ASLA 2020 Conference on Landscape Architecture Call for Presentations

Miami Beach soundscape by West 8 / copyright Robin Hill

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is now accepting proposals for the 2020 Conference on Landscape Architecture in Miami, Florida, October 2 – 5, 2020.

The ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture is the largest gathering of landscape architects and allied professionals in the world—all coming together to learn, celebrate, build relationships, and strengthen the bonds of our incredibly varied professional community.

We seek education proposals that will help to drive change in the field of landscape architecture and solve everyday challenges informed by research and practice.

Help us shape the 2020 education program by submitting a proposal through our online system by Thursday, January 23, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. PT.

More than 100 education sessions and field sessions will provide attendees with the opportunity to earn professional development hours under the Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System™ (LA CES™). Many of the sessions will also qualify for continuing education credit with the Green Building Certification Institute (toward SITES AP and LEED AP credential maintenance), the American Institute of Architects, the American Institute of Certified Planners, and other allied professional organizations and state registration boards.

Education session speakers selected from this process will receive a full complimentary registration to the 2020 Conference on Landscape Architecture.

To coordinate proposals and network with potential speakers, we encourage you to use the Call for Presentations Google group.

Please visit the submission site to learn more about criteria, the review process, and key dates.

Submit your session proposal today.

This post is by Katie Riddle, ASLA, director of professional practice at ASLA.

Using Tarot Cards to Understand the Spirit of Place

Fairy Hills of Scotland / Elizabeth Boults

“The idea that big data will be the generator of design in the future is very depressing,” said Elizabeth Boults, ASLA, a landscape architect and educator, at the ASLA 2019 Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego. She instead called for “alternative methods that incorporate a more spiritual perspective.”

With her husband Chip Sullivan, FASLA, a professor of landscape architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, who is a passionate proponent for honoring and designing with the unseen forces that shape landscapes, Boults outlined how one method that sounds a bit woolly at first — tarot cards — can actually be a thoughtful design tool for understanding the genus loci (spirit of place), which is so central to landscape architecture.

Boults believes that landscape architecture is a mix of art and science. Art relates to the “mysterious, non-linear, subjective” process of design, while science is about “rational structures, categories, and typologies.”

Beyond art and science though, there is also the spiritual aspect of landscapes. “Across cultures, people shape landscapes based on their beliefs.” Many cultures have had “gods and goddesses who are guardians of the spirit of places.” For example, Romans believed each home had a genius, who were honored through a shrine.

Roman shrine to the genius of the home / Household Gods by Alexandra Sofroniew

Prehistoric peoples were attuned to the “atmosphere, the flora, animal life, and geological formations; they listened to the trees, wind, and moon.” Boults wondered: “Are we still listening today?”

Enduring ancient beliefs are still alive and well in modern practices such as Feng Shui in China, Vastu Shastra in India, and landscape cosmologies among Native people and across many cultures. Within these cultural approaches to the landscape, it’s always important to “consult the genus loci of a place before starting a design process.”

Sullivan then steered the lecture towards the use of tarot cards, which he had previously “never paid attention to.” But then one day he began to wonder, “what are they about? When we have our cards read, what are we putting our value in?”

Examining historical and contemporary decks, he discovered they are “all about the landscape,” with their “Pre-Raphaelite imagery that compresses natural information.”

Antique Italian tarot card deck / Elizabeth Boults

During a studio project with his students to define core landscape design principles, he discovered what they were creating were essentially tarot cards, depicting sacred archetypal elements like the tree of life, the enchanted forest, the well. His students then began using the tarot decks in order to actively divine new designs; the result were “amazing.”

Like conventional decks, the genus loci tarot laid out core elements such as “the journey of the hero, the call to adventure, facing trials and tribulations, finding resolution, crossing the threshold, and achieving enlightenment.” Sullivan believes people are attracted to tarot cards because they depict life as a journey.

He also believes it’s no coincidence that tarot cards and mysticism are so popular in highly creative Silicon Valley, which is home to companies like Oracle (another sacred symbol).

In the last third of what was one of the most unusual and fun ASLA conference sessions ever, Sullivan and Boults offered glue, collage materials, watercolors, pens, and index cards so that attendees could create tarot cards depicting their own conception of genus loci.

