ASLA Convenes Blue Ribbon Panel on Climate Change and Resilient Design

From top: ASLA 2016 Professional Analysis and Planning Honor Award. The Big U, New York, NY. BIG and Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners. ASLA 2015 Professional General Design Honor Award. Perez Art Museum Miami: Resiliency by Design, Miami, Florida. ArquitectonicaGEO / copyright Robin Hill. Living Breakwaters, Staten Island, NY. SCAPE Landscape Architecture. ASLA 2016 Professional Communications Honor Award. Sea Change: Boston, Boston, MA. Sasaki Associates.

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is convening a blue ribbon panel to make comprehensive public-policy recommendations for mitigating and adapting to climate change through resilient design.

Composed of 11 experts from across various disciplines, the panel will make recommendations that will ultimately save lives and affordably protect cities from future natural disasters. ASLA urges responsible policy makers to look to innovative urban design as they make infrastructure investments to make communities more resilient and better equipped to recover from disruptive climate events.

“ASLA has identified climate change as a key issue for its members, and for society at large,” said Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, executive vice president and CEO of ASLA. “The recent devastating and real impacts of natural disasters such as hurricanes Harvey and Irma highlight the need for policy makers, both state and local, to invest in thoughtful and climate-resilient solutions to systemic infrastructure issues.”

ASLA has long advocated for sustainable landscape architecture at the intersection of design and smart policy, working with legislators and stakeholders on effective solutions that minimize the effects of climate change. Transportation and land planning that incorporates green infrastructure can provide critical services for communities, protecting them against flooding and excessive heat, and helping to improve air and water quality.

“We’ve reached a turning point in our history with regards to climate change, and the effects are undeniable at this stage,” said Dr. Jalonne White-Newsome, senior program officer with The Kresge Foundation’s environment program and a member of the blue ribbon panel. “We must take the appropriate measures and create low-carbon, sustainable and resilient communities. This includes adapting our landscapes to changing climate conditions so we are best positioned to handle the anticipated consequences while ensuring that equity and the concerns of our most vulnerable communities are at the forefront of our planning.”

The experts of the ASLA Blue Ribbon Panel will gather for a two-day meeting starting on Thursday, September 21, through Friday, September 22, 2017. The panel will publicly present its findings and policy recommendations in the form of a report in January 2018.

The members of the panel include:

  • Vaughn Rinner, FASLA, ASLA President, Chair
  • Armando Carbonell, FAICP, FAcSS, Hon MRTPI, Senior Fellow and Chair, Department of Planning and Urban Form, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
  • Mark Dawson, FASLA, Managing Principal, Sasaki Associates Inc.
  • Tim Duggan, ASLA, RLA, Founder, Phronesis
  • Ying-yu Hung, ASLA, Managing Principal, Principal, SWA, Los Angeles Studio
  • Dr. Dwane Jones, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Sustainable Development + Resilience at the University of the District of Columbia
  • Diane Jones Allen, ASLA, Program Director for Landscape Architecture, the College of Architecture Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Arlington
  • Adam Ortiz, Director for the Department of the Environment for Prince George’s County, Maryland
  • Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, Hon. AIA, SITES AP, Executive Vice President and CEO, ASLA
  • Laurinda Spear, FAIA, RLA, ASLA, LEED AP, IIDA, Principal-In-Charge, ArquitectonicaGeo
  • Dr. Jalonne L. White-Newsome, Senior Program Officer, Environment, The Kresge Foundation

Learn more.

A Joint Call to Action to Promote Healthy Communities

ASLA 2015 Professional General Design Honor Award. Mill River Park and Greenway. OLIN / Olivier Kpognon

Where we live, work and play can directly impact our physical and mental health. To more aggressively combat negative health factors such as obesity, diabetes, asthma, and anxiety, leaders of the nation’s built environment and public health organizations today pledged their support to promote greater collaboration to advance healthier, more walkable communities.

The “Joint Call to Action to Promote Healthy Communities,” brings together 450,000 professionals who recognize that the built environment — the way a community is designed and built from its buildings and public spaces to how we travel between communities — is a key determinant of health. Working together will create new momentum towards the common objective of creating and sustaining healthy buildings and spaces.

Providing options for how residents want to move around as well as encouraging physical activity can be achieved through a variety of ways. Solutions may include multi-use pathways for walking and biking, Complete Streets policies, equitable and affordable transportation and transit-oriented communities, implementation of green infrastructure, more efficient land, water and resource use, expanded tree canopies, and access to buildings with health-promoting indoor environments.

Improving community health also has a direct economic benefit. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report 86 percent of health care spending in 2010 was for people with one or more chronic medical conditions.

“Public health is at the very heart of the landscape architecture profession,” said Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, executive vice president and CEO of the American Society of Landscape Architects. “ASLA salutes this collaborative call to action and has committed to working with our partners to inspire positive change in the design of the built environment that can yield greater health benefits.”

The “Joint Call to Action to Promote Healthy Communities” specifically addresses four key points:

  • Creating and fostering partnerships that advance health;
  • Building an understanding of health data and establishing measurable health objectives for plans and projects;
  • Advancing policies, programs, and systems that promote community health, well-being and equity; and
  • Communicating the importance of health.

