Olmsted 200 Celebrates FLO’s 200th Birthday

Prospect Park, New York City / AndreyGatash, istockphoto.com

Frederick Law Olmsted, social reformer and founder of American landscape architecture, was born on April 26, 1822, so this year marks the 200th anniversary of his birth. To explore and celebrate his life, work, and legacy, the National Association of Olmsted Parks (NAOP), ASLA, and other founding partners launched Olmsted 200.

As part of the celebration, the U.S. House of Representatives recently acknowledged Olmsted’s important contributions to American society. On March 29, Representatives French Hill (AR) and Debbie Dingell (MI) introduced a bipartisan proclamation honoring Olmsted’s legacy, which included a reference to ASLA being co-founded by his son.

April marks the peak of the Olmsted 200 celebration. Throughout the week of April 25, Olmsted 200 will be sharing content live from New York City, where NAOP, ASLA, and other founding partners will be celebrating. Olmsted’s New York City parks will be hosting Olmsted 200 partners and friends during multiple events.

Although the Olmsted Birthday Gala has sold out, there are several other events — many free — happening in NYC, for those who are local to the area or visiting for this monumental occasion.

The Olmsted 200 website also features an ever-changing national calendar full of in-person and virtual programs and events.

Upcoming events include:

Central and Prospect Park in New York City share many similarities, while also reflecting Olmsted’s evolution as a park designer. On April 12 at 12.30pm, the Central Park Conservancy and Turnstile Tour guides will simultaneously livestream from each park as they highlight, compare, and contrast Central Park’s arches, meadows, and natural features to parallel features found in Prospect Park. Learn about Olmsted’s lasting influence on landscape design and public space and see examples of how these designs have been adapted to better fit with modern-day recreational uses and ecological practices overtime. This is a virtual program over zoom; suggested donation $10.

“The Genius of the Place”: Frederick Law Olmsted, Landscape Architecture, and Arkansas on April 14 at 6.30 pm CT. Kimball Erdman, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Arkansas, will speak about Olmsted and the history of landscape architecture. Tom Hill of Hot Springs National Park will discuss Olmsted’s brief encounter with Arkansas. And Chris East of StudioMain will address landscape architecture possibilities next to the Main Library in Little Rock.

Olmsted 200 is teaming up with Central Park Conservancy for a very special Instagram Live on April 25 at 10:30 am ET.

The Evolution of Olmsted’s Sudbrook Park from The Baltimore Architecture Foundation and friends will be held virtually on April 29.

Franklin Park: Past, Present, Future on April 30 from 2-4 pm ET. The Boston Society of Landscape Architects is organizing a free walking tour with John Kett, ASLA, principal, and Lydia Gikas Cook, ASLA, senior Associate, with Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architecture. The firm is leading an interdisciplinary team with Agency Landscape + Planning and MASS Design Group to re-imagine Olmsted’s Franklin Park, part of the original Emerald Necklace.

The National Association for Olmsted Parks’ Chicago Bicentennial Gala will be in-person on June 17 and include several tours.

Explore all upcoming events.

For previously recorded presentations, including the most recent Conversations with Olmsted program, visit YouTube.

Also, hosting an Olmsted 200 event of your own? Submit it to the calendar, and please consider using the press kit and press release templates to share with local media.

Olmsted 200’s website also includes a blog, Shared Spaces, which features diverse voices exploring Olmsted’s living legacy. Olmsted 200 will continue throughout the year and is interested in posts from those willing to share information about local projects, personal reflections, site histories, and more. To submit blog posts, contact Olmsted 200.

April Is World Landscape Architecture Month!

ASLA 2021 Professional General Design Honor Award. Atlanta Dairies. Atlanta, Georgia. Perkins&Will / Sahar Coston-Hardy

For #WLAM2022, we explore: What is landscape architecture? What does landscape architecture mean to you?

ASLA invites you to post your answers on your social media channels throughout the month of April. Tell the world what landscape architecture is. Use simple language.

Step 1: Select a photo that you think best explains landscape architecture

ASLA 2021 Professional General Design Honor Award. Atlanta Dairies. Atlanta, Georgia. Perkins&Will / Sahar Coston-Hardy

Step 2: Overlay one of the WLAM Logos!