Genus loci tarot card / Edith Drcar
Genus loci tarot card / Fred Ogram
Genus loci tarot card / Jessamyn Lett

Two attendees from different parts of the room realized they drew the nearly-exact figure of a wellspring, the source of life, showing that natural archetypes remain real in our disconnected digital world.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (August 16 – 31)

Boston City Hall renovation / Sasaki
Boston City Hall renovation / Sasaki

Sasaki Is Redesigning City Hall Plaza for the MassesBoston Magazine, 8/21/19
“The design firm’s Kate Tooke and Christine Dunn talk revamping Boston City Hall Plaza.”

A Santa Monica Backyard Is Remade for Outdoor EntertainingThe Los Angeles Times, 8/22/19
“Landscape architect Joseph Marek’s clients made do with their Santa Monica backyard for six years, but eventually they decided that previous owners’ “improvements” just didn’t fit their lifestyle.”

The Hoosier Gardener: Jensen Landscape Restoration Garners Landmarks’ Award The Indianapolis Star, 8/23/19
“Indiana Landmarks recently recognized one of Indianapolis’ most hidden treasures, the Jens Jensen-designed garden at Marian University.”

Landscape Architect Uses Video Game Development Software to Rethink Digital Landscapes The Star, 8/23/19
“The digital world of video games has changed over time thanks to architects and their expertise in spatial design and designing 3D environments. Digital model building are skillsets architects use every day, so who better to help design these digital worlds?”

The New Orleans Museum of Art Flaunts Its Waterside Sculpture Garden The Architect’s Newspaper, 8/26/19
“The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, which adjoins the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), reopened this summer after a major expansion.”

Philadelphia Galleries: Penn Celebrates Landscape Architect and Beloved Professor The Philadelphia Inquirer, 8/28/19
“Ian McHarg (1920-2001), the Scottish-born landscape architect, founder of the University of Pennsylvania’s landscape architecture department, and magnetic professor there is considered the dean of ecological land-use planning.”

Six Scholarships for Emerging Women Leaders to Attend the 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture

San Diego Waterfront Park by Hargreaves Associates / iStockPhoto

A group of landscape architects raised $10,000 for scholarships that will cover the travel and hotel costs for six emerging women landscape architects to attend the 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego, which will be held November 15-18. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has covered the cost of registration for the six scholars, contributing nearly $5,000.

Thanks to the efforts of WxLA — which is led by landscape architects Cinda Gilliland, ASLA, Jamie Maslyn Larson, ASLA, Steven Spears, FASLA, Rebecca Leonard, ASLA, and Gina Ford, FASLA — and all its gracious donors, the cost of the conference for the six who win the scholarship will be completely covered.

According to the group, the purpose of the scholarship is “to aid in the professional development and success of young and emerging leaders in our profession.” Furthermore, the scholarship “intends to promote gender justice and help level the playing field for women in the profession. As such, preference will be given to female candidates, including non-binary and transgendered female candidates.”

The 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture offers more than 120 education sessions, which enables attendees to fulfill their professional development requirements, while networking with colleagues from all over the world.

The call for applications is now closed. Please contact Gina Ford to find out how to make a donation for the 2019 scholars.

WxLA requires scholarship winners to assist in the creation of a convening of women leaders across the profession, which will be done “in concert with and with the guidance of the WxLA team.”

Learn more at WxLA’s Instagram account about their Women’s Landscape Equity (re)Solution. And check out WxLA’s partner, the Vela Project, created by Samantha Solano, Associate ASLA, and TJ Marston, ASLA. They have produced a series of great infographics about gender equity in the field of landscape architecture.

ASLA leadership data / The Vela Project
ASLA Professional Awards and Honors data / The Vela Project

ASLA will acknowledge the scholarship winners at the 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego.

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (April 16 – 30)

Pier-35-3.jpg
Pier 35 on the East River waterfront / SHoP, Ken Smith Workshop

How Wildlife Bridges Over Highways Make Animals—And People—SaferNational Geographic, 4/16/19
“Bridges for bears and tunnels for tortoises have significantly reduced the number of wildlife-car collisions worldwide.”

Make America Graze AgainThe New York Times, 4/22/19
“Nashville’s Zach Richardson uses sustainable practices — and a flock of sheep — to clear overgrown landscapes.”

Design Center Unveils Land Bridge StudyNashville Post, 4/23/19
“There are many local urban place making experts and hobbyists alike who have often contended the single-greatest drawback to Nashville’s failure to maximize its most effective form and function is not limited to the city’s lack of comprehensive mass transit.”

