Celebrate World Landscape Architecture Month 2021

(Bottom Left): 2020 ASLA Honor Award in General Design. Deep Form of Designed Nature: Sanya Mangrove Park. Sanya City, Hainan Province, China. TURENSCAPE | Image by Kongjian Yu, Turenscape (Middle): 2020 ASLA Honor Award in Urban Design. The 606. Chicago, Illinois, United States. Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. | Image by Alex MacLean (Top Right): 2019 ASLA Honor Award in General Design. Barangaroo Reserve. Sydney, Australia. PWP Landscape Architecture | Image by PWP Landscape Architecture

Last year, ASLA celebrated World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM) with the theme “Life Grows Here” in the places and spaces that landscape architects create in communities around the world. This year, ASLA is building on that success with our new campaign: Growing Together.

ASLA’s vision is “healthy, beautiful, and resilient places for all.” This April, we will show how landscape architecture projects embody that vision in all communities — communities of all colors, socioeconomic backgrounds, and abilities. We want to highlight how the spaces landscape architects create promote and facilitate people growing together with each other and with nature.

Keeping in mind restraints like the ongoing pandemic, this year’s campaign is designed to be flexible and versatile and focused on diversity in the landscape architecture profession.

ASLA members, landscape architects, and the public can participate by:

And as part of this year’s World Landscape Architecture Month, ASLA is also teaming up with EarthDay.org to sponsor The Great Global Cleanup 2021. ASLA members and the public can organize and join local cleanup projects as part of the effort.

Now in its third year, the Great Global Cleanup is building on its record as the world’s largest coordinated volunteer event, providing opportunities for individuals and organizations to make positive, tangible impacts on our environment.

Emerging from the coronavirus pandemic and guided by updated safety protocols, the collective goal this month is to remove millions more pieces of trash from our green spaces, urban communities, and waterways.

“Pollution is a prodigious issue in public open spaces — causing flooding, spreading illness, contaminating water sources, and at the root of a myriad of other problems,” said Torey Carter-Conneen, CEO of ASLA.

“Plastic and other types of pollution challenge every community every day,” said Kathleen Rogers, EarthDay.org President. “They are contaminating our oceans, clogging our drains, causing floods, spreading disease, transmitting respiratory infections, and killing wildlife; and low-income communities suffer the worst impacts. Thank you to ASLA for joining our efforts to restore our natural and urban landscapes.”

The goal is simple: as many local, pandemic-conscious cleanups as possible.

Organize a cleanup: We’re hoping every ASLA chapter can host at least one cleanup in April, but any member can take the lead. When organizing a cleanup, be sure to comply with all federal and local safety and health guidelines related to COVID-19.

Join a cleanup: Many cleanups have already been organized across the country. See where you can join in.

Register your cleanup on ASLA’s portal: Visit the portal to register your cleanup and keep track of your progress! The data you enter will be aggregated with cleanups across the country.

RSVP to Frederick Law Olmsted’s 199th Birthday Celebration

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY / tupungato, istockphoto.com

By Olmsted 200

To mark Frederick Law Olmsted’s 199th birthday, Olmsted 200 is inviting everyone to participate in a special two-part event — a viewing of Olmsted and America’s Urban Parks, narrated by actress Kerry Washington, and a panel discussion with landscape architects and park directors from around the country.

Stream the film for free at your leisure from April 24 to 25 and then join Olmsted 200 via Zoom on April 26 at 5:30 pm EST for a discussion on Olmsted’s thinking about today’s social, environmental, economic, and health challenges. TIME Magazine’s senior correspondent for climate, Justin Worland, will moderate.

Panelists include:

  • Dr. Thaisa Way, FASLA, Resident Program Director for Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks
  • Happy Haynes, Executive Director of Denver Parks and Recreation
  • Justin DiBerardinis, Director of FDR Park, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation

To learn more about the birthday celebration, RSVP on the event page.

This event is hosted by the National Association for Olmsted Parks (NAOP), the managing partner of Olmsted 200. ASLA is one of ten founding partners of Olmsted 200, the bicentennial celebration of the birth of Frederick Law Olmsted (FLO).

Olmsted 200

April 26, 2022, marks the 200th birthday of FLO— author, journalist, public official, city planner, and father of American landscape architecture—and Olmsted 200 is teaming up with organizations across the country to celebrate him all year long.

Olmsted and his successor firms designed thousands of landscape projects across the country, transforming American life and culture. His vision of public parks for all people — and their ability to strengthen communities and promote public well-being — are now more important than ever.

Through events, education, and advocacy at the local and national levels, Olmsted 200 ensures that Olmsted’s legacy lives on by renewing public and policy commitments to the preservation and maintenance of our historic parks and places.