Read the full Joint Call to Action.

Organizations supporting today’s call to action include:

  • American Institute of Architects
  • American Planning Association
  • American Public Health Association
  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • American Society of Landscape Architects
  • National Recreation and Park Association
  • U.S. Green Building Council
  • Urban Land Institute

ASLA Announces 2016 Professional Awards

ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Award of Excellence. Underpass Park /
ASLA 2016 Professional General Design Award of Excellence. Underpass Park by PFS Studio / Tom Arban

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is excited to announce its 30 professional award recipients for 2016. Selected from 456 entries, the awards honor top public, commercial, residential, institutional, planning, communications and research projects in the U.S. and around the world. The winners will receive their awards at the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in New Orleans on Monday, October 24 at the New Orleans Ernest M. Morial Convention Center.

The September issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM) features the winning projects and is available for free viewing.

The following is a complete list of 2016 professional award winners:

General Design Category

Award of Excellence (see image above)
Underpass Park, Toronto, Ontario
by PFS Studio for Waterfront Toronto

Honor Awards
Framing Terrain and Water: Quzhou Luming Park, Quzhou City, Zhejiang Province, China
by Turenscape for the Quzhou City Government

Bishan-Ang Mo Kio Park, Bishan, Singapore
by Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl for the Public Utilities Board / National Parks Board, Singapore

Converging Ecologies as a Gateway to Acadiana, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana
by CARBO Landscape Architecture for St. Landry Parish Tourist Commission

The Metro-Forest Project, Bangkok, Thailand
by Landscape Architects of Bangkok (LAB) for PTT Public Company Limited

The Power Station, Dallas
by Hocker Design Group for The Pinnell Foundation

Corktown Common: Flood Protection and a Neighbourhood Park, Toronto, Ontario
by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates Inc. for Waterfront Toronto in Partnership with Toronto Region Conservancy Authority (TRCA) and Infrastructure Ontario (IO)

Grand Teton National Park Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center, Moose, Wyoming
by Swift Company LLC for the National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park Foundation and Grand Teton Association

Eco-Corridor Resurrects Former Brownfield, Ningbo, China
by SWA for Ningbo Planning Bureau – East New Town Development Committee

Analysis and Planning Category

ASLA 2016 Professional Analysis and Planning Honor Award. The Copenhagen Cloudburst Formula: A Strategic Process for Planning and Designing Blue-Green Interventions. Ramboll and Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Ramboll and Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl
ASLA 2016 Professional Analysis and Planning Honor Award. The Copenhagen Cloudburst Formula: A Strategic Process for Planning and Designing Blue-Green Interventions. Ramboll and Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl / Ramboll and Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl


Award of Excellence

The Copenhagen Cloudburst Formula: A Strategic Process for Planning and Designing Blue-Green Interventions, Copenhagen, Denmark
by Ramboll and Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl for the Municipality of Copenhagen

Honor Awards
Central Puget Sound Regional Open Space Strategy, Puget Sound Region, Washington
by University of Washington Green Futures Lab for The Bullitt Foundation and The Russell Family Foundation

Rebuild by Design, The Big U, Manhattan, New York
by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners for the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, Rebuild by Design

Memorial Park Master Plan 2015, Houston
by Nelson Byrd Woltz for the Houston Parks and Recreation Department, The Memorial Park Conservancy, and Uptown Houston

Baton Rouge Lakes: Restoring a Louisiana Landmark from Ecological Collapse to Cultural Sanctuary, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
by SWA Group for the Baton Rouge Area Foundation

Bayou Greenways: Realizing the Vision, Houston
by SWA Group for the Houston Parks Board

Communications Category

ASLA 2016 Professional Communications Award of Excellence. What's Out There Guides / The Cultural Landscape Foundation
ASLA 2016 Professional Communications Award of Excellence. What’s Out There Guides / The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Award of Excellence
What’s Out There Guidebooks
by The Cultural Landscape Foundation

Honor Awards
Roving Rangers: Bringing the Parks to the People
by BASE Landscape Architecture, for the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and the Santa Monica Mountains Fund

Activating Land Stewardship and Participation in Detroit: A Field Guide to Working with Lots
by Detroit Future City, published by Inland Press

Landscape Architecture Documentation Standards: Principles, Guidelines and Best Practices
by Design Workshop, published by John Wiley & Sons

PHYTO: Principles and Resources for Site Remediation and Landscape Design
by Kate Kennen, ASLA, and Niall Kirkwood, FASLA, published by Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group

DredgeFest Event Series
by The Dredge Research Collaborative

Sea Change: Boston
by Sasaki Associates Inc.

Research Category

Honor Awards
Weather-Smithing: Assessing the Role of Vegetation, Soil and Adaptive Management in Urban Green Infrastructure Performance
by Andropogon Associates Ltd. for the University of Pennsylvania

Residential Design Category

ASLA 2016 Landmark Award. Michigan Avenue /
ASLA 2016 Professional Residential Design Honor Award. DBX Ranch by Design Workshop / D.A. Horchner / Design Workshop, Inc

Award of Excellence
DBX Ranch: A Transformation Brings Forth a New Livable Landscape, Pitkin County, Colorado
by Design Workshop Inc.