Pier 35 Eco-Park and ‘Urban Beach’ Is Open to the Public6sqft, 4/23/19
“After years of anticipation, Pier 35 on the East River waterfront is officially open (h/t Curbed). The project, designed by SHoP with Ken Smith Workshop, consists of a new eco-park and an “urban beach” anchoring the northern flank of the East River waterfront esplanade and providing much-needed public space on the waterfront.”

Landscape Architect Pushes His Students to Serve Communities, Design For Greater Good The Daily Evergreen, 4/26/19
“Steve Austin, WSU Architecture professor and landscape architect, said he believes we need to hold open discussions on climate change.”

ASLA 2019 Communications Internship

ASLA 2018 Professional Research Honor Award. Urban Aquatic Health: Integrating New Technologies and Resilience into Floating Wetlands. Ayers Saint Gross

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) seeks a full-time summer communications intern. The intern will research and update ASLA’s sustainable design resource guides, create case studies on resilient design, and write weekly posts on landscape architecture and related topics for The Dirt blog.

Responsibilities:

• The internship is full-time Monday through Friday for 10 weeks, from June through August.
• The intern will research and update sustainable design resource guides.
• The intern will provide communications support for the Smart Policies for a Changing Climate project, including creating case studies on resilient landscape design.
• The intern will create original weekly content for The Dirt, covering projects, events, and new publications.
• The intern will also have the opportunity to attend educational and networking events at the National Building Museum, Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks, and other museums and think tanks in Washington, D.C.
• Other communications projects may come up as well.

Requirements:

• Current enrollment in a Master’s program in landscape architecture.
• Excellent writing skills. The intern must be able to write clearly for a general audience.
• Excellent photographic composition and editing skills.
• Proven research skills and ability to quickly evaluate the quality and relevance of resources.
• Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to interact graciously with busy staff members and outside experts.
• Working knowledge of Photoshop, WordPress, and Microsoft Office suite.

How to Apply:

Please send cover letter, CV, two writing samples (no more than 2 pages each) to jgreen@asla.org by end of day, Friday, March 29.

Phone interviews will be conducted with finalists the week of April 1 and selection will be made the following week.

The 10-week internship offers a $4,500 stipend. ASLA can also work with the interns to attain academic credit for the internship.

The internship is in-house located at the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture, the national headquarters, which is conveniently located in downtown Washington, D.C., one block north of the Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro Station on the Red, Yellow, and Green Lines.

ASLA Opens 2019 Professional and Student Awards Call for Entries

ASLA 2019 Professional Awards Call for Entries
ASLA 2019 Student Awards Call for Entries

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is now accepting entries for its 2019 Professional and Student Awards, the world’s most prestigious juried landscape architecture competition.

Each year, the ASLA Professional Awards honor the best in landscape architecture from around the globe, while the ASLA Student Awards give us a glimpse into the future of the profession.

Award recipients receive featured coverage in Landscape Architecture Magazine, the magazine of ASLA, and in many other design and construction industry and general interest media. ASLA will honor the award recipients, their clients, and advisors at the awards presentation ceremony during the 2019 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego, November 15-18.

The prestige of the ASLA awards programs relies on the high-caliber juries that convene each year to review submissions.

Members of the 2019 professional awards jury are:

  • Andrea Cochran, FASLA, Chair, Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture, San Francisco, CA
  • Henri Bava, Agence Ter, Paris, France
  • Kofi Boone, ASLA, North Carolina State University, Durham, NC
  • Gina Ford, FASLA, Agency Landscape and Planning, Cambridge, MA
  • Deb Guenther, FASLA, Mithun, Seattle, WA
  • John King, Honorary ASLA, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco, CA
  • Pam Linn, FASLA, Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI
  • John Vinci, Vinci Hamp Architects, Chicago, IL
  • Keith Wagner, FASLA, Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architecture, Burlington, VT

Both Stephanie A. Rolley, FASLA, Kansas State University, on behalf of the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) and Gale Newman, ASLA Texas A&M University, on behalf of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA) will join the jury for the selection of the Research Category.