ASLA 2021 Professional General Design Honor Award. Atlanta Dairies. Atlanta, Georgia. Perkins&Will / Sahar Coston-Hardy

Step 3: Write a brief caption

Explain an aspect of landscape architecture that is important to you.

Step 4: Post to your social media accounts (Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook) using the hashtag #WLAM2022

ASLA

Since April 26, 2022 is Frederick Law Olmsted’s 200th birthday, you can also celebrate Olmsted landscapes near you through Instagram. Include the hashtags #WLAM2022 along with #Parks4AllPeople or #CelebrateOlmsted. Learn more about programs and events during the month of April at Olmsted 200.

From April 23 to 25, ASLA National will select the top five #WLAM2022 Instagram posts, based on combined number of likes and comments.

On April 26, Olmsted’s 200th birthday, ASLA National will post the #1 top post on the National ASLA Instagram account. And during April 27-30, the other top four posts will be posted, one each day.

Download WLAM2022 Logos – PNG, JPEG, and EPS files.

If you have questions, please reach out to us at info@asla.org.

ASLA and WxLA Partner to Celebrate Women’s History Month

WxLA

WxLA and ASLA are partnering for Women’s History Month with a new series, WxLA Wednesday Walks. At 12pm on Wednesdays, fierce women leaders in landscape architecture across the country will give Instagram Live tours of places they have designed.

Inspired by civic action, equality movements around the world, and the personal experience of its founders, WxLA emerged in 2018 as a vocal advocacy initiative for gender justice in landscape architecture. WxLA raises awareness of the challenges that prevent women from reaching their highest potential, illuminates the barriers to women, provides strategies for change, and celebrate new models of working.

ASLA 2021 Professional Communications Honor Award. WxLA – Champions for Equality in Landscape Architecture / Jeri Hetrick

ASLA President, Eugenia Martin, FASLA, kicked-off the celebrations with a video message.

Throughout the month of March, join us on Instagram for live tours and Q&A’s with the designers. The first tour by Signe Nielsen, FASLA, founding principal at MNLA, on March 2 offered an exclusive look at Little Island in New York City.

Make sure to follow @NationalASLA on Instagram. ASLA and WxLA have many more amazing women and landscapes lined up for the rest of the month, with more being added!

3/2 – 12pm EST
Signe Nielsen, FASLA
MNLA
New York

3/9 – 12pm MST
Allison Colwell, ASLA, and Michelle Shelor, ASLA
Colwell Shelor Landscape Architecture
Phoenix

3/16 – 12pm CST
Hana Ishikawa, AIA
Site Design Group
Chicago

3/23 – 12pm CST
Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA
Ten Eyck Landscape Architects
Austin

3/30 – 12pm EST
Christine Hite, FASLA
Dix.Hite + Partners
Orlando

Learn about ASLA’s past Women’s History Month celebrations and other heritage month celebrations.

New Program Designed to Address Systemic Inequities in the Profession of Landscape Architecture

ASLA Diversity Summit / EPNAC

The ASLA Fund has launched the Women of Color Licensure Advancement Program to support women of color in their pursuit of landscape architecture licensure and increase racial and gender diversity within the profession.

In its inaugural year, the program will provide 10 women of color with a two-year, personalized experience that includes approximately $3,500 to cover the cost of the four sections of the Landscape Architectural Registration Exam (LARE), along with exam preparation courses, resources, and mentorship from a licensed landscape architect.

According to U.S. Census and ASLA data, approximately 18.5 percent of the U.S. population identifies as Hispanic or Latino, while only 6 percent of ASLA members do. 13.4 percent of the U.S. population identifies as African American, but only 2.14 percent of ASLA members do. 1.3 percent of the U.S. population identifies as American Indian or Alaska Natives, but only 0.45 percent of ASLA members do. And 6.3 percent of the U.S. population identifies as Asian and Pacific Islander while 13.5 percent of ASLA members do, but ASLA doesn’t separate Asian from Asian American and Pacific Islander members in its data.

A recent report by The Alliance for Responsible Professional Licensing found that among highly complex, technical fields, such as landscape architecture, a license narrows the gender-driven wage gap by about a third and the race-driven wage gap by about half.

The Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Board (CLARB)’s Council Record data shows that women and Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) are highly underrepresented among the profession: Only 7 percent of landscape architects are non-white and only 30 percent of landscape architects are women.