Honor Awards
Kronish House, Beverly Hills, California
by Marmol Radziner

The Restoring of a Montane Landscape, Rocky Mountains, Colorado
by Design Workshop Inc.

Chilmark: Embracing a Glacial Moraine, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts
by Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects

The Rivermark, Sacramento, California
by Fletcher Studio for Bridge Housing Corporation

Water Calculation and Poetic Interpretation, Carmel, California
by Arterra Landscape Architects

ASLA 2016 Landmark Award. Michigan Avenue Streetscape /
ASLA 2016 Landmark Award. Michigan Avenue Streetscape by Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects for the City of Chicago / Steven Gierke

The Landmark Award
Michigan Avenue Streetscape: 20 Years of Magnificent Mile Blooms, Chicago
by Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects for the City of Chicago/Michigan Avenue Streetscape Association

The professional awards jury included:

  • Kona Gray, ASLA, Chair, EDSA, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
  • Keith Bowers, FASLA, Biohabitats Inc. Baltimore
  • Jennifer Guthrie, FASLA, Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, Seattle
  • Mami Hara, ASLA, Philadelphia Water Department, Philadelphia
  • Christopher Hume, Architecture Critic, Toronto Star, Toronto, Ontario
  • Lee-Anne Milburn, FASLA, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California
  • Willett Moss, ASLA, CMG Landscape Architecture, San Francisco
  • Suman Sorg, FAIA, DLR Group | Sorg, Washington, D.C.
  • Laurinda Spear, ASLA, ArquitectonicaGEO, Miami

ASLA Announces 2016 Student Awards

ASLA 2016 Student Residential Design Award of Excellence / Residential Gardens as a Health Strategy in Impoverished Communities in Developing Countries: A Case Study in Iquitos, Peru / Jorge Alarcon, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Washington
ASLA 2016 Student Residential Design Award of Excellence / Residential Gardens as a Health Strategy in Impoverished Communities in Developing Countries: A Case Study in Iquitos, Peru / Jorge Alarcon, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Washington

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is excited to announce its 22 student award recipients for 2016. Selected from 271 entries representing 71 schools, the awards honor the top work of landscape architecture students in the U.S. and around the world. The winners will receive their awards at the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in New Orleans on Monday, October 24 at the New Orleans Ernest M. Morial Convention Center.

The September issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM) features the winning projects and is available for free viewing.

The following is a complete list of the 2016 student award winners:

General Design Category

Honor Awards
Bendway Park
by Eric Arneson, Student Affiliate ASLA, an undergraduate student at the Academy of Art University

FOGFEST – California Fog Collection Festival in Highway 1
by Pablo Alfaro, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley

The Digital & The Wild: Mitigating Wildfire Risk Through Landscape Adaptations
by Jordan Duke, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Toronto

Urban Ecological Melody
by CC (Qinhe) Qian, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the Rhode Island School of Design

Residential Design Category

Award of Excellence (see image above)
Residential Gardens as a Health Strategy in Impoverished Communities in Developing Countries: A Case Study in Iquitos, Peru
by Jorge Alarcon, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Washington

Analysis and Planning Category

ASLA 2016 Student Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Amphibious Culture: Harmonizing Between Life and Seasonally Flooded Forest / Panithan Kasinphila, Student Affiliate ASLA, an undergraduate student at Chulalongkorn University
ASLA 2016 Student Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Amphibious Culture: Harmonizing Between Life and Seasonally Flooded Forest / Panithan Kasinphila, Student Affiliate ASLA, an undergraduate student at Chulalongkorn University

Award of Excellence
Amphibious Culture: Harmonizing Between Life and Seasonally Flooded Forest
by Panithan Kasinphila, Student Affiliate ASLA, an undergraduate student at Chulalongkorn University

Honor Awards

Creating Sustainable Future of Mae Kha Canal in Chiang Mai, Thailand
by Sunantana Nuanla-or, Student ASLA, a graduate student at Louisiana State University

From Gold to Pearl: A Framework of Eco-friendly Industry Catalyzing River Revitalization
by a graduate student team at Sichuan Agricultural University

Harnessing the Beating Heart: Living Systems Infrastructure on Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia
by William Baumgardner, Student ASLA, an undergraduate student at Louisiana State University

The Vermilion Corridor: Rediscovering the Waterways of Southern Louisiana
by Alexander Morvant, Associate ASLA, an undergraduate student at Louisiana State University

PHYTO-Industry: Reinvigorating the North Vancouver Waterfront Through a Phased Remediation Process
by Shan Yang, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Toronto

Sifting the Landscape: Transforming Vacant Lands through Smart Decline
by Yuxian Li, Student ASLA, a graduate student at Texas A&M University

Communications Category

Honor Awards
Porous Public Space: People + Rainwater + Cities
by a graduate student team at the University of Washington