Members of the 2019 student awards jury are:

  • Diane Jones Allen, ASLA, Chair, Design Jones LLC, Arlington, TX
  • Diana Fernandez, ASLA, Sasaki Associates, Upton, MA
  • David Gouverneur, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • Robert Gray, ASLA, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, Kansas City, MO
  • Damian Holmes, World Landscape Architecture, Melbourne, Australia
  • Kendra Hyson, Associate ASLA, The Neighborhood Design Center, Washington, DC
  • Maki Kawaguchi, Gehl, New York, NY
  • Signe Nielsen, FASLA, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, P.C., New York, NY
  • Daniel Tal, ASLA, Ambit3D LLC, Lakewood, CO

Both the ASLA Professional and Student awards feature five categories: General Design; Residential Design; Analysis and Planning; Communications; and Research. The Professional Awards also include The Landmark Award, while the Student Awards include the Student Community Service Award and Student Collaboration categories.

Key Deadlines:

Professional awards entry fees are due by February 15, 2019. All submissions are due by 11:59 PST on March 1, 2019.

Student awards entry fees are due by May 10, 2019. All submissions are due by 11:59 PST on May 17, 2019.

To start the entry process visit—www.asla.org/2019cfe.

In need of inspiration? View the ASLA 2018 professional and student award-winning projects.

The Professional and Student Awards are a program of the ASLA Fund.

ASLA 2019 Conference on Landscape Architecture Call for Presentations

San Diego Waterfront Park by Hargreaves Associates / iStockPhoto

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has released its call for presentations for the 2019 Conference on Landscape Architecture, which will take place November 15-18 in San Diego. More than 6,000 landscape architects and allied professionals are expected to attend.

The meeting will feature a diverse spectrum of industry experts speaking on a wide range of subjects, from sustainable design and best practices to new materials and technologies.

More than 130 education sessions and field sessions will be presented during the meeting, providing attendees with the opportunity to earn up to 21 professional development hours under the Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System™ (LA CES™).

Many of the sessions will also qualify for continuing education credit with the Green Building Certification Institute (toward LEED AP credential maintenance), the American Institute of Architects, the American Institute of Certified Planners, and other allied professional organizations and state registration boards.

Education session speakers selected from this process will receive a full complimentary registration to the ASLA 2019 Conference and may also be eligible for reimbursement for one night’s hotel stay at an official ASLA hotel (an estimated $750 value).

Landscape architecture professionals wishing to present at the San Diego conference need to be active members of ASLA. Allied professionals are encouraged to both submit presentations and speak but are not required to be members of the Society. To coordinate proposals and network with potential speakers, we encourage you to use the CFP Google Group.

The deadline for education session proposals is January 23, 2018. Submit your session proposal today.

Interview with Linda Jewell: How to See More Deeply

Linda Jewell, FASLA

Linda Jewell, FASLA, is the recipient of the 2018 ASLA Medal, the 2008 Jot D. Carpenter Teaching Medal, and the 2007 Bradford Williams Medal. Jewell is professor emerita of landscape architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, where she was chair from 2006-2010 and partner in the firm Freeman & Jewell. She was construction editor at Landscape Architecture Magazine in the 80s, and co-author of Women in Landscape Architecture: Essays on History and Practice (McFarland, 2011). She is working on a new book on outdoor event spaces.

Interview was conducted at the ASLA 2018 Annual Meeting & EXPO in Philadelphia.

How can landscape architecture educators strike a balance between teaching students about the big picture issues — climate change, urbanization, biodiversity loss — and the practical aspects of designing and building a project in the real world?

The curriculum has to strike the balance. Education should be project-based, because that is the education we’re best at and what really works for designers. Some of those projects start small and work up in scale, and then others start large and work down in scale.

I remember a project when I was teaching at North Carolina State 35 years ago. Arthur Sullivan, who had taught at the University of Pennsylvania and was a scientist, ran a wonderful studio where he asked students to analyze a suburban house, an urban house, and a rural house. He asked them to analyze every bit of water and trash — to discover these homes’ impact on the world. What would have to happen for them to achieve zero resource use? So, it was a small focus, but it looked out.

Whenever students are doing something small — like working out their water system — they’ve got to know where every drop of water ends up. They have to have a realistic view rather than just, “Oh, this is what they did in Portland, and so we’re going to do it here.”

The issue is learning to look at the specific situation and then back out and look at the impact of the small on the large. At the same time, you can look at the impact of large-planning decisions on how small projects are built.

How does landscape architecture education incorporate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) principles, which are viewed as so critical in today’s job market? How is education focused on STEM strengthened by design thinking?