We hope you’ll use Olmsted 200 as a resource to find parks near you, share your stories, and celebrate with us.

Visit the Olmsted 200 website for event information, blog posts written by diverse thought leaders, teaching materials, and so much more.

Subscribe to the Olmsted 200 newsletter for updates and inspiration and follow Olmsted 200 on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Use #CelebrateOlmsted, #ParksForAll, #KnowFLO to join the campaign conversation online.

Positive Impact in Rapid Time: AARP Community Challenge Grants

AARP is once again offering its Community Challenge Grants, which range from a few hundred dollars up to tens of thousands, to non-profit organizations and local governments. AARP seeks to fund permanent or temporary small-scale projects that can be designed and implemented in just a few months. This year, the focus is on projects that support community equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts.

Landscape architects and designers, please take note: AARP is prioritizing projects that “improve open spaces, parks, and access to other amenities; and deliver a range of transportation and mobility options that increase connectivity, walkability, bikeability, wayfinding, access to transportation options, and roadway improvements.” They are also interested in projects that support community recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

Since 2017, AARP’s program has awarded 560 grants totaling $6.1 million, which have resulted in rapid-fire actions that improve community livability for all ages — not just older adults. 60 percent of grants have gone to 501(c)(3), 501(c)(4), and 501(c)(6) nonprofits, and the rest to local governments. 42 percent of grants have gone to urban communities, 38 percent to rural areas, and 20 percent to suburban areas.

According to AARP, 45 percent of grants have had a catalytic impact, helping grantees gain additional funds and support from public and private organizations. And 81 percent of grants helped grantees “overcome policy barriers and advance change.”

Applications are due April 14, 2021, and all projects must be completed by November 10, 2021.

ASLA 2021 Professional & Student Awards Call for Entries

ASLA 2020 Professional General Design Honor Award. Naval Cemetery Landscape. Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects / Max Touhey

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is now accepting submissions for its 2021 Professional and Student Awards Program.

The ASLA Awards Program is the oldest and most prestigious in the landscape architecture profession. They honor the most innovative landscape architecture projects and the brightest ideas from up-and-coming landscape architecture students.

“The ASLA Professional & Student Awards recognize the most innovative and impactful work in the profession,” said Tom Mroz, 2021 president of ASLA. “Our professional winners are leaders in the industry. Our student winners represent the best and brightest hope for the future. Each year, we get entries from all around the world. I can’t wait to see the creative projects this year’s Call for Entries brings.”

Award recipients receive featured coverage in Landscape Architecture Magazine and are honored at a special Awards Presentation ceremony in the fall.

Submissions for ASLA Professional Awards are due no later than 11:59 PST on Friday, March 12, 2021.

Submissions for ASLA Student Awards are due no later than 11:59 PST on Monday, May 24, 2021.

ASLA bestows Professional Awards in General Design, Residential Design, Urban Design, Analysis & Planning, Communications, Research categories. In each of these categories, juries select a number of Honor Awards and may select one Award of Excellence. One Landmark Award is also presented each year.

The 2021 Professional Awards Jury includes:

  • Chair: Thaïsa Way, FASLA – Dumbarton Oaks
  • Virginia Burt, FASLA – Virginia Burt Designs, Inc.
  • Sahar Coston-Hardy, Affiliate ASLA – Sahar Coston-Hardy Photography
  • Perry Howard, FASLA – Greensboro, NC USA
  • Kene Okigbo, ASLA – RDG Planning & Design
  • Faith Okuma, ASLA – Surroundings Studio, LLC
  • Karen Phillips, FASLA – NYS Homes & Community Renewal
  • David Rubin, FASLA – David Rubin Land Collective
  • Emma Skalka, Hon. ASLA – Victor Stanley
ASLA 2020 Student Communications Award of Excellence. Jia: Bringing Landscape Architecture to Webtoons / July Aung

ASLA bestows Student Awards in General Design, Residential Design, Urban Design, Analysis & Planning, Communications, Research, Student Community Service, and Student Collaboration. In each of these categories, juries select a number of Honor Awards and may select one Award of Excellence.

The 2021 Student Awards Jury includes:

  • Chair: Diane Jones Allen, FASLA – Design Jones LLC
  • Magdalena Aravena, ASLA – Lamar Johnson Collaborative
  • Jane Berger – Freelance Journalist
  • Rebecca Bradley, ASLA – Cadence
  • L. Irene Compadre, ASLA – Arbolope Studio
  • Gabriel Diaz Montemayor, ASLA – University of Arkansas
  • Jessica Henson, ASLA – OLIN
  • Radhika Mohan – Enterprise Community Partners
  • Paola Moya, Assoc. AIA – Moya Design Partners

ASLA 2021 Honors Call for Nominations

2014 ASLA LaGasse Medal – Landscape Architecture recipient. David Ramiro Villalvazo, ASLA / EPNAC

Nominations for the 2021 ASLA Honors are open. These prestigious awards recognize individuals and organizations for their lifetime achievements and notable contributions to the profession of landscape architecture.