“The statistics are telling, and it is important we make major strides to ensure the makeup of the profession closely mirrors the communities they serve,” said ASLA President Eugenia Martin, FASLA. “We need to address these gaps, and women of color achieving licensure is a part of the solution.”

“As stated in ASLA’s Racial Equity Plan of Action released in 2021, we are committed to fostering equity and inclusion within the profession There is much more work to be done, but we believe this program is an important step towards meeting those goals,” said ASLA CEO Torey Carter-Conneen.

ASLA believes licensure is vital to protecting public health, safety, and welfare. Licensure also signifies a level of professional competency and can lead to greater career and business success. However, there can be significant barriers to licensure. Aside from the cost of a landscape architecture education, candidates must also pass the rigorous, four-part LARE.

The ASLA Women of Color Licensure Advancement Program was initiated with a generous $100,000 donation by former ASLA President Wendy Miller, FASLA, and James Barefoot; Marq Truscott, FASLA; Rachel Ragatz Truscott, ASLA; and CLARB.

Learn more about the program and how to apply. Applications are due April 1.

Call for Entries to ASLA 2022 Professional & Student Awards Now Open

ASLA 2021 Professional General Design Award of Excellence. Natural History Museum of Utah: A Museum Without Walls, Salt Lake City, Utah. Design Workshop / copyright Jeff Golberg/ESTO

ASLA is now accepting submissions for its 2022 Professional and Student Awards Program.

The ASLA Awards Program is the oldest and most prestigious in the landscape architecture profession. They honor the most innovative landscape architecture projects and the brightest ideas from up-and-coming landscape architecture students.

“The ASLA Professional and Student Awards recognize the most impactful work in the profession,” said Eugenia Martin, FASLA, President of ASLA. “Our professional winners advance planning and design at all scales, while our student winners are our future design leaders. Each year, the ASLA Awards increase globally, with submissions from around the world.”

Award recipients receive featured coverage in Landscape Architecture Magazine and are honored at a special Awards Presentation ceremony in the fall.

Submissions for ASLA Professional Awards are due no later than 11:59 PST on Friday, March 18, 2022.

Submissions for ASLA Student Awards are due no later than 11:59 PST on Monday, May 23, 2022.

ASLA bestows Professional Awards in General Design, Residential Design, Urban Design, Analysis & Planning, Communications, Research categories. In each of these categories, juries select a number of Honor Awards and may select one Award of Excellence. One Landmark Award is also presented each year.

The 2022 Professional Awards Jury includes:

  • Chair: Dennis Otsuji, FASLA – Wimmer Yamada and Caughey
  • Juan Antonio Bueno, FASLA – Falcon + Bueno
  • David Garce, (Catawba), ASLA – GSBS Architects (Retired)
  • Kimberly Garza, ASLA – ATLAS Lab
  • Zack Mortice – Design Journalist
  • Taner Ozdil, ASLA – The University of Texas at Arlington (Representing CELA)
  • Lesley Roth, FASLA – Lamar Johnson Collaborative
  • Glenn LaRue Smith, FASLA – PUSH Studio
  • Matty A. Williams – City of Detroit, Planning & Development
  • Gena Wirth, ASLA – SCAPE Landscape Architecture
  • Emily Vogler – Rhode Island School of Design (Representing LAF)
ASLA 2021 Student Communications Award of Excellence. Mud Gallery. Olympia, Washington. Alanna Matteson, Student ASLA; Zoe Kasperzyk; Danielle Dolbow. Faculty Advisors: Ken Yocom, ASLA; Jeff Hou, ASLA. University of Washington

ASLA bestows Student Awards in General Design, Residential Design, Urban Design, Analysis & Planning, Communications, Research, Student Community Service, and Student Collaboration. In each of these categories, juries select a number of Honor Awards and may select one Award of Excellence.