It’s fascinating how in the last decade science and technology curricula have been looking to design schools for design thinking. There’s hardly a well-known engineering, computer technology, or environmental science department that isn’t in some way teaching design thinking now.

What they’re after is out of the box thinking. They are trying to help their students not only follow linear systems, which is the tradition in engineering, but to break out and bite the blue apple. I know one faculty member used to say: “Take that risk, try something that has not yet been prescribed.”

Landscape architects are deeply connected to the environmental sciences. We have been working with environmental scientists through the entire course of the profession. It has become more precise because regulatory requirements have become more complicated. There is still a lot of our population that is aware that when you build a project, it will have impact on the local bay or river, the ocean, and air quality. Because of that awareness, we have clients, particularly government agencies, that want to understand the impact of making a particular decision.

For the most part, all of the good, strong, creative design firms in the country rely on specialists — sometimes landscape architects who have also studied some aspect of ecology or someone who started in ecology and maybe studied landscape architecture or environmental planning. Nobody does anything by themselves any more; there are very complex teams.

As educators, part of what we have to do is to help people find their place. We help them understand the breadth of possibilities and the complexities. Everybody — even if they are the most technical, nerdy kind of person doing very specific things — wants to reach outside the box to solve a problem.

We must recognize each site is unique and you have to solve a situation for a particular site. I’m tired of seeing Portland green infrastructure details appearing in projects all over the country. Every time I go to see a student project somewhere everybody’s thrown in the images of Portland. There probably is a better solution someplace else. The ability to craft things to the unique situation is really important.

How does landscape architecture education need to evolve to meet the needs of increasingly diverse student body and a diverse society?

Undergraduate and graduate landscape architects need to recognize that other people, particularly those in other cultures, see the world differently than they do. People have different value systems. Just because you think it’s wonderful to have a coffee shop on the edge of your project doesn’t mean everyone does.

Now, I think most educators think, “Well, then you do community projects.” But there are other ways as well. Classmates can learn from one another.

I taught the large architecture and landscape architecture urban studies courses with 140 students at University of California at Berkeley. These young freshman are trying to figure out what they want to do in the design world. And talk about diversity — it is Berkeley, where white males are in a minority, and there’s everybody — Southeast Asians, lots of Latino students, African-American students.

They learn from one another if you set up a situation where they’re working in teams. I used to do an exercise where one student makes a collage. If they were going to design a park, they would make a collage of the images of their ideal park. Then we would draw names and someone else would design for this other person’s park. Well, if you grew up in the valley of California of Latino background, your images were quite different from the preppy from New England. I did this years ago at NC State. There, I had a guy from West Texas and a woman from Massachusetts. All of her spaces were enclosed in green, and all of his were vast and open. They had trouble making the transition to the other’s spatial value system.

Community projects are one way to do it, but they’re very complicated, and it takes a sophisticated teacher to do them. They’re best done after students have some experience and build up some skills because there’s often the danger of both disappointing students and the community. They can be excellent experiences, but an experience in which students realize not everybody sees the landscape exactly the way they do.

Brad McKee, editor of Landscape Architecture Magazine, has called you “sublimely practical.” Do you believe the devil is in the details? How do you teach students to care about the details when they are making something?

Materials are design opportunities. They are the opportunities where we can be the most creative.

Many of our design leaders just do an extraordinary job now. But they didn’t 40 years ago. When I was a student at the University of Pennsylvania 40 years ago, it was asphalt with wood trim and brick-banded concrete and that was pretty much what we learned. Poured-in-place concrete. We’ve broadened out quite a bit.

The best way to teach and for students to learn to be creative is through observation. I taught a field trip course at Berkeley. All we would do is go to projects where my colleagues in practice in the Bay Area were very generous to show them projects under constructions, talk about the choice of materials, source of the materials, the problems in installing them, how they worked.

The students would also do a post-material construction evaluation — go to projects and make their own observations, take notes, keep a detail notebook. They would go out with some kind of measuring device. I have them use notebooks with grid paper. They would have to draw-to-scale sketch– not hard line, just draw over a grided scale, a detail of a bike rack or curb edge. They would keep that notebook throughout the semester.

What I was trying to do is give them a new pair of eyes. It’s been very rewarding when I have a student who years later says, “Oh, I still do that. I still go out and look, measure, and try to understand.” We can’t possibly teach in school what you need to know about materials and detailing. What we can do is get people excited about them, make them curious, and give them a new pair of eyes.