South Dakota Transect: 44 Degrees North
by an undergraduate student team at South Dakota State University

Ground Up Journal Issue 5: Delineations
by a graduate student team at the University of California, Berkeley

Dan Kiley Landscapes in Bartholomew County, Indiana and Planting Typologies at the Miller Garden and North Christian Church
by Zhen Tong, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the Pennsylvania State University

Research Category

ASLA 2016 Student Research Award of Excellence. Feasibility Study of the Integration of Epiphytes in Designed Landscapes / Brandon Cornejo, Student ASLA, an undergraduate student at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
ASLA 2016 Student Research Award of Excellence. Feasibility Study of the Integration of Epiphytes in Designed Landscapes / Brandon Cornejo, Student ASLA, an undergraduate student at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


Award of Excellence    

Feasibility Study of the Integration of Epiphytes in Designed Landscapes
by Brandon Cornejo, Student ASLA, an undergraduate student at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Honor Award
Flowers in Crannied Walls: An Elementary Schoolyard Redesign
by Taylor Metz, Student ASLA, a graduate student at Ball State University

Student Collaboration Category

Honor Awards
Bridging Disciplines/Cultivating Health: Using a Collaborative International Community Design/Build Model to Facilitate Mental Health Treatment
by a graduate and undergraduate student team at the University of Washington

Seeding Sideyards
by a graduate student team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Community Service Category

Honor Awards
GrowingChange Prison Flip: Reclaiming an Abandoned Prison Site
by a graduate and undergraduate team from North Carolina State University

Neighborhood Detox: Enhancing Resilience in a Hazard Vulnerable Area
by Yangdi Wang, Student ASLA, a graduate student at Texas A&M University

The student awards jury included:

  • Laura Solano, ASLA, Chair, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Ned Crankshaw, ASLA, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
  • Terrence DeWan, FASLA, Terrence J. DeWan & Associates, Yarmouth, Main
  • Janelle Johnson, ASLA, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, Chicago
  • Jeffrey Lee, FASLA, Lee and Associates Inc., Washington, D.C.
  • Elizabeth Miller, FASLA, National Capital Planning Commission, Washington, D.C.
  • Forster Ndubisi, FASLA, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
  • Trinity Simons, Mayor’s Institute on City Design, Washington, D.C.
  • Barbara Swift, FASLA, Swift & Company Landscape Architects, Seattle

Pokémon Go Adds a New Layer to Public Spaces

Pershing Square Park as depicted in Pokémon Go
Pershing Square Park as depicted in Pokémon Go

According to the National Academy of Sciences, “nature-based recreation” has decreased 25 percent in the last 40 years. The average American now spends only one half of a day per week outdoors. Furthermore, kids now spend an average of only 30 minutes or less outdoors each day, half as much as 20 years ago. Is Pokémon Go — the explosively popular game app released worldwide this month — a way to get adults and kids off their sofas and into parks and other public spaces?

After a couple of days happily playing the game, my answer is a qualified yes. The qualification: it is possible to play a circumscribed version of the game while sitting at your desk or sofa. But the game is really designed to get you out into streets, parks, and plazas. It got me out into two public places — the town square in downtown Rockville, Maryland, and Pershing Square Park in Washington, D.C. — where I had different yet intriguing experiences.

Pokémon Go, which may be downloaded on iOS and Android devices, is a free, location-based augmented reality game in which players capture adorable-looking creatures called Pokémon. The game is played not from a comfy sofa, but out in the real world.

The app provides a map of the player’s real-world surroundings. Players move outside in order to find Pokémon and capture them using Poké-balls. The map provides a handy way to locate Poké-stops, which are found in such public spaces as public art installations, historical markers, and monuments and contain additional Poké-balls and other items. Poké-gyms, where players unleash their Pokémon to fight, are also located near prominent local businesses and other attractions.

I spent my first afternoon playing the game at Rockville Town Square, a 12-acre suburban public plaza that opened in 2007, part of a larger master plan to create a “daytime, evening and weekend activity center that is easily identifiable, pedestrian-oriented and incorporates a mix of uses and activities.” Not only is it home to shops and restaurants, the square also includes a number of Poké-stops. The large crowd who congregated there on a Sunday afternoon included many Pokémon Go players, smartphones in hand, searching for virtual goodies hidden in the colorful public art.

Rockville Town Square via Better Cities & Towns / Dan Cunningham
Rockville Town Square via Better Cities & Towns / Dan Cunningham

The game turned into a communal experience as we chatted with strangers along the wide sidewalks. We all certainly benefited from Rockville’s cohesive pedestrian policies and were able to crisscross the square and surrounding streets safely with little interference from traffic. While it may be facile to urge landscape architects to create Pokémon-friendly landscapes, they should continue to design high-quality and lasting public spaces that accommodate ever-evolving recreation preferences and pedestrian safety.