The 2022 Student Awards Jury includes:

  • Chair: Mark Hough, FASLA – Duke University
  • Monique Bassey, ASLA – Lamar Johnson Collaborative
  • Jessica Canfield, ASLA – Kansas State University
  • Aida Curtis, ASLA – Curtis + Rogers Design Studio South
  • Latoya Kamdang, AIA – Moody Nolan
  • SuLin Kotowicz, FASLA – VIRIDIS Design Group
  • Christopher Nolan, FASLA – Central Park Conservancy
  • Kongjian Yu, FASLA – Turenscape

Call for Presentations: ASLA 2022 Conference on Landscape Architecture

ASLA

By Katie Riddle

ASLA is currently accepting proposals for the 2022 Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Francisco, November 11-14, 2022. Help us shape the 2022 education program by submitting a proposal through our online system by Tuesday, February 22, 2022, at 12:00 NOON PT.

The ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture is the largest gathering of landscape architects and allied professionals in the world.

ASLA seeks education proposals that will help to drive change in the field of landscape architecture and provide solutions to everyday challenges informed by research and practice. Educational tracks include:

  • Changing the Culture in Practice
  • Design and the Creative Process
  • Design Implementation
  • Leadership, Career Development, and Business
  • Olmsted & Beyond: Practice in Progress
  • Planning, Urban Design, and Infrastructure
  • Resilience and Stewardship
  • Technology: Trends and Workflow

“At the upcoming 2022 conference, we will explore planning and design solutions to some of the world’s most challenging issues: how to increase resilience to climate change, how to rebuild our infrastructure, and how to ensure greater racial and social equity in all communities. Landscape architects are ready to come together to share knowledge and advance best practices,“ said ASLA President Eugenia Martin, FASLA.

“We look forward to building on the success of last year’s conference in Nashville, where we created a safe, inclusive in-person educational experience for the landscape architecture community. We hope to see more of our global friends in San Francisco as well. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, we will be watching closely to ensure we can again create a safe space for everyone,” said Torey Carter-Conneen, ASLA CEO.

Please visit the submission site to learn more about the 2022 education tracks, submission criteria, review process, and key dates.

Submission Resources

Education Session Submission Guides

Our session submission guides provide detailed information on what you need to include with expert tips on putting together a winning and help determine which session type best fits your proposal.

Education Session Guide: Education sessions are 60-, 75-, and 90-minute sessions that deliver a selection of relevant and timely topics. Session includes a minimum of 50 minutes of instruction followed by 10/15 minutes of Q&A, maximum three speakers.

Deep Dive Session Guide: Deep dive sessions are interactive, in-depth, 2.5-hour programs that explore specific landscape architecture topics, maximum five speakers.

Field Session Guide: Multiple speakers offer education combined with a field experience, highlighting local projects. Field sessions are organized through the local chapter.

Submission Templates

Speakers are welcome to use the submission Word templates for 60-,75-, or 90-minute sessions, deep dives, and field sessions to collaborate on proposals before completing the online submission. The templates provide descriptions of the required submission information and can be edited and shared.

Conference Session Guide Examples

Review the session descriptions, learning outcomes, and session guides from past conferences.

If you’re an ASLA member, make sure you have your unique ASLA Member ID or username handy – you should use it to log into the submission system.

Please visit the submission site to learn more about criteria, the review process, and key dates.

Submit your session proposal today.

Katie Riddle, ASLA, is director of professional practice at ASLA.

National Building Museum Reopens with Programs That Highlight Landscape Architecture

National Building Museum, Washington, D.C. / Kevin Allen, NBM

After weathering sixteen months of construction and then the pandemic, the National Building Museum (NBM) in Washington, D.C. is finally back open, with a great new visitor center that tells the story of landscape architecture, five exhibitions, and a new executive director. As part of World Landscape Architecture Month, the NBM has organized a series of online programs that explore historic and contemporary landscapes and equity:

Taliesen by Frank Lloyd Wright / Andrew Pielage

The Landscapes of Frank Lloyd Wright
Monday, April 19
6:30–8 pm EDT

In a program sponsored by the Darwina L. Neal Cultural Landscape Fund, created by former ASLA President Darwina L. Neal, FASLA, we will learn about how famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright considered the “landscape as an integral element in his work.”

Speakers include:

  • Mark Bayer, ASLA, founder and principal, Bayer Landscape Architecture, PLLC
  • Stuart Graff, president and CEO, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
  • Jennifer Gray, curator of Drawings and Archives, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University
  • Justin W. Gunther, director, Fallingwater and VP, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
  • Moderator Stephen Morris, chief of the Office of International Affairs, World Heritage Program Coordinator, National Park Service.