Student Sketchbooks / Linda Jewell

The other thing I do in the field trip course is go to offsite manufacturing, so students become familiar with how things are fabricated. The digital age has given us so many different ways to produce materials, with all of the laser cutting and digitally-run equipment that are creates in shops and then installed in the field. These trips also armed students with building techniques they then used in my design-build class.

Bike Racks for Wurster. College of Environmental Design, University of California at Berkeley / Linda Jewell
ASLA 2011 Student Collaboration Honor Award. Wurstershire Sauce, University of California at Berkeley / Yes Duffy

What’s the worst construction errors you’ve ever seen? And the worst mistake in the application of materials?

I’d be hard pressed to pick one project. I did a lot of work for speculative developers in the D.C. area who were not prone to spend a lot of money. They had some very basic ways of building: poured-in-place concrete, three-inch pipe rail. You’ve seen some of the work over at Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia. They built in pre-cast concrete.

What we tried to do in the Crystal City Water Park is use the materials as best we could so the developers were comfortable using and maintaining the park.

Crystal City Water Park / Linda Jewell
Crystal City Water Park / Anton Grassl

Some of the biggest mistakes are made when your budget and your ideas about what can be built are misaligned. One of the construction field trips we used to go on visited Ron Herman’s very high-end residential projects. They were wonderful to see, because Ron would work with granite that had been cut so precisely to a quarter of an inch. Students could understand the tolerances that he was able to work with, because he had the money. Then we’d go to a public bid project in Berkeley where they were doing poured-in-place concrete. There, you shouldn’t have the expectation that you were going to have the kind of precision that Ron could have.

You learn and observe, but you’re not going to do that while you’re in school. All you can do is set people up to ask: what kind of craftsmanship can I get in this particular situation? Who are the local craftsman? How can I bring them in?

Maybe landscape architects and architects are not very adventuresome about finding the local craftsmen and getting some real bargains out of them in terms of crafted benches, detailing in the landscape. But others are. Many of our most creative landscape architects — even with modest budgets — do this.

You gotta craft to your situation. That’s where I see the worst mistakes: an expectation that every line, every joint is going to line up. If it’s going to the low bidder in a public project, it’s probably not going to line up.

Should all landscape architecture educators practice and all practitioners teach?

No, but some of them should on both ends. Every landscape architecture faculty should include people that have practiced or are actively practicing. That doesn’t mean bringing in the local practitioner to teach a materials class. We need a number of people on the full-time tenure-track faculty who have a role in running the department and developing the curriculum with experience in practice.

Departments also need people who strictly do research on speculative, creative projects like Alan Berger at MIT, or James Corner, ASLA, at the University of Pennsylvania, when he started out. If you have that range of people, then they begin to start conversations with each other.

It takes work on the part of faculty to integrate practitioners who are not being paid. Many of them are very generous, but they really have a time squeeze. I mentioned the construction field trip course. I couldn’t do that without participation of practitioners. But I had to cultivate that relationship. Full-time faculty have to cultivate relationships with local practitioners.

What was it like to be the first woman to run the landscape architecture department at Harvard Graduate School of Design? Did you feel supported or like you had to overcome sexism?

When I studied architecture, I was the only woman in my class. I did not have a woman colleague until I went to the University of Pennsylvania to study landscape architecture. Not only did I have a women student colleagues, but Carol Franklin, FASLA, was one of my instructors. That was a whole new world.

I have my #MeToo stories, believe me, because I was the only woman. I was pretty accustomed to dealing with those kinds of situations.

My colleagues on the landscape architecture department were wonderful. I was the only woman. Well, Anne Whiston Spirn, FASLA, was there when I first went, but then she left, and there was just me, and then I hired Elizabeth Meyer, FASLA, who became chair of the landscape architecture department at the University of Virginia and later dean of their architecture school. I have liked having women around.

It was a little more difficult with some of the architecture faculty and administration who put me in a girl box. The girl box is helper-mate. Good administrator; take care of the problem. I’m not saying that my landscape architecture colleagues were like that. Michael Van Valkenburgh, FASLA; Carl Steinitz; Laurie Olin, FASLA; and Peter Walker, FASLA were all terrific to me. They appreciated that I took care of the administrative crap and tried to do it well, but I never felt that they put me in a box.