A couple of days later, I felt the urge to play the game at D.C.’s Pershing Square Park, a multi-level park designed by M. Paul Friedberg + Partners that opened in 1981. It features a monument to General John J. Pershing as well as a bronze sculpture of an eagle by Lorenzo Ghiglieri — both, unsurprisingly, are Poké-stops. I spent half an hour in the park on a Thursday afternoon and quickly gathered items from the statues (this is done on the app by spinning a photo of the public art or feature).

Pokémon in Pershing Park, Washington, D.C.
Pokémon in Pershing Park, Washington, D.C.

After capturing these Pokémon, I found myself with nothing to do. The park was seemingly devoid of Pokémon, no matter where I stood, so I gave up and sat down to enjoy the calm retreat from the noisy traffic streaming on all sides. Tree branches shook in the breeze, and a parade of Falun Dafa supporters marched by. One woman paused in front of the Pershing monument, not to admire its historical significance, but to retrieve items for the game. Once she finished, she quickly walked away.

Later, a family of tourists arrived with cameras. They stood in front of the monument and photographed it and each other as they spoke in their native language. Clearly they were savoring a moment to be remembered later — a traditional experience of a public space that still serves a time-honored purpose.

My experiences with Pokémon Go, and observations of other players, show that the game may not fit the traditional definition of outdoor recreation, but it certainly creates enthusiasm for exploring your environment and engaging in physical exercise.

And perhaps this new enthusiasm for augmented reality games can be tapped to generate more creative designs of public spaces that integrate real and game worlds. Similar games are sure to come in the future.

34 Top Landscape Architecture Projects Win 2015 ASLA Professional Awards

long-dock-the-dirt
ASLA 2015 Professional General Design Award of Excellence. At the Hudson’s Edge: Beacon’s Long Dock a Resilient Riverfront Park. Reed Hilderbrand / James Ewing Photography

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is excited to announce its 34 professional award recipients. Selected from 459 entries, the 2015 ASLA Professional Awards honor top public, commercial, residential, institutional, planning, communications and research projects in the U.S. and around the world. The winners will receive their awards at the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Chicago on Monday, November 9 at McCormick Place – Lakeside Center, Arie Crown Theater.

The October issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM) features the winning projects and is available online for free viewing.

Here is a complete list of 2015 professional award winners:

General Design Category

Award of Excellence
At the Hudson’s Edge: Beacon’s Long Dock as a Resilient Riverfront Park, Beacon, N.Y.
by Reed Hilderbrand LLC for the Scenic Hudson Land Trust (see image above)

Honor Awards
Perez Art Museum Miami: Resiliency by Design, Miami
by ArquitectonicaGEO for the Perez Art Museum Miami

Mill River Park and Greenway, Stamford, Conn.
by OLIN for the Mill River Collaborative

Art and Infrastructure: Community, Culture, and a Collection in the Berkshires, Williamstown, Mass.
by Reed Hilderbrand LLC for the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

Weishan Wetland Park, Weishan, Shandong Province, China
by AECOM, Shanghai for the Wei Shan Investment Co. Ltd.

Phil Hardberger Park, San Antonio, Texas
by Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects for the San Antonio Department of Parks and Recreation

IBM Honolulu Plaza, Honolulu
by Surfacedesign Inc. for Victoria Ward Ltd., Subsidiary of Howard Hughes Corporation

The Lawn on D, Boston
by Sasaki Associates Inc. for the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority (MCCA)

Public Media Commons, St. Louis
by DLANDstudio Architecture + Landscape Architecture PLLC for the St. Louis Regional Public Media Inc. let by KETC Nine Network, Public Television

Analysis & Planning Category

ASLA 2015 Professional Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Penn’s Landing Redevelopment Feasibility Study. Hargreaves Associates / Hargreaves Associates
ASLA 2015 Professional Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Penn’s Landing Redevelopment Feasibility Study. Hargreaves Associates / Hargreaves Associates


Award of Excellence

Penn’s Landing Redevelopment and Feasibility Study, Philadelphia
by Hargreaves Associates for the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation

Honor Awards
Cornwall Park 100 Year Master Plan – Projecting a Resilient Future, Auckland, New Zealand
by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, Charlottesville, Va., and New York, N.Y., for Cornwall Park Trust Board

A Landscape Legacy – Master Planning a Cultural Landscape for Future Generations at Overlook Farm, Dalton, Pa.
by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, Charlottesville, Va., and New York, N.Y., for Mort and Sue Fuller

Fayetteville 2030: Food City Scenario, Fayetteville, Ark.
by University of Arkansas Community Design Center for the City of Fayetteville

Dallas Connected Cities, Dallas
by Mia Lehrer + Associates (MLA) for the City of Dallas

James Island, Columbia, Canada
by Design Workshop, Aspen

Communications Category

ASLA 2015 Professional Communications Award of Excellence. Landscape Performance Series: Demonstrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Value of Sustainable Landscapes. Landscape Architecture Foundation / Landscape Architecture Foundation
ASLA 2015 Professional Communications Award of Excellence. Landscape Performance Series: Demonstrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Value of Sustainable Landscapes. Landscape Architecture Foundation / Landscape Architecture Foundation