Speakers will discuss “how and why the work of Frank Lloyd Wright was sensitively integrated within their natural landscape settings and enhanced by their designed landscapes.” The discussion will explore many of the eight buildings and landscapes in the Frank Lloyd Wright World Heritage Site — which was announced in 2019 and became the first modern architecture designation in the United States — along with the recently restored landscape of the Martin House.

Franklin Park, Washington, D.C. / DAVID RUBIN Land Collective

Spotlight on Design: DAVID RUBIN Land Collective
Tuesday, April 27
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT

DAVID RUBIN Land Collective, a Philadelphia-based landscape architecture, urban design, and planning firm, states that “empathy for the public’s engagement with memorials and park spaces” informs their work.

Founding principal David A. Rubin, FASLA, will discuss the “joys and challenges of navigating Washington, D.C.’s complex federal and local public space environment, all while steadfastly emphasizing and advocating for the equity, access, and inclusion of every visitor.”

Rubin will cover Canal Park, Potomac Park Levee, the National World War I Memorial, and Franklin Park in Washington, D.C. Jennifer Reut, acting editor of Landscape Architecture Magazine, will moderate the program.

Building for a Decarceration Nation / Designing Justice+Designing Spaces

Equity in the Built Environment: Restorative Justice
Thursday, April 29
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT

In a program facilitated by landscape architect Maisie Hughes, ASLA, co-founder of The Urban Studio, Oakland-based non-profit Designing Justice+Designing Spaces will outline its efforts to “end mass incarceration by building infrastructure that addresses its root causes.”

Deanna Van Buren, co-founder, executive director, and design director, discusses her studio’s work countering the “traditional adversarial and punitive architecture of justice by creating spaces and buildings for restorative justice, community building, and housing for people coming out of incarceration.”

This program complements Building for a Decarceration Nation, a virtual exhibition offered by the University of California at Berkeley through May 15.

If in Washington, D.C. area, book timed entry tickets Friday through Sunday, 11AM-4PM for the time being. The NBM’s fantastic book store is also open.

Celebrate World Landscape Architecture Month 2021

(Bottom Left): 2020 ASLA Honor Award in General Design. Deep Form of Designed Nature: Sanya Mangrove Park. Sanya City, Hainan Province, China. TURENSCAPE | Image by Kongjian Yu, Turenscape (Middle): 2020 ASLA Honor Award in Urban Design. The 606. Chicago, Illinois, United States. Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. | Image by Alex MacLean (Top Right): 2019 ASLA Honor Award in General Design. Barangaroo Reserve. Sydney, Australia. PWP Landscape Architecture | Image by PWP Landscape Architecture

Last year, ASLA celebrated World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM) with the theme “Life Grows Here” in the places and spaces that landscape architects create in communities around the world. This year, ASLA is building on that success with our new campaign: Growing Together.

ASLA’s vision is “healthy, beautiful, and resilient places for all.” This April, we will show how landscape architecture projects embody that vision in all communities — communities of all colors, socioeconomic backgrounds, and abilities. We want to highlight how the spaces landscape architects create promote and facilitate people growing together with each other and with nature.

Keeping in mind restraints like the ongoing pandemic, this year’s campaign is designed to be flexible and versatile and focused on diversity in the landscape architecture profession.

ASLA members, landscape architects, and the public can participate by:

And as part of this year’s World Landscape Architecture Month, ASLA is also teaming up with EarthDay.org to sponsor The Great Global Cleanup 2021. ASLA members and the public can organize and join local cleanup projects as part of the effort.

Now in its third year, the Great Global Cleanup is building on its record as the world’s largest coordinated volunteer event, providing opportunities for individuals and organizations to make positive, tangible impacts on our environment.

Emerging from the coronavirus pandemic and guided by updated safety protocols, the collective goal this month is to remove millions more pieces of trash from our green spaces, urban communities, and waterways.

“Pollution is a prodigious issue in public open spaces — causing flooding, spreading illness, contaminating water sources, and at the root of a myriad of other problems,” said Torey Carter-Conneen, CEO of ASLA.

