a neglected patch of public land with native species.”

Justice Department Unveils New Environmental Justice Moves (2) — 05/05/2022, Bloomberg Law
“The Department of Justice announced a trio of major environmental justice actions on Thursday, including the launch of a new office and the resurrection of a popular enforcement tool scrapped during the Trump administration.”

A Smarter Urban Design Concept for a Town Decimated by Wildfires — 05/03/2022, Fast Company
“SWA Group—a winner of Fast Company’s 2022 World Changing Ideas Awards—is helping Paradise, California, imagine a safer and more sustainable future with a design that buffers the town with parks, athletic fields, and orchards—areas less likely to burn than forests.”

Removing Benches, Blocking Cycle Paths: Why Are Police Interfering in the UK’s Public Spaces? — 05/02/2022, The Guardian
“The Secured by Design initiative is damaging British cities, robbing them of greenery and public amenities while promoting fear.”

New Park Brings Residents of Los Angeles’ Chinatown Together — 05/01/2022, Parks and Recreation Business
“Designed by the landscape architecture and planning firm, AHBE/MIG, Ord and Yale Street Park represents the transformation of a once-vacant, one-acre hillside into a new pocket neighborhood park for the community.”

World Landscape Architecture Month 2022 Instagram Contest Winners

Image: Meadow landscape. Marcus Barnett Studio / Mimi Connolly

Throughout April, landscape architects around the globe celebrated World Landscape Architecture (WLAM) by exploring: What is landscape architecture? What does landscape architecture mean to you?

Thousands of #WLAM2022 posts across all social platforms reflected on the theme.

During the week of Frederick Law Olmsted’s 200th birthday, National ASLA shared the top five most popular #WLAM2022 Instagram posts, with Marcus Barnett Studio taking the number one spot (see above).

The other top four posts included Ten Eyck Landscape Architects highlighting a fundamental of their practice: understanding native plant communities.

TBG Partners offered a behind-the-scenes look at a landscape architect’s design process.

hochC Landschaftsarchitekten showed how landscape architects turn ideas into reality.

Hoerr Schaudt reflected on what landscape architecture means to them.

Some other #WLAM2022 highlights: At Ball State University, landscape architecture students explored the topic through a classroom assignment. Kansas State University highlighted how attending LABash 2022 at Louisiana State University allowed their team to connect with landscape architecture professionals and students from across the country.

Like Jennifer Nitzky, ASLA, some practitioners advocated for landscape architecture with presentations and hands-on demonstrations at local schools.

Several ASLA Chapters hosted Instagram takeovers. Posts featuring awards and achievements showcased diverse talents and contributions from the profession.

Many celebrated Frederick Law Olmsted’s 200th birthday, like the University of California at Davis Sheepmowers, joined by Olmsted’s great-granddaughter to honor the occasion.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (April 16-30, 2022)

Olmsted Park, Boston and Brookline, MA, 2013 / Marion Pressley

Uncovering the Hidden Gems of Frederick Law Olmsted, the Father of American Parks — 04/26/2022, Fast Company
“Olmsted is best known for designing Central Park, but he also designed hundreds of other spaces around the country. A new guide highlights some of his lesser-known works.”

Meet the Future of Landscape: Three Firms in Pursuit of a Better, Greener World — 04/26/2022, Cultured
“Three young landscape design studios—Future Green Studio, Studio Zewde and Terremoto—demand attention as they lead the way in changing practice principles for the betterment of our world.”

San Francisco Bans Cars from the Heart of Its Biggest Park? — 04/26/2022, Bloomberg CityLab
“Lawmakers are debating whether to keep vehicles off a major road in Golden Gate Park. But opponents of the car ban worry about disability access and other issues.”

A Quiet Revolution: Southwest Cities Learn to Thrive Amid Drought — 04/26/2022, Yale Environment 360
“Facing a changing climate, southwestern U.S. cities such as San Diego, Phoenix, and Las Vegas have embraced a host of innovative strategies for conserving and sourcing water, providing these metropolitan areas with ample water supplies to support their growing populations.”

Parched Southern California Takes Unprecedented Step of Restricting Outdoor Watering — 04/26/2022, The Guardian
“Metropolitan water district of southern California’s resolution will limit outdoor watering to just one day per week for district residents supplied by a stressed system of canals, pipelines, reservoirs and hydroelectric power plants called the State Water Project, which supplies water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to 27 million Californians and 750,000 acres of farmland.”