Award of Excellence

Landscape Performance Series: Demonstrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Value of Sustainable Landscapes
by the Landscape Architecture Foundation

Honor Awards
Composite Landscapes: Photomontage and Landscape Architecture
by Charles Waldheim, Affiliate ASLA, published by the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Landscape Architecture Frontiers, Beijing
by Peking University, College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, published by Higher Education Press

Ecological Restoration Journal: A New Platform for Dialogue Between Landscape Architects and Ecologists
by Rutgers University, published by the University of Wisconsin Press

Modern Landscapes: Transition & Transformation Book Series
by the Cultural Landscape Foundation, published by Princeton Architectural Press

Research Category

Honor Awards
Collective Visions: Exploring the Design Potential of Landscape History
by Kathleen John-Alder, ASLA / Rutgers University

Below the Surface: Evaluating Urban Soil Performance Over Time
by Reed Hilderbrand LLC / Halvorson Design Partnership

Restoration in Urban Parks: Long-term Tests of Forest Management to Advance Landscape Structure and Function
by Rutgers University

Spontaneous Urban Plants
by Future Green Studio

Case Study Investigation (CSI): Measuring Environmental, Social, and Economic Impacts of Exemplary Landscapes
by the Landscape Architecture Foundation

Residential Design Category

cedar-creek
ASLA 2015 Residential Design Award of Excellence. Cedar Creek. Hocker Design Group / Hocker Design Group, Robert Yu, Justin Clemons


Award of Excellence

Cedar Creek, Trinidad, Texas
by Hocker Design Group

Honor Awards
300 Ivy, San Francisco
by Fletcher Studio for Pocket Development

MassArt Residence Hall, Boston
by Ground Inc. for the Massachusetts College of Art and Design / Massachusetts State College Building Authority

Sweetwater Spectrum Residential Community for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sonoma, Calif.
by Roche + Roche Landscape Architecture for Sweetwater Spectrum

Metamorphous – A Corten Seawall Sculpture & Foreshore Enhancement, Vancouver, BC, Canada
by Paul Sangha Landscape Architecture

Mill Creek Ranch, Vanderpool, Texas
by Ten Eyck Landscape Architects

Flying Point Residence, Southhampton, N.Y.
by Edmund Hollander Landscape Architects

Brooklyn Oasis, Brooklyn, N.Y.
by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates Inc.

The Landmark Award

ASLA 2015 Professional Awards. The Landmark Award. The Art Institute of Chicago South Garden by Dan Kiley / Charles Birnbaum, FASLA
ASLA 2015 Professional Awards. The Landmark Award. The Art Institute of Chicago South Garden by Dan Kiley / Charles Birnbaum, FASLA

The Art Institute of Chicago South Garden by Dan Kiley, Nominated by the Cultural Landscape Foundation

The professional awards jury included:

•    Keith LeBlanc, FASLA, Keith LeBlanc Landscape Architecture Inc., Boston, Jury Chair
•    Thomas Balsley, FASLA, Thomas Balsley Associates, New York City
•    René Bihan, ASLA, SWA Group, San Francisco
•    Alan Brake, The Architect’s Newspaper LLC, New York City
•    Kathleen Dickhut, ASLA, Department of Housing and Economic Development, Chicago
•    Signe Nielsen, FASLA, Mathews Nielsen, New York City
•    Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, FASLA, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, Vancouver, BC, Canada
•    Mark Robbins, American Academy in Rome, Rome, Italy
•    Richard Weller, ASLA, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Explore all the award-winning projects.

23 Landscape Architecture Student Projects Win 2015 ASLA Student Awards

student-general
ASLA 2015 Student General Design Award of Excellence. Imagine the Barracks of Pion: Developing the edge of the Park of Versailles. Zheming (Taro) Cai, Student ASLA, Harvard Graduate School of Design / Zheming (Taro) Cai, Student ASLA

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is excited to announce its 23 student award recipients. Selected from 327 entries representing 84 schools, the 2015 ASLA Student Awards honor the top work of landscape architecture students in the U.S. and around the world. The winners will receive their awards at the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in Chicago on Monday, November 9 at McCormick Place – Lakeside Center, Arie Crown Theater.

The October issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine (LAM) features the winning projects and is available online for free viewing.

Here is a complete list of the 2015 student award winners:

General Design Category

Award of Excellence
Imagine the Barracks of Pion: Developing the Edge of the Park of Versailles
by Zheming Cai, Associate ASLA, a graduate student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (see image above)

Honor Awards
Walk into the Sea
by Zhi Wang, Associate ASLA, a graduate student at the Rhode Island School of Design

Deconstructing Hydrologies: Reviving the Memory of Water in Dumbarton Oaks Park
by Elizabeth Anderson, Associate ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Washington

Borderless Landscapes of Control
by Rui Felix, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Toronto

For the Rest
by Maria Landoni De Rose, Associate ASLA, an undergraduate student at the University of California, Berkeley

Residential Design Category

Honor Awards
Within the Frame: The Countryside as a City
by a graduate student team from the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Valley Families: Between Fog and Flood
by a graduate student team from the University of Pennsylvania