Honors nomination categories include:

The ASLA Medal
The ASLA Design Medal
The Community Service Awards
The Jot D. Carpenter Teaching Medal
The LaGasse Medals
The Landscape Architecture Firm Award
The Landscape Architecture Medal of Excellence
The Olmsted Medal
The ASLA Emerging Professional Medal

Nominations are also open for ASLA Honorary Membership. Honorary membership recognizes persons other than landscape architects whose achievements of national or international significance or influence have provided notable service to the profession of landscape architecture.

The deadline for all nominations is February 5, 2021.

Any ASLA professional member or ASLA chapter may submit nominations for ASLA honors. For more details on the nomination criteria by category, view the links above.

Questions about the nomination process for ASLA honors and honorary membership may be directed to honorsawards@asla.org or by calling 202-216-2331.

This post is by Makeeya Hazelton, Manager, Honors & Awards.

Call for Presentations: 2021 ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture

Cumberland Park, Nashville, Tennessee / Hargreaves Jones

ASLA is accepting proposals for the 2021 Conference on Landscape Architecture in Nashville, Tennessee, November 19-22, 2021.

We are looking for education proposals that will help to drive change in the field of landscape architecture and provide solutions to everyday challenges that are informed by research and practice. Help us shape the 2021 education program by submitting a proposal through our online system by Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. PT.

NEW for 2021
The 2021 conference education program will be organized across dynamic conference tracks. Before submitting your proposal, prepare by reviewing the seven track descriptions, which cover the topics most relevant to the practice of landscape architecture and cross-sector collaborations:

  • Design and the Creative Process
  • Design Implementation
  • Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion
  • Leadership, Career Development, and Business
  • Planning, Urban Design, and Infrastructure
  • Resilience and Stewardship
  • Technology

Submission Resources

Google Group
To coordinate proposals and network with potential speakers, we encourage you to use the Call for Presentations Google group.

Education Session Submission Guidelines
Our session submission guides provide info on what you need to include, expert tips on putting together a winning proposal, and help to determine which session type best fits your proposal:

60- or 75-Minute Education Session Guide
Deep Dive Session Guide
Field Session Guide

Submission Templates
Speakers are welcome to use the submission Word templates to collaborate on proposals before completing the online submission. The templates provide descriptions of the required submission information and can be edited and shared:

60- and 75- minute session template
Deep dive session template
Field session template

Conference Session Guide Examples
Review the session descriptions, learning outcomes, and session guides from past conferences.

Please visit the submission site to learn more about criteria, the review process, and key dates.

Submit your session proposal today.

This post is by Katie Riddle, ASLA, director of professional practice at ASLA.

Register Today for reVISION ASLA 2020

reVISION ASLA 2020

reVISION ASLA 2020 is convenient: up to 25 professional development hours (PDH) live and on demand until January 31, 2021.

Don’t worry about being trapped in a virtual video vacuum at reVISION ASLA 2020. Bite-sized learning opportunities like Field Sessions, Game Changers, and Virtual Networking opportunities promise a change of pace.

LIVE Schedule
Monday, November 16, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm EST
Tuesday, November 17, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm EST
Wednesday, November 18, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm EST

reVISION is big ideas
Landscape architects can maximize their capacity to realistically mitigate climate change. Explore the design track with speakers including Pamela Conrad, ASLA, LEED AP.

reVISION is important issues
Wildfire vulnerability in Australia and western states in the U.S. are causing us to focus more on resilience in these communities. Explore the climate change track with speakers including Greg Kochanowski, ASLA, AIA.

reVISION is thoughtful conversations
The study and amplification of cultural landscapes can promote more inclusive and creative placemaking. Explore the diversity, equity, and inclusion and racism in the profession tracks with speakers like Ujijji Davis, ASLA.

reVISION is hands-on information
Learn best practices from the experts all while discovering the newest products and techniques in the industry. Explore Design Day with speakers like Gina Ford, FASLA.

reVISION is GREAT VALUE.
Save up to 75% from the in-person event.

For ASLA members (full, associate, affiliate, corporate), registration is $199. For non-members, the rate is $299. ASLA student members can register for just $25. And emeritus ASLA members can register for $75.