The first year I started teaching at Harvard, Carl warned me that I would have nearly 90-year-old Norman Newton teaching in the first semester studio with me, even though he’d been retired for 30 years. Norman was known for dismissing women. He was often criticized that his history book didn’t even cover Beatrix Farrand in any comprehensive way. That just kind made me more determined to reach out and develop a bond with him, which I did through an exhibition of his work on construction details. It was also good for me, because it sent me in a whole new direction of how to teach construction. That was the inspiration for me teaching students to go out, observe, and measure existing details.

There are more high-profile women landscape architects and educators than ever before. How has it changed for women practitioners and educators over the past few decades?

It has been terrific because we support each other. With the commissions I sit on, I have been in the position to advocate for women’s firms to be hired. It was no compromise on my part, because we’re talking about Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) and firms like that. But I’ve found you still have to advocate. The more of us out there, the more we can advocate for each other. There’s now a significant old girls’ network.

There are still obstacles. I know women-owned firms where the heads of the firms, even some of our most talented people, struggle to get the interview for a project. The obstacles are more subtle and much less than they used to be.

I want to give thanks to people like Thaisa Way, FASLA, who has writing about the many women from the 1910s-1903 who were doing significant work and were never talked about. At Landscape Architecture Magazine, from Grady Clay up to the current editor Brad McKee, there has been a real effort to make sure women aren’t shunted to the side. Grady Clay was very good when he put Martha Schwartz’s Bagel Garden on the cover of the magazine. When he hired me as construction editor when I was in my 20s — rather than some of the other people who applied — he was a rebel.

Los Libros de Actividades — Descubre la Arquitectura Paisajista — de ASLA Ahora Disponibles en Español

Los libros de actividades de ASLA – Descubre la Arquitectura Paisajista es para cualquier persona que esté interesada en la arquitectura paisajista, la arquitectura, la planificación y la ingeniería, y para aquellos que les gusta dibujar, garabatear e inspirarse. El enfoque principal de los libros es la arquitectura paisajista, que ofrece a los lectores la oportunidad de ver muchos dibujos, lugares y paisajes creados por los arquitectos paisajistas.

Descargar Libro de actividades de ASLA para niños y niñas

Realiza un viaje a través de una ciudad imaginaria para aprender sobre los elementos básicos de construcción de la arquitectura paisajista. En este libro de actividades, aprenderás sobre la arquitectura paisajista, verás bocetos de profesionales de la arquitectura paisajista y tendrás la oportunidad de dibujar y colorear dibujos. Este libro está dirigido a lectores de 9 a 12 años de edad.

Dibujo por Jim Richard, FASLA / ASLA
Dibujo por Michael Batts, ASLA / ASLA

Descargar Libro de actividades de ASLA para adolescentes y adultos

Realiza un viaje por los Estados Unidos para ver algunos de los grandes lugares diseñados por arquitectos paisajistas. En este libro de actividades, aprenderás sobre la arquitectura paisajista, verás bocetos de profesionales de la arquitectura paisajista, tendrás la oportunidad de dibujar y colorear dibujos, y resolverás problemas para planear tus propios proyectos. Este libro está dirigido a lectores mayores de 13 años.

Dibujo por by Yifu Kang, Student ASLA
Dibujo por by Robert Chipman, ASLA / ASLA

¡Comparte los libros!

¿Tienes un amigo/a que esté interesado en la arquitectura paisajista? ¿A sus hijos/as les gusta la idea de mezclar el arte con el medio ambiente? ¿Eres un profesional de la arquitectura paisajista que visita una escuela local y busca una actividad interactiva divertida?

Si eres niño/a, adolescente, padre, madre, maestro/a, estudiante no graduado o profesional de la arquitectura paisajista, hay muchas maneras de compartir los libros de actividades. Para empezar, comparte con familiares, amigos/as, compañeros/as de clase, vecinos, otros profesionales y miembros de la comunidad.

Y no olvides compartir tu trabajo. ¡Publica tus dibujos con #ASLAactivitybooks para mostrar al mundo tus talentos creativos! No te pierdas las futuras iniciativas de ASLA, incluyendo las copias disponibles para su distribución y las ediciones traducidas al español.

Diseño de un dispositivo digital

Los arquitectos paisajistas crean dibujos en papel y en dispositivos digitales. Si estás interesado en realizar los libros de actividades desde tu dispositivo digital, echa un vistazo a algunas de las aplicaciones y programas gratuitos que aparecen a continuación y que incluyen herramientas de dibujo.