Analysis and Planning Category

ASLA 2015 Student Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Rethinking Taj Heritage Corridor: A River as Historic Connection. Peichin Hao, Student ASLA, Harvard Graduate School of Design / Peichin Hao, Student ASLA
ASLA 2015 Student Analysis and Planning Award of Excellence. Rethinking Taj Heritage Corridor: A River as Historic Connection. Peichin Hao, Student ASLA, Harvard Graduate School of Design / Peichin Hao, Student ASLA


Award of Excellence

Rethinking Taj Heritage Corridor: A River as Historic Connection
by Peichen Hao, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Honor Awards
Confronting the Present: Towards a Civic Realm on Beirut’s Urban Fringe
by Logan Littlefield, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Toronto

Airborne
by a graduate student team from the Harvard Graduate School of Design

After Steel – Toward an Industrial Evolution
by Robert McIntosh, Student ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Toronto

Fallow Ground | Future City
by a graduate student team from the University of Virginia

Productive Conservation: Utilizing Landscape Ecology and Precision Agriculture Towards Land-Water Conservation
by a graduate student team from the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Communications Category

ASLA 2015 Student Communications Award of Excellence. Landscapes of Longevity. Asa Eslocker, Assoc. ASLA; Harriett Jameson, Assoc. ASLA. University of Virginia / Asa Eslocker
ASLA 2015 Student Communications Award of Excellence. Landscapes of Longevity. Asa Eslocker, Assoc. ASLA; Harriett Jameson, Assoc. ASLA. University of Virginia / Asa Eslocker


Award of Excellence

Landscapes of Longevity
by a graduate student team from the University of Virginia

Honor Award
PLOT: A Student-edited Journal of Landscape Architecture
by a graduate student team from the City College of New York

Research Category

Honor Awards
Counterordinance: a Manifesto on Maintenance
by Cali Pfaff, Associate ASLA, a graduate student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Grounding Root System Architecture
by Gwendolyn McGinn, Associate ASLA, a graduate student at the University of Virginia

Student Collaboration Category

Honor Awards
Reverse Engineering: Reconfiguring the Creek-Campus Interface
by a graduate student team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Fire Circle and Stargazing Platform at Goose Island State Park
by a graduate student team from the University of Texas at Austin

Community Service Category

ASLA 2015 Student Collaboration Award of Excellence. Landscapes of Justice: Redefining the Prison Environment. Students at Iowa State University / Julie Stevens, ASLA
ASLA 2015 Student Collaboration Award of Excellence. Landscapes of Justice: Redefining the Prison Environment. Students at Iowa State University / Julie Stevens, ASLA


Award of Excellence

Landscapes of Justice: Redefining the Prison Environment
by an undergraduate student team from Iowa State University

Honor Awards
Ghana International Design Studio: Playtime in Africa
by a graduate student team from North Carolina State University

Starkville Public Library ‘Read’ Garden
by Travis Crabtree, Student ASLA, an undergraduate student from Mississippi State University

Kintsugi Garden: The Meaning of Mending
by an undergraduate student team from the University of Washington

The student awards jury included:

•    Kona Gray, ASLA, EDSA, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Jury Chair
•    Richard Bumstead, ASLA, University of Chicago, Chicago
•    Maurice Cox, Affiliate ASLA, Detroit Department of Planning and Development
•    Katya Crawford,  ASLA, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico
•    Lisa Gimmy, ASLA, Lisa Gimmy Landscape Architecture, Los Angeles
•    David Hill, ASLA, D.I.R.T. Studio, Auburn, Alabama
•    Fernando Magallanes, ASLA, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
•    Katherine Orff, ASLA, Scape / Landscape Architecture PLLC, New York City
•    Laura Solano, ASLA, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts

Explore all the award-winning projects.

Women Earn Less than Men in Architecture and Engineering Professions

patricia arquette
Patricia Arquette / E! Online

Actress Patricia Arquette spoke passionately about closing the gender pay gap during her acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actress during the Academy Awards on Sunday night. An uneven playing field exists in a number of professions, including the architecture and engineering occupations—women in these fields earn 82 percent of what men make, according to the U.S. Department of Labor’s 2014 averages, which are based on median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers.

The Wall Street Journal used the 2014 data to show that in only two professions do women match or exceed men’s weekly earnings—health practitioner support technologists and technicians (100 percent) and stock clerks and order fillers (102 percent). A gap exists in every other occupation. Among full-time workers, women earn 82.5 percent of male salaries. Women working in construction earn 91.3 percent of male salaries; women in legal professions earn 56.7 percent, the biggest gap.

Discrimination plays a role in the gender wage gap, according to the National Women’s Law Center. The center cites a 2007 study by labor economists Francine Blau and Lawrence Kahn, which showed that 41 percent of the wage gap remains unexplained even after examining the effects of occupation, industry, work experience, union status, race, and educational attainment. This indicates that discrimination plays a sizable role in the gap.

The 2012 median pay for landscape architects was $64,180, slightly less than the $66,380 earned by architects, surveyors, and cartographers, says the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. No information about possible salary differences between male and female landscape architects was provided by the bureau.