And don’t forget to have some fun with our happy hour Green New Deal Superstudio Meetup at the end of day one!

Join prominent educators and practitioners as they share their experiences teaching and coordinating studios as part of the Green New Deal Superstudio, a national conversation on how the framework of the Green New Deal’s key tenets of jobs, justice, and decarbonization can be translated from policy into actual projects with regional and local specificity.

Register today!

Fellowship Opportunities in Urban Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks

Dumbarton Oaks / Jared Green

Dumbarton Oaks, a Harvard University research institute, library, museum, and garden in Washington, D.C., has a number of fellowships open to landscape architecture academia and practitioners focused on race, democracy, and urban landscapes.

For those who seek to conduct innovative research while social distancing in a more inspired setting — a serene garden designed by Beatrix Farrand — this is a prime opportunity.

2021-2022 Mellon Fellowships in Urban Landscape Studies: These are available as part of the Mellon-funded initiative on “Democracy and the Urban Landscape: Race, Identity, and Difference.” Fellowships are for cross-disciplinary scholars, with a preference for those with PhD or master’s of landscape architecture degrees. Apply by December 1.

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, fsa 8a15779.

Learn more about Dumbarton Oaks Garden and Landscape Studies’ symposium scheduled for April 30 to May 1, 2021: Land Back: Indigenous Landscapes of Resurgence and Freedom. Explore their recent virtual symposium on Segregation and Resistance in America’s Urban Landscapes, and read an in-depth report on their 2019 colloquium: the Landscapes of Enslavement. All these educational efforts have been funded with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Mellon History Teaching Fellowships: These are for current faculty members in universities and other post-secondary educational institutions. Apply by December 1.

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, fsa 8b21739.

Garden and Landscape Fellowships and Project Grants: Awarded for an academic year or a semester, research fellowships are available to scholars with a terminal degree. Junior fellowships are available for degree candidates who have fulfilled all preliminary requirements for a terminal degree.

According to Dumbarton Oaks, project grants are “intended to support primary research of a specific site. Project grants may be used for a broad array of projects including field research, site analysis, botanical surveys, heritage conservation and restoration planning, with the goal of promoting the preservation and understanding of historic gardens and other significant designed landscapes.” Apply by November 1.

Another opportunity worth exploring for those who design classical gardens like Dumbarton Oaks:

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA) is accepting submissions for the Bunny Mellon Landscape Design Prize, “which recognizes the excellence and creativity of a project from an emerging landscape or architectural design professional whose work is inspired by classical or traditional design, holistically considers the symbiosis between outdoor environments and physical structures, and interweaves garden and architectural elements within their design.”

Oak Spring garden by Bunny Mellon / Blissful Gardeners

The winner will receive a $1,500 cash prize and will be recognized at the ICAA Southeast Garden Symposium: An Exploration of Architecture & Landscape, May 30-April 1, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia, with weekend and travel expenses paid. Apply by December 15.

The prize is part of ICAA’s Bunny Mellon Landscape Curricula, which offers programs in landscape architecture for designers, students, and the public. According to ICAA, “this curricula, the first to be named in honor of Bunny Mellon, honors her commitment to landscape design, and her deeply-held belief that architecture is firmly linked to its surrounding landscape.”

Bunny Mellon with topiary / Blissful Gardeners

Ideas Competition: Hyperloop Desert Campus

Imagine shuttling through a large pneumatic tube at speeds up to 760 mph (1,200 kmh). In 2012, Elon Musk, founder of Tesla, proposed just that with his Hyperloop transportation system. Encased in a low-pressure tube, passengers and freight could be sped on magnetic levitation tracks from San Francisco to Los Angeles in just 35 minutes. To spur innovation, Tesla and Space X decided to make their initial Hyperloop technologies open source. A number of teams in the U.S. and Europe — including Virgin Hyperloop One, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, and Transpod — have since taken up the challenge, undertaking feasibility analyses, prototyping passenger pod and track technologies, and even building mile-long test tracks. The Wall Street Journal declared there is now a real “Hyperloop movement” around the world.

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies’ full-scale passenger capsule in Puerto de Santa Maria, Spain / Hyperloop Transportation Technologies
Hyperloop track assembly in California / Hyperloop Transportation Technologies
Virgin Hyperloop One capsule and test track / Virgin Hyperloop One

Now, Young Architects Competitions (YAC) has announced an ideas competition for a visionary (and imaginary) Hyperloop Desert Campus outside Las Vegas, Nevada, which they argue is the perfect site for experimentation. YAC hopes to build on the open source spirit of the quest for a Hyperloop by creating new models of planning and design collaboration.