“Plastic and other types of pollution challenge every community every day,” said Kathleen Rogers, EarthDay.org President. “They are contaminating our oceans, clogging our drains, causing floods, spreading disease, transmitting respiratory infections, and killing wildlife; and low-income communities suffer the worst impacts. Thank you to ASLA for joining our efforts to restore our natural and urban landscapes.”

The goal is simple: as many local, pandemic-conscious cleanups as possible.

Organize a cleanup: We’re hoping every ASLA chapter can host at least one cleanup in April, but any member can take the lead. When organizing a cleanup, be sure to comply with all federal and local safety and health guidelines related to COVID-19.

Join a cleanup: Many cleanups have already been organized across the country. See where you can join in.

Register your cleanup on ASLA’s portal: Visit the portal to register your cleanup and keep track of your progress! The data you enter will be aggregated with cleanups across the country.

RSVP to Frederick Law Olmsted’s 199th Birthday Celebration

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY / tupungato, istockphoto.com

By Olmsted 200

To mark Frederick Law Olmsted’s 199th birthday, Olmsted 200 is inviting everyone to participate in a special two-part event — a viewing of Olmsted and America’s Urban Parks, narrated by actress Kerry Washington, and a panel discussion with landscape architects and park directors from around the country.

Stream the film for free at your leisure from April 24 to 25 and then join Olmsted 200 via Zoom on April 26 at 5:30 pm EST for a discussion on Olmsted’s thinking about today’s social, environmental, economic, and health challenges. TIME Magazine’s senior correspondent for climate, Justin Worland, will moderate.

Panelists include:

  • Dr. Thaisa Way, FASLA, Resident Program Director for Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks
  • Happy Haynes, Executive Director of Denver Parks and Recreation
  • Justin DiBerardinis, Director of FDR Park, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation

To learn more about the birthday celebration, RSVP on the event page.

This event is hosted by the National Association for Olmsted Parks (NAOP), the managing partner of Olmsted 200. ASLA is one of ten founding partners of Olmsted 200, the bicentennial celebration of the birth of Frederick Law Olmsted (FLO).

Olmsted 200

April 26, 2022, marks the 200th birthday of FLO— author, journalist, public official, city planner, and father of American landscape architecture—and Olmsted 200 is teaming up with organizations across the country to celebrate him all year long.

Olmsted and his successor firms designed thousands of landscape projects across the country, transforming American life and culture. His vision of public parks for all people — and their ability to strengthen communities and promote public well-being — are now more important than ever.

Through events, education, and advocacy at the local and national levels, Olmsted 200 ensures that Olmsted’s legacy lives on by renewing public and policy commitments to the preservation and maintenance of our historic parks and places.

We hope you’ll use Olmsted 200 as a resource to find parks near you, share your stories, and celebrate with us.

Visit the Olmsted 200 website for event information, blog posts written by diverse thought leaders, teaching materials, and so much more.

Subscribe to the Olmsted 200 newsletter for updates and inspiration and follow Olmsted 200 on social media: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Use #CelebrateOlmsted, #ParksForAll, #KnowFLO to join the campaign conversation online.

Positive Impact in Rapid Time: AARP Community Challenge Grants

AARP is once again offering its Community Challenge Grants, which range from a few hundred dollars up to tens of thousands, to non-profit organizations and local governments. AARP seeks to fund permanent or temporary small-scale projects that can be designed and implemented in just a few months. This year, the focus is on projects that support community equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts.

Landscape architects and designers, please take note: AARP is prioritizing projects that “improve open spaces, parks, and access to other amenities; and deliver a range of transportation and mobility options that increase connectivity, walkability, bikeability, wayfinding, access to transportation options, and roadway improvements.” They are also interested in projects that support community recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

Since 2017, AARP’s program has awarded 560 grants totaling $6.1 million, which have resulted in rapid-fire actions that improve community livability for all ages — not just older adults. 60 percent of grants have gone to 501(c)(3), 501(c)(4), and 501(c)(6) nonprofits, and the rest to local governments. 42 percent of grants have gone to urban communities, 38 percent to rural areas, and 20 percent to suburban areas.

According to AARP, 45 percent of grants have had a catalytic impact, helping grantees gain additional funds and support from public and private organizations. And 81 percent of grants helped grantees “overcome policy barriers and advance change.”

Applications are due April 14, 2021, and all projects must be completed by November 10, 2021.