For Philadelphia and Baltimore, Parks Are Central to Livability

dogpark
Schuylkill River Dog Park / FSRP.org

“Many people think parks are easy, but parks are one of the hardest things for governments to do because of the physical and human aspects,” explained Peter Harnik, Hon. ASLA, director of The Trust for Public Land’s Center for City Park Excellence, while introducing a panel of experts at the New Partners for Smart Growth conference in Baltimore. The complex undertaking of how to best to create and maintain parks — for both governments and non-profits — is a thread that connected all speakers.

Mark A. Focht, FASLA, first deputy commissioner of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation and former president of ASLA, gave an overview of the amazing progress made in Philadelphia’s expansive park system over the past few years. Some 80 percent of the city’s residents are already meeting Mayor Michael Nutter’s “goal of everyone being within a ten-minute walk away from a park.” Examples of recently built green spaces and amenities that help the parks department to reach all city residents include Paine’s Park, a skate park and public space; the Schuylkill River Dog Park; and the Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk.

As part of Philadelphia’s innovative, 25-year Green City Clean Waters plan, the parks department has also “made strategic investments to stabilize, improve, and green existing recreation centers and playgrounds.” It also is implementing green infrastructure for innovative stormwater management in existing neighborhood parks and bringing “high-quality amenities” like trail systems to communities.

Baltimore residents Stephanie Murdock and Jennifer Robinson described how non-profits — not the city government — are leading a resurgence in Baltimore’s parks, helping to make the city more livable. Murdock, the president of Skatepark of Baltimore, talked about her non-profit’s ten-year journey to build a public, concrete, destination skatepark in Baltimore. The first phase – a 5,000 square-feet concrete bowl — was completed last May in Roosevelt Park, a late-nineteenth century park in the Hampden neighborhood.

skatepark
Skatepark of Baltimore / Explore Baltimore County

“For a young person in Baltimore to have a place where they can be free, that’s huge,” said Murdock. She told the audience the skatepark will soon add more “shade, seating, walkways, and restrooms” so that all members of the community can enjoy the space.

Robinson, the director of Friends of Patterson Park, another park in southeast Baltimore, said her non-profit’s efforts showed her that “parks become very personal for the people who use them.” Her non-profit is transforming the once-neglected Patterson Park, an Olmsted-designed space, into the city’s “best backyard.”

patterson2
Patterson Park / Patterson Park

The group’s involvement began with the renovation of the park’s historic pagoda, which had fallen into disrepair. Today, the group ensures the park remains “a green space for all sorts of users” through community events and programs. The group is now “looking at a formal conservancy model that will elevate the friends’ role in management of the park.”

Green Infrastructure Helps Communities Become “Climate Smart”

At the New Partners for Smart Growth conference in Baltimore, a panel of experts called for using green infrastructure to make communities “climate smart,” which can also boost their resilience to natural disasters.

According to Breece Robertson, the Trust for Public Land’s geographic information systems (GIS) director, climate-smart cities use green infrastructure in four ways (see a brief video above). They create “safe, interconnected opportunities to walk or bike; cool down the city by planting trees and creating parks; absorb stormwater to save energy and recharge aquifers; and protect cities through green shorelines.”

In a pilot study with New York City government, Columbia University, and Drexel University on how to use green infrastructure to protect New York City’s waterfront, the team created a GIS data tool to model priorities. According to Robertson, the models found that “green buffers really do improve resilience.”

Pete Wiley, an economist with the NOAA’s office for coastal management, spoke about a post-Hurricane Sandy assessment of the restoration of living shorelines in New York and New Jersey. According to Wiley, one of the challenges is communities and policymakers “think about restoring what was” because they only regard a “narrow range of benefits based on a specific issue.”

Instead, policymakers must “consider the full range of the benefits for all restoration options.” For instance, more resilient coastal designs that apply green infrastructure can provide a range of benefits, including “recreation, carbon sequestration, storm surge protection, and wildlife habitats.”

Hilarie Sorensen, an educator with Minnesota Sea Grant, described how Duluth, Minnesota is assessing how to use green infrastructure in the wake of a massive storm. Th city, which is located in the Great Lakes Basin, suffered from an estimated $100 million in damages after a catastrophic flash flood hit the region in 2012. The organization selected a 4,400-acre site called Chester Creek for an economic assessment of using a green infrastructure approach, because “it had sustained the most damage from the flood and discharged into Lake Superior.”

A cost-benefit analysis explored the use of green infrastructure to reach 76-acre-feet of water storage, with the goal of a 20 percent reduction in peak discharge for a 100-year storm event. The researchers walked through green infrastructure options and selected the “most viable” during meetings with the local NOAA team. They then worked with the local planning department to “preserve existing green spaces and wetlands.” They “calculated the square footage of roofs” and identified potential “green or blue roofs;” they also examined “tax-forfeited properties to preserve parcels of land.” The group received a $250,000 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant in 2014 to fund restoration projects that also support green infrastructure.