The competition is also an opportunity for teams of young designers of many disciplines to get their bold ideas in front of a jury comprising architect Kazuyo Sejima, the Pritzker Prize-winning founder of SANAA; Carlo Ratti, a leading architect and engineer; and Winy Maas, co-founder and principal architect of the Dutch firm MVRDV.

Hyperloop Desert Campus / YAC

Planners, landscape architects, architects, engineers, and artists will have a major role to play in the success of any proposed Hyperloop networks. Stations and facilities need to feel safe and accessible. The tube infrastructure needs to be carefully integrated into existing communities and landscapes. This is why the organizers believe a research center is needed. “A Hyperloop is made by the whole travel experience — from purchasing the ticket to the entertainment during the ride. Thinking about Hyperloop is thinking about its stations, its communication, its impact on the world, on cities, and on governments: an intricate system that requires research, testing, and training.”

The organizers seek to inspire multi-disciplinary teams to create a livable research community in the extreme conditions of the Mojave desert. With no lack of drama, they describe the site as a place of “burning horizons inhabited by sand foxes and by a rough and hostile vegetation; a place carved by millennia of solitude that is accustomed to the rattle of the snake and the high-pitched cry of birds of prey and does not easily tolerate human beings.”

For the imagined Hyperloop Desert Campus, YAC states there are no restrictions on the height of buildings or depth of excavations. However, they do note the lack of water in Las Vegas means the campus will need to optimize water collection and use. “Landscape design will be possible through xeriscaping techniques, that is designing ‘dry gardens,’ where dazzling native species such as palm trees, cacti, and yuccas can be used.”

Hyperloopers believe the tube network will be the most energy efficient transportation system in the world. As such, the campus also needs to model sustainability by producing its own electricity.

The design concepts will need to include a public welcome center, with reception hall, museum, tour route, arena, and restaurant. The headquarters will need to include laboratories, offices, apartments, and a gym and pool for staff. Lastly, a training center will need to include classrooms and additional laboratories.

The first prize winner will take home €8,000 ($9,400), second place winner €4,000 ($4,700), and the third prize winner, €4,000 ($2,300). Two additional “gold mentions” will receive €500 ($588) prizes, and there will be 10 honorary mentions.

Registration is due September 20, 2020, and submissions on September 23, 2020. Each team needs to include at least one member aged 18 to 35. There are no restrictions on the number of team members, their disciplines, or locations.

Another competition worth exploring: Lyceum, creators of traveling fellowships, have organized a design competition open to landscape architecture students. The Governor Ames Estate in North Easton, Massachusetts, will become the heart of a new cultural district.

Lyceum

Design students are tasked with creating a 1,500 square foot (139 square meter) event pavilion near or within the Estate House footprint. The goal is for the pavilion to create a “unique relationship with the designed landscape that can enhance the visitor experience and provide a platform for community, family gatherings, and celebrations.”

Landscape architect Stephen Stimson, FASLA, founder of Stephen Stimson Associates, is a member of the jury. The first place winner will receive $12,000 and a three month traveling fellowship, with similarly enticing awards for second and third place winners. Applications are due May 14, 2021.

Apply Today: WxLA Scholarships to Upcoming ASLA Virtual Program

WxLA Founders: Gina Ford, FASLA; Steven Spears, FASLA; Jamie Maslyn Larson, ASLA; Cinda Gilliland, ASLA; and Rebecca Leonard, FAICP (not shown)

Last year, a group of landscape architects and planners — Gina Ford, FASLA; Steven Spears, FASLA; Jamie Maslyn Larson, ASLA; Cinda Gilliland, ASLA; and Rebecca Leonard, FAICP — founded WxLA, an advocacy initiative for gender justice in the field of landscape architecture.

After raising $10,000, the organization sent a group of seven young women to the ASLA 2019 Conference on Landscape Architecture. This year, WxLA is back, offering scholarships to a new group of emerging leaders so they can attend ASLA’s upcoming virtual program.

WxLA 2019 Scholars: Linda Chamorro, Samira Damiscar, Ashley Ludwig, Victoria Mancini, Lora Martens, Devon Miller, and Saeideh Teymouri
WxLA 2019 Scholars: Linda Chamorro, Samira Damiscar, Ashley Ludwig, Victoria Mancini, Lora Martens, Devon Miller, and Saeideh Teymouri

WxLA states that the purpose of the scholarship is to aid in the “professional development and success of young and emerging leaders” by covering costs associated with a virtual program. Applications are due August 15.

For upcoming educational content the team has planned, WxLA also asks landscape architecture professionals to fill out this survey.

Learn more about their initiatives and their partners, including the Wikipedia Project and Vela Project.